(3)10.30 Eduardo Padrón (Louvre II-III, 26.04)

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(3)10.30 Eduardo Padrón (Louvre II-III, 26.04)

  1. 1. Conference  of  the  Americas  for  International  Education  (CAIE)  Panel:  Alliances  for  Inter-­‐American  Higher  Education:  The  Role  of  Private  Sector  and  Philanthropic  Organizations  April  26,  2012  10:30  –  12:00  • Recent  quote:  “Leaders  today  are  architects  of  collaboration.”  Very  timely  for  our   discussion  today.    • The  old  paradigm  is  separation  –  by  country,  culture,  institution,  discipline.  New   paradigm/new  technology/new  economy  demands  collaboration.    • Global  citizenship:  Extremely  important  for  our  students  to  graduate  with  global   awareness.    • They  see  the  world  differently;  they  don’t  adhere  to  same  boundaries  we  grew  up  with.   Communication  is  constant.    • Discussion  of  private/philanthropic  investment  is  very  important,  but  suggest  we  step  back   -­‐  ask  why  this  new  level  of  investment  is  occurring?      • Expanded  access  to  quality  higher  education  is  critical  today;  civil  rights  issue  of  our  time   for  all  people  –  all  income  levels,  races,  urban/rural,  indigenous.      • U.S.  offers  several  examples  of  challenges  many  other  countries  are  facing.    • Shrinking  middle  class  in  U.S.  and  dramatic  disparities  in  wealth  –  largest  gap  since  Great   Depression.      • Directly  linked  to  opportunity  gap;  individual,  community  and  national  economic  prosperity   -­‐  all  directly  linked  to  college  access  and  completion.      • 63%  of  all  jobs  now  being  created  in  U.S.  will  require  college-­‐level  learning  (Georgetown   Center  on  Educ  &  Wkforce);  similar  challenge  in  other  nations.    • Bachelor’s  degree  or  higher  in  U.S.:  $80K  annual  salary  in  2008;  high  school  grad:  $40K.     o Since  1983,  wages  for  bachelor’s  degree  earners  rose  34%;  high  school  grad:  13%.   Assoc  degrees  15%  but  provides  gateway  to  more  learning.     1    
  2. 2. • Data  on  level  of  educational  attainment  directly  corresponds  to  incomes;      • Major  challenge:  Open  the  door  to  higher  education  to  greatly  expanded  demographic   AND  –  find  a  way  to  pay  for  it.    • Funding  model  for  public  education  in  U.S.  has  reached  its  limit;  public  education  –   primary  responsibility  of  states  -­‐  has  declined  dramatically  in  U.S.  in  past  35  years.    • MDC  –  state  funding  per  student  declined  by  more  than  20%  in  past  4  years.  • Costs/tuition  have  risen  much  more  than  increase  in  incomes;  affects  low-­‐income  families   most.    • Alarm  in  U.S.  re  performance  of  our  students;  17th  and  24th  in  math  and  science  in  PISA   assessment.      Need  for  a  new  funding  model  • Begins  with  new  understanding  of  priority  of  education  –  a  priority  shared  by  all  sectors  of   society.    • U.S.  institutions  look  increasingly  to  additional  sources  of  funds  –  private  industry  and   philanthropy  –  to  fill  the  gap  in  funding.    • MDC  engaged  with  Gates,  Lumina,  Kresge,  Knight,  etc.  and  multiple  business/industry   partners;  constant  effort  at  grant  making.    • Aiming  to  bring  good  results  to  scale.    • Maximizing  private  $  for  interAmerican  educational  collaboration  requires  educational   partners  to  first  define  needs  and  collaborative  projects.      • Requires  several  factors:     o Review  of  economic  drivers/workforce  trends  and  education  needs  in  all  regions  of   the  Americas.     o Inventory  of  educational  programs  at  various  institutions,  including  degree  and   workforce-­‐focused  training.     o Establishment  of  institutional  partnerships  –  matching  learning  needs  to  regional   workforce  demands.       2    
  3. 3. o Increased  use  of  technology  to  make  curriculum  available  online  throughout   Americas.      • We  can  pave  the  way  for  private  philanthropy  and  corporate  engagement.      • MDC  in  training  partnerships  with  Argentina,  Colombia,  Ecuador,  Brazil,  and  Chile.    • Policy  influence  of  private  philanthropies  –  as  per  article  by  Stanley  Katz  from  Princeton   University  –  raises  important  points  but  given  government’s  failure  to  meet  higher   education  demand,  private  concerns  and  contributions  are  needed.    • Policy  and  priorities  of  various  philanthropies  may  differ  –  but  no  one  has  monopoly  on   successful  initiatives;  whatever  works  for  students  should  be  the  priority.    • Philanthropies  lately  are  encouraging  partnerships  between  institutions  and  multiple   sectors  (education  with  workforce  partners).    Collaboration  with  business  and  industry  • Skills  gap:  In  many  areas  of  U.S.  and  other  regions  of  the  Americas,  economies  have  shifted;   available  jobs  and  unemployment  co-­‐exist  because  of  skills  gap.    • Mid-­‐skill  jobs  are  available;  career  and  technical  education  via  short-­‐term  college   certification  is  the  necessary  response.   o In  U.S.,  14  million  career  and  technical  jobs  available  in  coming  years  (Georgetown   Center  on  Educ  &  Wkforce).    • Partnerships  with  industry  leaders  can  lead  to  curriculum  development,  contributions  of   equipment/technology,  scholarships,  internships  and  immediate  jobs  upon  completion  of   college  study.      • MDC  works  with  broad  range  of  industry  advisory  boards  for  professional  schools.  MDC  partnerships  in  the  Americas  • Current  MDC  MOUs:  Argentina,  Colombia,  Ecuador,  Brazil,  and  Chile.    • CCIS  Consortium  (College  Consortium  for  International  Studies):  MDC  has  partnerships  with   60  international  colleges/universities  in  30  countries.     3    
  4. 4. • Center  for  Latin  American  and  Caribbean  Initiatives  (CLACI)  provides  students  with   access  to  range  of  policy  viewpoints  and  cultural  perspectives;  builds  partnerships   throughout  the  region.     4    

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