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Technology for liberal education: the state of the art

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Materials for an AAC&U conference workshop in January 2016.
We touched on a wide range of topics, from the LMS to mobile devices and social media.

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Technology for liberal education: the state of the art

  1. 1. Technology for liberal educationTechnology for liberal education
  2. 2. Technology for liberal education: the state of the art AAC&U annual conference January 2016
  3. 3. Today’s plan 1.Introductions 2.Technology overview 3.Tools 4.Approaches 5.Next steps
  4. 4. Who are you? •Your name, institution, and role concerning technology
  5. 5. Who is this very hairy person? •Researcher, writer, professor, consultant, speaker, futurist
  6. 6. nitle.orgnitle.org
  7. 7. Communities of practice Research Joint projects Outreach
  8. 8.  Network platform: events f2f/online  Partnerships  Translation
  9. 9. Ground rules for today • Comments and questions gleefully welcomed. • Social media use celebrated and possibly exploited. • Please avoid technobabble.
  10. 10. Ground rules for today • Chinese restaurant menu metaphor • If we go too fast, stomp on the brakes.
  11. 11. Technology trendsTechnology trends  Rise of the stacks  Post- Snowden  Hardware + networks: multiple ecosystems  Digitization
  12. 12. Technology trendsTechnology trends  digital video  cloud wars  augmented reality  automation and artificial intelligence
  13. 13. Technology trendsTechnology trends social media triumphing
  14. 14. Technology ecosystemTechnology ecosystem
  15. 15. Design for mobile *first *
  16. 16.  PCs getting crowded out  Mouse and keyboard declining  3d printing mainstreaming  3d tv dying
  17. 17. 2. Tools for learning https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/15984700386/
  18. 18. The LMS Uses • Copyright control (TEACH Act) • Content hosting (lead use) • Basic pedagogies • Safe space for student and instructor expression
  19. 19. The LMS Functions • Hosts course materials (instructor’s, e-reserves) • Class information • Discussion boards • Quizzes • Other optional functions
  20. 20. The LMS The state of play • % with 1+ LMSes (Casey) • Blackboard dominates, barely • Open source options (Moodle) • Modern web version (Canvas)
  21. 21. The ePortfolio https://www.flickr.com/photos/cogdog/163592587/
  22. 22. The ePortfolio Advantages • Evidence of learning and growth • Metacognition through longitudinal reflection • Deepens audience understanding of learner • Don’t talk to me - go to AAEEBL!
  23. 23. Video • Consumption • Production • Videoconference
  24. 24. Robotics • Students building • Career paths https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/22982166705/
  25. 25. Telepresence bots
  26. 26. Big data and data analyticsBig data and data analytics  Improve student outcomes  Adaptive learning  Integration w/assessment
  27. 27. Uses of social media •Student work •Faculty work •Staff development •Research
  28. 28. New learning spaces • Smart classrooms • Reconfigurable classes • Learner-centered “ • The commons • http://learningspacetoolkit.org
  29. 29. 3d printing in higher education https://www.flickr.com/photos/cogdog/7729488378/
  30. 30. Reasons to do 3d visualization • teaching • also research and creative work http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_printed_Spinosaurus_skulls.jpg
  31. 31. Reasons to do 3d making stuff • Prototyping • Design thinking • Sheer creativity • https:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2MSXho_KlU Save $$ in object purchasing and replacement
  32. 32. Which academic fields? • Classical studies and archaeology • History (ex: http:// digital.vpr.net/post/students-recreate-hist ) • Creative arts (i.e., fashion, studio art, theater) • Engineering • Robotics
  33. 33. Which academic fields? • Math • Geography and geology • Life sciences, allied health fields • Media studies ("critical making") • Business (study impact; new opportunities)
  34. 34. Strategic questions • What type of institution? (research vs engineering vs CC vs LAC) • Which disciplines show interest? • Is interest aimed at research or teaching? • Will you partner with off-campus interest and/or support?
  35. 35. Campus sites • Library • Makerspace (Abilene Christian University, http://go.nmc.org/rema) • 3d lab • Professor’s office
  36. 36. Campus sites • Departmental office • Multiple sites (Northeastern: https:// soundcloud.com/educause/cni-podc ) • Other…?
  37. 37. Operational questions • Who owns the printing ecosystem? • Do you charge users? (intra-preneurial possibility)
  38. 38. 3. Approaches https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/14160813606/
  39. 39. blended/flipped classroomblended/flipped classroom  Technologies: video, audio  Pedagogies: shift to discussion, other interactive learning forms
  40. 40. distance learning growsdistance learning grows  numbers keep building  pedagogies improve  LACs experiment
  41. 41. MOOCsMOOCs
  42. 42.  Credit for MOOCs  STEM vs humanities  Sustainability?  pedagogical exploration
  43. 43. The open revolutionThe open revolution  Open education  Open access scholarship  Mandates (Trinity U example)
  44. 44. Mobile In class? • Clickers pedagogy • Scribes • Response index • Variable use
  45. 45. Mobile Out of class • Immense increase in access • Changed socialization • Media capture, use, sharing pedagogy
  46. 46. rise of the net.generations  Greater outreach  Collaborative pedagogy  Constructivist “  Teach away from bad habits
  47. 47. On to digital literacy - 2015
  48. 48. Selected principles Yes, technical skills are required. Ensure a baseline: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/DigitalLiteracy/basiccurriculum.aspx
  49. 49. Selected principles Information literacy: “a set of abilities requiring individuals to ‘recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.’” -Association of College and Research Libraries
  50. 50. https://www.flickr.com/photos/ergonomic/3402981862/
  51. 51. https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/5968799566/
  52. 52. Selected principles Computational thinking: “a way of solving problems, designing systems, and understanding human behavior that draws on concepts fundamental to computer science. To flourish in today's world, computational thinking has to be a fundamental part of the way people think and understand the world. “ -Carnegie-Mellon University
  53. 53. https://www.flickr.com/photos/mrsdkrebs/16164384034/
  54. 54. Selected principles Computational thinking “Computational thinking means creating and making use of different levels of abstraction, to understand and solve problems more effectively.“ -Carnegie-Mellon University
  55. 55. Selected principles Computational thinking “means thinking algorithmically and with the ability to apply mathematical concepts such as induction to develop more efficient, fair, and secure solutions.” Carnegie-Mellon University
  56. 56. Selected principles At least a glancing familiarity with coding
  57. 57. Selected principles https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/85997668/
  58. 58. Selected principles Active, productive student work “Education should not be about merely learning how to consume; education should be about becoming an active participant in the major communication functions of society. Just as we not only teach students to read, but we also teach them how to write, how to assemble their writings into forms others will want to read, how to speak publicly, etc., in a digital age we need to teach our students how to author and distribute digital works.” -Howard Besser, http://tcla.gseis.ucla.edu/divide/politics/besser.html
  59. 59. At a different level The best digital literacy is storytelling https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6yVCgoBn-I
  60. 60. At a different level • Integrativ e • Creative • Voice https://twitter.com/williams_war
  61. 61. Digital literacy is a futures practice
  62. 62. Digital literacy applies to non-digital domains • Impacts non-digital information flows • Alters spaces • Makes students - citizens - harder to manage
  63. 63. Digital literacy is socially and politically insurgent https://www.flickr.com/photos/77688862@N02/20014884218/
  64. 64. Digital literacy is socially and politically insurgent • In the classroom • In the community • About policy
  65. 65. Gaming world
  66. 66. Gaming as part of mainstreamGaming as part of mainstream cultureculture  Median age of gamers shoots past 30  Industry size comparable to music  Impacts on hardware, software, interfaces, other industries  Large and growing diversity of platforms, topics, genres, niches, players
  67. 67. Games serious, public, and political • Oiligarchy, Molle Industries • Jetset, Persuasive Games • The Great Shakeout, California • DimensionM, Tabula Digita
  68. 68. Classroom and courses  Curriculum content  Delivery mechanism  Creating games Peacemaker, Impact Games Revolution (via Jason Mittell)
  69. 69. Example: Duolingo
  70. 70. •Joost Raessens and Jeffrey Goldstein, eds, Handbook of Computer Game Studies (MIT, 2005) •Frans Mayra, An Introduction to Game Studies (Sage, 2008) •Pat Harrigan and Noah Wardrip-Fruin, eds. Third Person: Authoring and Exploring Vast Narratives (MIT, 2009) Game studies as academic fieldGame studies as academic field
  71. 71. How is gaming used now?How is gaming used now?
  72. 72. Use games to impact society
  73. 73. Some impacts on campusesSome impacts on campuses  Changes in hardware, software  Part of undergraduate life  Learning content, both informal and formal  Career paths
  74. 74. 4. Next steps • FLICKR PHOTO
  75. 75. The CIO POV 1. Information Security 2. Optimizing Educational Technology “In 2016, higher education IT organizations are divesting themselves of technologies that can be sourced elsewhere and of practices that have become inefficient and are reinvesting to develop the necessary capabilities and resources to use information technology to achieve competitive institutional differentiation in student success, affordability, and teaching and research excellence.” •http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/1/top-10-it-issues-2016
  76. 76. Selected challengesSelected challenges  Attracting skilled staff  Keeping up w/changes  Digital security threats growing (ex: Rutgers)  Changes in library role
  77. 77. Selected challengesSelected challenges Costs  Always pilot  Student labor  Open source  Inter-institutional collaboration
  78. 78. http://bryanalexander.orghttp://bryanalexander.org bryan.alexander@gmail.combryan.alexander@gmail.com http://twitter.com/bryanalexanderhttp://twitter.com/bryanalexander

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