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WELCOME
The Neuroarchitecture of Aging and
the “Sensthetic” Response
Upali Nanda PhD, EDAC, Assoc. AIA, Director of Research,
HKS
...
CE Information
AIA - 23 Credit Hours available
 Have the room monitor scan your conference badge before leaving each sess...
Reminders
 New this year attendees will be able to fill in a session evaluation via the mobile app,
please go to mobile a...
Session
Description
Neuroarchitecture is an emerging field. Understanding the aging brain
and the impact of aging on senso...
Session
Learning
Objectives
• Learn about the neuroscience literature on the aging brain.
• Learn about changes in the sen...
The
Aging
Brain
A “Sensthetic Model” – is a conceptual tool to think “across”
modalities that can help professionals and s...
The
Aging
Brain
Aging is characterized by many changes
that are reflected in the body, the various
sensory systems, and mo...
The
Aging
Brain
As the brain ages there are fundamental
changes which include changes in the
prefrontal cortex (responsibl...
The
Aging
Brain
The changes in the neurons and neurotransmitters, blood flow, and
development of new cells, reflects in th...
The
Aging
Brain
However the brain, which is inherently plastic, compensates for it’s
reduced ability in some areas by incr...
The
Aging
Brain
This ability for the brain to adapt and cope depends on lifestyle,
overall health, environment and genetic...
The
Aging
Brain
As designers we focus on the environment- however- it is important
to remember that as the brain is changi...
The
Aging
Brain
This implies that if we want to create environments for aging that
promote a healthy brain- and look at Ne...
The
Aging
Brain
In this presentation we will share findings from a literature review
on the aging brain and the aging chan...
Aging
Changes
the
Senses As you age, the way your senses (hearing,
vision, taste, smell, touch) give you
information about...
Aging
Changes
the
Senses
Your senses receive information from your
environment. This information can be in the
form of sou...
Aging
Changes
the
Senses
A certain amount of stimulation is required
before you become aware of a sensation.
This minimum ...
The Changing
Sensory System
All senses can be affected by aging, but
hearing and vision are most affected.
Cognitive
Supply &
Demand
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2838968/
Visual
Challenges
You may be less able to tolerate glare. Glare
such as from a shiny floor in a sunlit room
can make it di...
Visual
Solutions
As you age, it gets harder
to tell apart blues and
greens than it is to tell
apart reds and yellows.
Visual
Solutions
Using warm contrasting
colors (yellow, orange,
and red) can improve
your ability to see
Visual
Solutions
Keeping a red light on in darkened
rooms, such as the hallway or
bathroom, makes it easier to see than
us...
Visual
Solutions
Avoid Reflective Tiles
especially in public lobby
Visual
Solutions
Create thoughtful “Home Like”
Environment – Retro is not always
the way
Visual
Solutions
Use color and patterns to direct.
Visual
Solutions
Organic, free form patterns.
Visual
Solutions
Use ceiling lights and different
light levels and color to direct.
Auditory and Motor /
Balance Challenges
Our ears have two jobs. One is
hearing and the other is
maintaining balance.
As yo...
Motor performance deficits for older adults
appear to be due to dysfunction of the central
and peripheral nervous systems ...
Gait and balance problems are of particular interest as
falls are a major source of injury and morbidity in older
adults: ...
Approximately one-third of community-dwelling older adults fall each
year; the rate is doubled in senior group dwellings (...
Clear circulation/corridor systems
should be applied in the building
for older adults, as some of them
may have memory imp...
Corridors in the building for elderly people are suggested to be short, with
uninterrupted visual destinations or environm...
The location of utility/service
rooms in residences for older
adults should receive special
attention. The laundry room sh...
The usefulness of grab bars for fall
prevention has been recognized
(Sattin et al., 1998). In addition, door
handles or pu...
Irregular floor surfaces should be avoided and hard-surface flooring are
recommended as it improves standing balance and p...
The bathroom has been identified by older adults and researchers as the
most common site of environmental hazards (Carter ...
Regarding the kitchen design, adequate spaces facilitating different eating
routines are preferred (Percival, 2002). Squar...
Installing carefully designed stair handrails for stability is necessary; an
appropriate height and a proper section size ...
An elevator or stair lift may promote independence when an individual
becomes too disabled to use stairs, (Gilderbloom & M...
Lack of illumination appears to be related to poor postural stability among
older adults and may induce risks for falls (B...
Regarding interior colors, unsaturated and washed-out colors should be
avoided in the environments for older adults, as it...
Visual spatial cues can help older adults with declining memory recognize
places and respond to the surroundings. Sundermi...
Research by Perritt (2005) on carpet patterns showed that that high
contrasting patterns were associated with more inciden...
Auditory
Solutions
Use sounds to direct.
Tactile
Challenges
With aging, you may have reduced or changed sensations. These
changes can be related to decreased blood...
Tactile
Challenges
Older persons can develop an increased sensitivity to light touch
because of thinner skin.
Tactile
Challenges
Avoid reflective surfaces
Tactile
Challenges
Utilize Materials with texture
Multi-Sensory
Design
Solutions
It also appears that additional brain
regions can be activated in older adults
during cogni...
Multi-Sensory
Design
Solutions
Multisensory integration becomes more important during aging as it
helps to counteract the ...
Auditory and
Visual Solutions
Use vision and sounds to direct.
Auditory and
Visual Solutions
Use vision and sounds to direct.
Tactile and Visual
Solutions
Use vision and tactile to direct.
Solutions
Solutions
Solutions
Solutions
Solutions
Solutions
Solutions
Solutions
Culturally Sensitive
Solutions
Culturally Sensitive
Solutions
Culturally Sensitive
Solutions
Culturally Sensitive
The Concept of
“Sensthetics”
A “Sensthetic Model” – is a conceptual tool to think “across”
modalities that can help profes...
EFA_2015_Neuroarchitecture of Aging
EFA_2015_Neuroarchitecture of Aging
EFA_2015_Neuroarchitecture of Aging
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EFA_2015_Neuroarchitecture of Aging

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EFA_2015_Neuroarchitecture of Aging

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EFA_2015_Neuroarchitecture of Aging

  1. 1. WELCOME
  2. 2. The Neuroarchitecture of Aging and the “Sensthetic” Response Upali Nanda PhD, EDAC, Assoc. AIA, Director of Research, HKS Angela Lee AIA, ACHA, EDAC, LEED AP Zhe Wang, PhD, RA, EDAC, LEED AP BD+C
  3. 3. CE Information AIA - 23 Credit Hours available  Have the room monitor scan your conference badge before leaving each session you attend.  Keep a copy of the AIA CEU form for your records EDAC - 9 Credit Hours available  Certified Sessions: T01, T02, T03, E02, E04, E08, E09, E11, E17, E18, E20, E21, E22, E23, E24, E25, E26, E27, E28, E29, E31, E32, E41, E43, E44, E45.  The pre-conference does not qualify for EDAC credit.  It is the candidate’s responsibility to self-submit the credits online via Castle Worldwide Inc. Renewal notices with login instructions will be sent from Castle six months and three months prior to the candidate’s renewal date. Interior Designers - 23 Credit Hours available  Have your Verification Form STAMPED by the room monitor.  This is the only proof of attendance that will be accepted as proof of completion  This is a self-reporting system.  Contact your interior design association that is responsible for monitoring mandatory continuing education to fulfill membership requirements.
  4. 4. Reminders  New this year attendees will be able to fill in a session evaluation via the mobile app, please go to mobile app. Please take a moment to fill out the session survey, which can be accessed via the Mobile App:  Go to:  Find this session in the agenda  Click on the title to open the session  Click on “Session Survey” to access the survey.  To continue the conversation or to provide additional comments for this session, log into the EFA Mobile App and search for this session. Post a comment in the “CHATTER” section.  To access this presentation, log on to the EFA Mobile App, click on the session title under “Agenda” and the presentation will be located under “Collateral”.  If you have CE questions, please refer to the program guide for specific instructions.  If you were not scanned in for this session, please see the room monitor.
  5. 5. Session Description Neuroarchitecture is an emerging field. Understanding the aging brain and the impact of aging on sensory systems is key to developing responsive environments for the aging population. This presentation will look at cutting-edge research in the field of neuroscience and psycho-physiology and translate the research findings into design and architectural language that can be widely applied, thereby translating our “design response” that goes beyond the functional and the aesthetic, to the “sensthetic.”
  6. 6. Session Learning Objectives • Learn about the neuroscience literature on the aging brain. • Learn about changes in the sensory systems and the link to brain behavior. • Explore how all senses should be taken into account to design for a healthy brain. • Learn about specific multisensory design strategies that could be employed, regardless of type of setting, to respond to the aging brain.
  7. 7. The Aging Brain A “Sensthetic Model” – is a conceptual tool to think “across” modalities that can help professionals and students to design, study or experience sensory environments. It is a step beyond the aesthetics of appearance, towards a Sensthetics of Experience. Nanda, 2008
  8. 8. The Aging Brain Aging is characterized by many changes that are reflected in the body, the various sensory systems, and most critically, the brain itself.
  9. 9. The Aging Brain As the brain ages there are fundamental changes which include changes in the prefrontal cortex (responsible for key cognitive functions) and the hippocampus (responsible for memory and emotional processing).
  10. 10. The Aging Brain The changes in the neurons and neurotransmitters, blood flow, and development of new cells, reflects in the ability to learn new things, remember names, perform complex tasks of attention etc.
  11. 11. The Aging Brain However the brain, which is inherently plastic, compensates for it’s reduced ability in some areas by increasing abilities in others. Research study results suggest that low-performing older adults recruited a similar network as young adults but used it inefficiently, whereas high-performing older adults counteracted age-related neural decline through a plastic reorganization of neurocognitive networks. Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University
  12. 12. The Aging Brain This ability for the brain to adapt and cope depends on lifestyle, overall health, environment and genetics.
  13. 13. The Aging Brain As designers we focus on the environment- however- it is important to remember that as the brain is changing, there are simultaneous changes in the sensory systems: hearing (hearing loss, change in equilibrium), vision (sharpness, focus, toleration for glare, differentiation between colors, peripheral vision), smell and taste (atrophy in taste buds, reduced smell/taste perception), and touch (change in sensation and sensory thresholds).
  14. 14. The Aging Brain This implies that if we want to create environments for aging that promote a healthy brain- and look at Neuroarchitecture as a field, our “design response” must go beyond the functional and the aesthetic, to the “sensthetic”.
  15. 15. The Aging Brain In this presentation we will share findings from a literature review on the aging brain and the aging changes in the senses. Work by the NIH on this topic will serve as a foundation • http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/part-1-basics-healthy- brain/changing-brain-healthy-aging • http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/004013.htm
  16. 16. Aging Changes the Senses As you age, the way your senses (hearing, vision, taste, smell, touch) give you information about the world changes. Your senses become less sharp and you may have trouble telling apart details.
  17. 17. Aging Changes the Senses Your senses receive information from your environment. This information can be in the form of sound, light, smells, tastes, and touch. This information is converted to nerve signals and carried to the brain. There, it is turned into a meaningful sensation.
  18. 18. Aging Changes the Senses A certain amount of stimulation is required before you become aware of a sensation. This minimum level is called the threshold. Aging increases this threshold. So the amount of stimulation needed for you to be aware of the sensation becomes greater.
  19. 19. The Changing Sensory System All senses can be affected by aging, but hearing and vision are most affected.
  20. 20. Cognitive Supply & Demand http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2838968/
  21. 21. Visual Challenges You may be less able to tolerate glare. Glare such as from a shiny floor in a sunlit room can make it difficult to get around indoors. You may have trouble adapting to darkness or bright light
  22. 22. Visual Solutions As you age, it gets harder to tell apart blues and greens than it is to tell apart reds and yellows.
  23. 23. Visual Solutions Using warm contrasting colors (yellow, orange, and red) can improve your ability to see
  24. 24. Visual Solutions Keeping a red light on in darkened rooms, such as the hallway or bathroom, makes it easier to see than using a regular night light.
  25. 25. Visual Solutions Avoid Reflective Tiles especially in public lobby
  26. 26. Visual Solutions Create thoughtful “Home Like” Environment – Retro is not always the way
  27. 27. Visual Solutions Use color and patterns to direct.
  28. 28. Visual Solutions Organic, free form patterns.
  29. 29. Visual Solutions Use ceiling lights and different light levels and color to direct.
  30. 30. Auditory and Motor / Balance Challenges Our ears have two jobs. One is hearing and the other is maintaining balance. As you age, structures inside the ear start to change and their functions decline. Your ability to pick up sounds decreases. You may also have problems maintaining your balance as you sit, stand, and walk.
  31. 31. Motor performance deficits for older adults appear to be due to dysfunction of the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as the neuromuscular system. Motor performance deficits include coordination difficulty (Seidler et al., 2002), increased variability of movement (Contreras-Vidal et al., 1998; Darling et al., 1989), slowing of movement (Diggles- Buckles, 1993), and difficulties with balance and gait (Tang & Woollacott, 1996) in comparison to young adults. The Brain And Balance
  32. 32. Gait and balance problems are of particular interest as falls are a major source of injury and morbidity in older adults: 20-30% of older adults who fall suffer moderate to severe injuries that limit mobility and reduce quality of life (Alexander et al., 1992). Older adults exhibit greater spatial and temporal movement variability, resulting in less consistent actions as compared to young adults (Contreras-Vidal et al., 1998; Cooke et al., 1989; Darling et al., 1989). The Brain And Balance
  33. 33. Approximately one-third of community-dwelling older adults fall each year; the rate is doubled in senior group dwellings (Gillespie et al., 2001; Jensen et al., 2002). Even without injury, falls may cause a loss of self-confidence and result in reduced active behavior and increased dependency among older adults (Gallagher et al., 2001). Falls have been identified by the elderly as the most significant barrier to active behavior (Wilcox et al., 2003). Risk for Falls
  34. 34. Clear circulation/corridor systems should be applied in the building for older adults, as some of them may have memory impairment or suffer mental problems. Different function zones should be separated and applied with distinct design factors (e.g., colors and styles) to aid in place recognition. Fall Prevention Image source: aiatopten.org
  35. 35. Corridors in the building for elderly people are suggested to be short, with uninterrupted visual destinations or environmental cues; short and clear corridors has been found to be more navigable for older adults than long corridors (AIA, 1985; Brawley, 1992; Goldsmith, 1996; Passini et al., 2000). Fall Prevention Image sources: www.thewatersseniorliving.com; faulknerdesign.com
  36. 36. The location of utility/service rooms in residences for older adults should receive special attention. The laundry room should be located on the bedroom or bathroom level of the residence … (Haslam et al., 2001). The location of a storage room may depend on its function. Fall Prevention
  37. 37. The usefulness of grab bars for fall prevention has been recognized (Sattin et al., 1998). In addition, door handles or push bars, instead of knobs, should be installed in residences for older adults (Gilderbloom & Markham, 1996). Fall Prevention
  38. 38. Irregular floor surfaces should be avoided and hard-surface flooring are recommended as it improves standing balance and postural stability (Redfern et al., 1997; Thies et al., 2005). High-density and low-pile commercial-grade carpeting has been suggested as a safe flooring material for healthy older adults (Dickinson et al., 2002). Fall Prevention
  39. 39. The bathroom has been identified by older adults and researchers as the most common site of environmental hazards (Carter et al., 1997; Huang, 2005). Besides slip-resistant floor surfaces, sliding glass shower doors should be avoided (Murphy et al., 2006). Walk-in shower stalls or bathtubs with rails, raised toilet seats, and wide clearances have been suggested for elderly users (Jenkins et al., 1997; Percival, 2002). Fall Prevention Image source: 4.bp.blogspot.com
  40. 40. Regarding the kitchen design, adequate spaces facilitating different eating routines are preferred (Percival, 2002). Square-shaped kitchens may seem more spacious, compared to linear-shaped kitchens. Boschetti (2002) recommended an L-shape layout for kitchens used by the elderly, as it affords a corner to lean against. Fall Prevention
  41. 41. Installing carefully designed stair handrails for stability is necessary; an appropriate height and a proper section size of the handrails should be applied. -- closed risers, consistent riser heights, appropriate short riser and long tread, coarser tread surface textures.) Fall Prevention
  42. 42. An elevator or stair lift may promote independence when an individual becomes too disabled to use stairs, (Gilderbloom & Markham, 1996). However, Simoneau et al. (1999) found changes in stable visual anchors, as when exiting an elevator cage, may create risks for falls among older adults. This risk may be exacerbated by dim lighting in the elevator cage. Fall Prevention Image source: elevatorplanning.com uniqueelevator.com
  43. 43. Lack of illumination appears to be related to poor postural stability among older adults and may induce risks for falls (Brooke-Wavell et al., 2002; De Lepeleire et al., 2007). Furthermore, changes in light levels should be smooth, as older adults need more time to adapt to changes in light levels than younger adults (Brabyn et al., 2000). Fall Prevention Image sources: docs.unrealengine.com; sundancelandscaping.com
  44. 44. Regarding interior colors, unsaturated and washed-out colors should be avoided in the environments for older adults, as it is difficult for them to discriminate these colors and color confusion may result in falls (Brabyn et al., 2000). In addition, an appropriate contrast between colors of the wall and the floor, and floor surfaces at different levels emphasizes the edges of spaces and help older adults distinguish features of the environment. Fall Prevention Image source: sites.google.com/
  45. 45. Visual spatial cues can help older adults with declining memory recognize places and respond to the surroundings. Sundermier, et al. (1996) noted that specially designed elements in the space can be used as cues by older adults while moving around and be helpful to prevent falls. Fall Prevention Image sources: idassociates.com; faulknerdesign.com
  46. 46. Research by Perritt (2005) on carpet patterns showed that that high contrasting patterns were associated with more incidents (stumbles, reaching for handrail, veering, purposeful stepping, pausing, stopping) than carpeting with low color contrast patterns. Bonato and Bubka (2011) found that viewing high contrast static patterns (black and white squares laid out in regular patterns on a rug) can induce motion sickness. In a recent correlation study by Calkins (2012), it was found that vinyl flooring with medium size pattern (1”- 6”) was associated with greater falls than no pattern, small pattern (6”). These few studies suggest that floor glare and pattern may contribute to falls. However, the underlying relationship, and ideal condition for each, demands more research.” Fall Prevention
  47. 47. Auditory Solutions Use sounds to direct.
  48. 48. Tactile Challenges With aging, you may have reduced or changed sensations. These changes can be related to decreased blood flow to the nerve endings or to the spinal cord or brain. The spinal cord transmits nerve signals and the brain interprets the signals. After age 50, many people have reduced sensitivity to pain. Or you may feel and recognize pain, but it does not bother you. For example, when you are injured, you may not know how severe the injury is because the pain does not trouble you.
  49. 49. Tactile Challenges Older persons can develop an increased sensitivity to light touch because of thinner skin.
  50. 50. Tactile Challenges Avoid reflective surfaces
  51. 51. Tactile Challenges Utilize Materials with texture
  52. 52. Multi-Sensory Design Solutions It also appears that additional brain regions can be activated in older adults during cognitive tasks, such as taking a memory test. Researchers do not fully understand why this happens, but one idea is that the brain engages mechanisms to compensate for difficulties that certain regions may be having. For example, the brain may recruit alternate brain networks in order to perform a task.
  53. 53. Multi-Sensory Design Solutions Multisensory integration becomes more important during aging as it helps to counteract the often-destructive consequences of unisensory deterioration. Mozolic et al. (2012)
  54. 54. Auditory and Visual Solutions Use vision and sounds to direct.
  55. 55. Auditory and Visual Solutions Use vision and sounds to direct.
  56. 56. Tactile and Visual Solutions Use vision and tactile to direct.
  57. 57. Solutions
  58. 58. Solutions
  59. 59. Solutions
  60. 60. Solutions
  61. 61. Solutions
  62. 62. Solutions
  63. 63. Solutions
  64. 64. Solutions Culturally Sensitive
  65. 65. Solutions Culturally Sensitive
  66. 66. Solutions Culturally Sensitive
  67. 67. Solutions Culturally Sensitive
  68. 68. The Concept of “Sensthetics” A “Sensthetic Model” – is a conceptual tool to think “across” modalities that can help professionals and students to design, study or experience sensory environments. It is a step beyond the aesthetics of appearance, towards a Sensthetics of Experience. Nanda, 2008

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