Citizen Science and Dialogue

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  • Introduce self…thank Kate and Jennifer, and participants - then agenda
  • David to try and provide a conceptual framework for the motivations of why the ISE field might want to combine citsci and dialogue. Kate will share ways that they combined elements of citizen science and dialogue as part of the C3 project. Jennifer to discuss PPSR from the scientist-practitioner perspective as well as present some findings from an audit of the field. I will return briefly, time permitting, to share our efforts at the Museum of Science. Then we will get valuable feedback from all of you through a small group activity, followed by reporting out and questions and answers.
  • The Institute of Museum and Library Services’ recent 21 st Century Skills Document issued a call for Museums to empower citizens in addressing issues that are of import to their communities, by cultivating the skills of “ information, communications and technology literacy, critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, civic literacy, and global awareness. ” The citizen science movement, led by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, has become a success in recent years around issues such as ornithology, biodiversity, and water quality, by engaging the public to participate in scientific research by acting as data collectors, interpreters, and thought partners around issues affecting the environment. Citizen science, also known as “ public participation in scientific research ” (PPSR), is a strategic area for science centers as demonstrated in ASTC’s recent Communicating Climate Change (C3) project. A nascent movement, known as “ community-based participatory research ” (CBPR) has arisen to engage the public in working with researchers to identify and characterize issues of importance to local communities, highlight disparities or areas of strength, or consider potential questions that might be addressed through policy change. Science centers are a potentially powerful force in connecting community members with scientific researchers, and in convening conversations among the public around the issues addressed by the work of CPBR researchers. By engaging subsets of the public around socio-scientific issues that are of particular relevance to their communities, science centers can reach historically underserved and underrepresented audiences, while cultivating critical 21 st Century skills among the participants. ASTC and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology are working establish a Community of Practice among science centers around “ citizen science and dialogue”, connecting the engagement that happens through citizen science with conversations around the overarching societal issues with the broader public.
  • Preliminary PES report from CAISE. Looked at a number of projects and ranked them along dimensions from PUS-side to PES-side. M is Cambridge Nano Forums, J was community science, the idea of the public sparking citizen science projects around issues relevant to their communities. Connecting these two might produce what we in New England might refer to as “wicked” engagement. Launch of PES CoP at 10:30 tomorrow - not at Hotel, but rather in room 315 at the convention center.
  • Utilizing the scientific process to: • make science fun and: • exercise critical and systems thinking skills to: • engage scientists and stakeholders with diverse publics in an effort to: • spark respectful, informed conversations, thereby: • providing interactions that have substantive value for all who participate while: • concurrently aiming to advance scientific and social knowledge and understanding around issues that are of import to society: • and instill in all participants habitual thinking skills that they apply to all issues they encounter.
  • Citizen Science and Dialogue

    1. 1. Citizen Science and Dialogue: Engaging Diverse Communities around Scientific Issues in Society Kate Crawford Jennifer Lynn Shirk David Sittenfeld
    2. 2. <ul><li>Session Agenda </li></ul><ul><li>Presentations: </li></ul><ul><li>Overview, David Sittenfeld </li></ul><ul><li>Communicating Climate Change, Kate Crawford </li></ul><ul><li>PPSR/opportunities for dialogue, Jennifer Shirk </li></ul><ul><li>Toxic Traffic, David Sittenfeld </li></ul><ul><li>Small Group Discussions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reporting Out </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Questions and Answers </li></ul>
    3. 3. Citizen Science and Dialogue: Toronto Declaration at 5th SCWC, 2008: “ We will actively seek out issues related to science and society where the voices of citizens should be heard and ensure that dialogue occurs.”
    4. 4.   Complementary methods of public engagement Often oriented around issues of relevance to communities   Increases relevance and keeps science fun May help to justify conversations around socio-scientific issues, given the constraints of ISE institutions   Citizen Science  and Dialogue     Many Experts, Many Audiences Center For Advancement of ISE, 2009
    5. 5. Utilizing the Scientific Process to: Make Science Fun while: exercising critical and systems thinking skills to: engage scientists and stakeholders with diverse publics in an effort to: spark respectful, informed conversations , thereby: providing interactions that have substantive value for all who participate while: concurrently aiming to advance scientific and social knowledge and public understanding around issues that are of import to society .

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