Bruce L. Mims, Ed.D

1
Today’s Topics…
 These procedures are NOT your Safe School Plan…
 They can be a part of it
 These are specific tools an...
Why is this important?
 FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin (September, 2010)…
“…Information in the first few moments may be sca...
Personal, Local, Immediate
Relevance…
Man hunting coyote prompts Waukesha West H.S. lockdown(WI)
fox6now.com ^ | 22 May, 2...
Personal, Local, Immediate
Relevance (Cont’d)…
THE ISSUE: District 44 reviews BB gun incident
10/04/2012
OUR VIEW: School ...
Pre-Quiz/Test your Knowledge
Let’s find our baseline …

Select the best possible answer…

6
During a lockdown, you should…
Ensure the hallways are empty
B. Lock the doors and turn off the lights
C. Keep students qu...
The Correct Answers are…
 A, B, and C are all acceptable responses…remember to

ignore alarms and bells, verify attendanc...
When a “Shelter in Place” is required, you
should…

Crawl under your desk and assume the fetal position
B. Turn off the li...
The Correct Answer is…
 D – Shelter in Place refers to a potential danger

outside
 Hence, you would want everyone to se...
Question: when conducting "Student- Parent
Reunifications”, you should…
Have clear and concise instructions
B. Make sure t...
The Correct Answer is…
 A, B, AND D

 Getting students off the school site is indeed

important, but it must be done in ...
A Setting for an Emergency…

 Little River Middle School (fictitious)
 Little River MS City population – 5,000+
 No act...
Scenario
 Sometime shortly after lunch a visitor who had just parked in the

school parking lot and was walking to the sc...
Additional Information…
 The “danger zone” appears to be limited to the school parking lot
 No other witnesses appear to...
Problem Summary
 A student has been shot and injured on
school grounds.
 Questions:


How to we ensure the safety of ot...
Adult/Supervisory Response to
Immediate Threat…
 What is your responsibility?
 Act and react
 Perform as you were train...
Emergency Lockdown
 Lockdown: Use when there is an immediate threat of

violence in, or immediately around, the school
 ...
Lockdown Decision
Considerations…
 Is there an immediate threat to the safety and security of students and

staff?
 Can ...
Lockdown Procedure
 Students on playground, in halls and restrooms move to







the nearest classroom.
Classroom ...
Things to remember while in
lockdown…
 Lockdown means LOCKDOWN
 Nobody comes in nobody goes out


Until you are given a...
Lockdown
Considerations/Complications
 Students may not be locked in in regular classroom…how







to coordinate ...
Additional considerations…
 When in lockdown…
 There is no time for heroic measures—heroics are for law

enforcement and...
Discussion/Group Work…
 Why is Lockdown planning important?

 Does your site currently have procedures in
place for lock...
Lockdown Preparedness…
 What are strengths of

our plan?
 ___________________
 ___________________
 __________________...
Lockdown Preparedness
 What do we do next?
 _________________________
 _________________________
 ____________________...
Questions, answers, and
comments…

28
Extraordinary Circumstances: “Hit
the Deck”
 Anyone recognizing immediate danger shouts “Hit the

Deck”
 Everyone immedi...
Hit the Deck (cont’d)
 This response is usually used in the event of gunfire.

Usually followed by Lock down or evacuatio...
Procedures and Supplies
Shelter In Place…
 This response is used for hazardous materials in the

environment.
 Shelter in-place would also be us...
Shelter In Place: Procedures
 Move everyone inside. (interior rooms on upper
level floors).
 Close and lock all windows ...
Additional Considerations…
 Are there adequate and accurate maps and floor plans

of your building?
 All doors and windo...
“Go-Kit” Handout…
 Things to consider…

35
Here’s what many schools are
doing in addition…
 Individual Child Emergency Kits…
 Cover letter to parents…

 “…Please ...
Discussion/Group Work…
 What supplies will classrooms need if the





lockdown/shelter-in-place lasts several hours?...
Discussion/Group Work…
 Do you currently have emergency supplies on

hand at your site?
 School?
 Every classroom?
 Wh...
Shelter In-Place Preparedness…
 What are strengths of

our plan?
 __________________
 __________________
 ____________...
Shelter In-Place Preparedness
 What do we do next?
 _________________________
 _________________________
 ____________...
Emergency Supply Readiness…
 What are the strengths









of our on-site Emergency
Supplies?
________________
__...
What do we need to do next?
 ____________________________
 ____________________________
 ____________________________

...
Media, Staff, and Parents
Communication Considerations
 Public information is critical
 Establish protocols in advance for communicating timely

a...
Communication Considerations: School Staff
 Use plain language to communicate during an

emergency

 (Sometimes) “less i...
Communication Considerations: School Staff
 Develop a communication plan for

lockdown situations
 Consider emergency pl...
Communication Considerations: Parents
 Provide information on emergency response procedures
 Reunification procedures:

...
Communication Considerations: Media
 Assign a single Public Information or “go-to” person” to handle







media inq...
Student-Parent Reunification
 Clear and concise parent expectations are imperative:
 Photo ID required
 Students only r...
Additional Considerations for Reunification…
 You will be dealing with emotions…
 From parents
 From students
 Your ow...
Discussion/Group Work…
 Does your site currently have communication protocols in place in

the event of an emergency?
 D...
Communication and Reunification
Preparedness…
 What are strengths of

our plan?
 ___________________
 _________________...
Communication and Reunification
Preparedness
 What do we do next?
 _________________________
 _________________________...
Overview of Incident Management Systems and Structures
Incident Command
 A commonly accepted plan for disaster incident
management that assigns tasks and allows for
rapid, expe...
From NIMS to (local) relevance…
 National Incident Management System is an

important set of measures designed to create ...
Incident Command—when do we
use it?
 When the event at the site is or has the potential to
become an immediate threat
 L...
Incident Command v Site-Based
Decision Making…
 Incident Command entails a successive chain of leadership (“chain of

com...
Incident Command System: District
or (large) site—per: NIMS
Incident
Command

Liaison Officer

Safety Officer

Public
Info...
Reality: Incident Command Structure at a
small school site
Incident
Commander
(Principal)
Public Information
Officer
(Scho...
Site-Based Incident Command
Incident Commander
 Is in charge of any crisis until appropriate emergency

responder arrives...
Site-based Incident Command
 Safety and Operations
 Most likely and Assistant Principal, Senior or Lead Teacher

In some...
Operations Teams
 Student Safety (Teachers, Nurse)
 Search and rescue, triage

 Logistics (Maintenance, support staff )...
Incident Command Staging Areas—
Examples
 Command Post—Incident Commander
 Principal’s Office
 Media/Communication
 Li...
Recovery…
 The primary objective of the recovery
 Return to learning and restore the infrastructure as







quick...
Reflection and Dialogue
 ICS Reality Check
 What do you currently have in place…



As a district?
As a school site?

...
Incident Command Readiness…
 What are strengths of

our plan?
 __________________
 __________________
 _______________...
Incident Command Readiness..
 What do we do next?
 _________________________
 _________________________
 _____________...
Little River Middle School--redux
Little River Middle School…

 Little River Middle School (fictitious)
 Little River MS City population – 5,000+
 No act...
Scenario
 Sometime shortly after lunch a visitor who had just parked in the

school parking lot and was walking to the sc...
Additional Information…
 The “danger zone” appears to be limited to the school parking lot
 No other witnesses appear to...
Problem Summary
 A student has been shot and injured on
school grounds.
 Questions:


How to we ensure the safety of ot...
The Emergency Unfolds: Actions
Taken
 The office staff called 911 and the Principal.
 The Principal made the decision to...
Questions for Thought and
Discussion
 Was the decision to go into lockdown a good one? Why?
 Should someone go out inves...
Messages…
 911 dispatch informs school that EMS should arrive on

scene w/in 30 minutes
 Police are en-route but they ar...
Scenario gets trickier…
 20 minutes into lockdown and after receiving update email

from office, one of the English teach...
Additional Questions
 Does this information impact your current response actions in any

way?
 What communications need ...
Reflection and Dialogue(cont’d)…
 What are your possibilities and feasibilities in terms of your

planning in general?
 ...
Thank you…
For More Information…
Excell Education Innovations
Bruce L. Mims, Ed.D
www.ExcellEducationInnovations.com
Excel...
Evaluation
 Which idea or topic did you find the most useful or helpful?
 Which did you find the least helpful?
 Overal...
Lockdown workshop master
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  • Talking point: Lockdown is a very serious site and school climate changing event; sometimes a lockdown emergency alters a career or two. In urban settings, YES, these events happen frequently: some districts train for them, some do not; those that train implement a lockdown with very little fanfare—except for the media buzz; those that do not train or prepare run into emergency situations that can and do unravel in a very public and ugly fashion—seen by many (millions). In rural settings, it may never happen; but it may happen ONCE. These events are not to be disregarded as something that happens “out there”, they can happen anywhere and they do happen EVERYWHERE. Events will occur or unfold suddenly and in rapid or cascading succession. The challenge is to know what to do and what not to do if and when it becomes necessary to initiate a lockdown etc. to ensure the safety and security of students and staff members…
  • Establishing locus of concern that lockdown emergencies happen anywhere; rural emergencies happen more often than not. Yes, we hear about the ones in big cities because local media covers them quite extensively; however, these types of events occur more frequently and more often that the urban emergencies…
  • Talk about discretionary or modified measures related to lockdown…
  • Story time about first week as a high school principal in LAUSD; had to put the school in a full lockdown because of report of weapon on the campus; none of the admin other than me had ever conducted a lockdown drill and had NO protocols, so they were in a panic; there W/T voices made everyone tense, when tense com w/ me, my responses were in a calm voice (even though I was screaming inside because my staff was woefully unprepared for emergencies); steady calm got everyone through, kept teachers calm (even though they themselves had no clue of what to do); a lot was on the line (primarily my career that day), but calm and orderly demeanor got us to the end-game search where we indeed found the weapon in a locker, secured from lockdown, and released from school only FIVE minutes late…
  • Good way to shift some responsibilities to shared-cost; also effective in ensuring you have enough supplies for every child
  • Discussion time: 5-7 minutes with Plus Delta Slides guiding their dialogue…
  • Communication in a crisis is imperative. However, less is more; relevant is enough. Questions of culpability should not be answered in the face of inquiry; acknowledge, validate, blanket statement—e.g., “we are looking into every aspect
  • Talking point: ICS may occur as a natural course of action within the scope and context of a crisis event. If nothing else, know who the Incident Commander is; the IC is the person who will probably be the point person with information and instructions; always best to assume if there is a lockdown, the Incident Commander is leading at that time. Most cases, site leader and IC are the same person; however, sometimes they are not…
  • Talking point: this is the “Framework” but ICS can be as simple or complex as it needs to be to serve the needs of the site or district
  • Talking point: if nothing else is in the ICS there is an Incident Commander. In most cases, this person is the Site Principal; however, in many cases it may be an administrator who deals with discipline and guidance. In any case, once an event such as a lockdown occurs, its safe to assume whomever is communicating instructions and information to you is the defacto Incident Commander, AND the site is operating under and Incident Command structure for the duration of the event
  • Lockdown workshop master

    1. 1. Bruce L. Mims, Ed.D 1
    2. 2. Today’s Topics…  These procedures are NOT your Safe School Plan…  They can be a part of it  These are specific tools and measures that will help you navigate through an immediate lockdown or shelter in-place emergency situation at your site  And get children safely and securely reunited with their loved ones  Today’s objective is for you and/or your site team to actively reflect upon your current readiness  Lockdown, Shelter In-Place, Communication/Re-Unification, and Incident Command  Work together as a team to assess and dialogue about how you evolve from where you are now to where you think you need to be in terms of readiness 2
    3. 3. Why is this important?  FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin (September, 2010)… “…Information in the first few moments may be scant, fragmentary, and sometimes ambiguous. If lockdown is ordered swiftly and clearly in large schools, the associated protective factors take effect almost immediately…”  [However]“…Many rural schools are located in small, isolated towns served by only state police or sheriff’s departments. The far-flung patrol responsibilities and limited staff levels of those agencies make a 20- to 30-minute response time an optimistic best-case scenario; in reality, it may take 45 minutes to an hour before authorities arrive…”  [Therefore]“…An effective response requires school-specific planning and coordination grounded in local conditions. To open a discussion on and promote the development of options for action during those first few minutes when hiding quietly and waiting for help may not be viable are paramount goals for all communities…”  3
    4. 4. Personal, Local, Immediate Relevance… Man hunting coyote prompts Waukesha West H.S. lockdown(WI) fox6now.com ^ | 22 May, 2012 | Katie DeLong Posted on Wednesday, May 23, 2012 5:34:24 AM WAUKESHA — Waukesha West High School was put on lockdown Tuesday morning, May 22nd after Waukesha police got a report of a man with a gun. As it turned out, there was a man with a .22 rifle in the area who was apparently hunting a coyote. The school was on lockdown for just under a half-hour. Officials say no one was hurt. BTW: Waukesha West High School serves an unincorporated rural area of Waukesha, WI (population 7500) 4
    5. 5. Personal, Local, Immediate Relevance (Cont’d)… THE ISSUE: District 44 reviews BB gun incident 10/04/2012 OUR VIEW: School staff made the right calls, and incident policy is sound The contingency plan was in place. The unexpected happened, the plan went into action and played out as intended. Ideally, the unexpected never occurs, but when surprises arise, it's comforting to know the advance work was not in vein. Folks in Streator (Il) know the story well by now, but here again are the pertinent details: “…At 8:15 a.m. Sept. 21, a Friday, Northlawn Junior High School administrators learned there was a BB gun in the building. As per the school's emergency plan, classrooms were placed on soft lockdown. Police were called immediately, and school officials located the gun, in two separate parts, in two students' lockers. The students were disciplined according to district policy. The lockdown ended after 25 minutes….One positive thing that came out of it, at the end of the day we met as a staff and debriefed and talked about things that we could improve on, Nuckles said. "There were some learning experiences as a staff. We realize in our changing schools (situations) do happen so we want to be prepared if they ever did…It sounds as if school officials are making the best of the situation. Other schools in the district will benefit as well, without having to experience the incident firsthand. Parents need to know and trust that school officials make student safety the top priority. Nothing that happened at Northlawn should convince them otherwise…” FYI: Streator Illinois population 13, 000
    6. 6. Pre-Quiz/Test your Knowledge Let’s find our baseline … Select the best possible answer… 6
    7. 7. During a lockdown, you should… Ensure the hallways are empty B. Lock the doors and turn off the lights C. Keep students quiet and away from doors and windows D. Designate a student as a lookout to monitor the situation in the hallway A.
    8. 8. The Correct Answers are…  A, B, and C are all acceptable responses…remember to ignore alarms and bells, verify attendance, and wait for the all clear signal  Student safety and security are first and foremost  Designating a student to serve as a lookout would therefore be inappropriate
    9. 9. When a “Shelter in Place” is required, you should… Crawl under your desk and assume the fetal position B. Turn off the lights and keep students quiet C. Designate a student to inventory and retrieve emergency supplies D. Go on with your day as normal, while staying inside A.
    10. 10. The Correct Answer is…  D – Shelter in Place refers to a potential danger outside  Hence, you would want everyone to seek shelter inside  “Drop and Cover” would apply to an earthquake  Turning off the lights would be necessary if this were a lockdown  We can maintain normal activities while remaining inside the building.
    11. 11. Question: when conducting "Student- Parent Reunifications”, you should… Have clear and concise instructions B. Make sure there are limited access entry and exit points C. Get students off the school site as quickly as possible D. Make sure your emergency contact records are accurate A.
    12. 12. The Correct Answer is…  A, B, AND D  Getting students off the school site is indeed important, but it must be done in an orderly and systematic manner  To ensure proper transfer of custody from school site to parent is done appropriately (and lawfully)
    13. 13. A Setting for an Emergency…  Little River Middle School (fictitious)  Little River MS City population – 5,000+  No active Local Emergency Planning or Joint Operations  Little River Middle School – 400 students  School District lost their SRO last year due to funding issues and police department staff reallocations  Mid-April, weather mild 13
    14. 14. Scenario  Sometime shortly after lunch a visitor who had just parked in the school parking lot and was walking to the school heard a gunshot followed by a loud scream from a child  As he ran to the school, he observed a student bleeding on a bench near the parking lot, apparently injured with a single gunshot wound to the leg  The alarmed visitor ran to the school office and reported a possible assault by a random shooter 14
    15. 15. Additional Information…  The “danger zone” appears to be limited to the school parking lot  No other witnesses appear to be present.  No additional injuries or victims are reported  The student victim was popular among his peers  A student was assaulted two years ago and the school/district was scrutinized/criticized for their “lack of response” and because of the high levels of reported bullying at the school  The student victim had been known to be a bully 15
    16. 16. Problem Summary  A student has been shot and injured on school grounds.  Questions:  How to we ensure the safety of other students / staff and prepare for the community response?  What immediate actions should the school take? Why?  Small group discussions.  Be prepared to share out 16
    17. 17. Adult/Supervisory Response to Immediate Threat…  What is your responsibility?  Act and react  Perform as you were trained  Accept help and relinquish command and control when professional help arrives  The Challenge: how do you preserve and protect the safety and security of students and staff?  When situations are unfolding, escalating, and/or unraveling quicker than you can think of solutions? 18
    18. 18. Emergency Lockdown  Lockdown: Use when there is an immediate threat of violence in, or immediately around, the school  Types of threats:  Shooter  Fight  Domestic dispute or disturbance  Intruder on-campus 19
    19. 19. Lockdown Decision Considerations…  Is there an immediate threat to the safety and security of students and staff?  Can the threat be isolated or de-escalated without compromising the safety and security of staff and students?  Can you justify your decision (not to lockdown) should the situation deteriorate or escalate?  Do you have any reasonable options or alternatives?  Trust your leadership instincts  How will your decision affect or impact students, staff, parents?  How will your decision be perceived or viewed (structure of your system and in the context of your leadership role)?  Get as much information as possible (if possible) to make your decision    From your leadership team From your district—circumstances permitting No time to consider politics  Once you make the decision, commit to it—it’s about safety and security 20
    20. 20. Lockdown Procedure  Students on playground, in halls and restrooms move to       the nearest classroom. Classroom doors and all exterior doors/ windows are immediately locked. Cover windows and door window panels, if able. Sit on floor out of sight of windows, doors. Take attendance. Do not open door or windows. May only be released from Lockdown by police or administrator and designated staff unlocking doors. 21
    21. 21. Things to remember while in lockdown…  Lockdown means LOCKDOWN  Nobody comes in nobody goes out  Until you are given an “all-clear” from an administrator, law enforcement, or EMS staff  Depending on the situation as it evolves…  There may be limited movement throughout the building proper  However, again, nobody in or out  “All Clear” may come via PA system  Depending on conditions… 22
    22. 22. Lockdown Considerations/Complications  Students may not be locked in in regular classroom…how       to coordinate attendance Is anyone assigned to check bathrooms? Teacher off-campus during lunch…buddy system to supervise students? Communications and commands to staff and students Communication to parents and community How are staff accounted for? Sign in/out? Accounting for substitutes, visitors 23
    23. 23. Additional considerations…  When in lockdown…  There is no time for heroic measures—heroics are for law enforcement and EMS  Remained focused on the children in your charge  Remain calm—even if you are not sure what you are supposed to be doing (it’s okay to be afraid—but it is not okay to show it in an emergency)  Calm voices and demeanor have transferable power in a crisis—watch your walkie talkie voice  Conversely, panic is virally infectious  Convey any concerns or discrepancies/ask for clarity thru the chains of communication  Take your attendance in frequent routine intervals  You must know where children in your care are at all times 24
    24. 24. Discussion/Group Work…  Why is Lockdown planning important?  Does your site currently have procedures in place for lockdown?  Have you practiced lockdown at your site?  What are your next steps as it relates to lockdown emergency procedures at your site?  Needs?  Constraints?  Be prepared to share out 25
    25. 25. Lockdown Preparedness…  What are strengths of our plan?  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  What are our concerns?  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________ 26
    26. 26. Lockdown Preparedness  What do we do next?  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________ 27
    27. 27. Questions, answers, and comments… 28
    28. 28. Extraordinary Circumstances: “Hit the Deck”  Anyone recognizing immediate danger shouts “Hit the Deck”  Everyone immediately drops to the ground and lies flat.  No one should get up until an adult gives directions. 29
    29. 29. Hit the Deck (cont’d)  This response is usually used in the event of gunfire. Usually followed by Lock down or evacuation when safe to do so. 30
    30. 30. Procedures and Supplies
    31. 31. Shelter In Place…  This response is used for hazardous materials in the environment.  Shelter in-place would also be used in the following situations  Act of terror  Other related impending military action    Locally Regionally Nationally 32
    32. 32. Shelter In Place: Procedures  Move everyone inside. (interior rooms on upper level floors).  Close and lock all windows and doors.  Custodian to immediately shut down all HVAC units . Call central maintenance?  Seal off all openings with tape and plastic (windows, doors, heat/ air units, electrical outlets, etc).  Await instructions from public officials before exiting shelter. 33
    33. 33. Additional Considerations…  Are there adequate and accurate maps and floor plans of your building?  All doors and windows clearly marked?  Vents?  Are there (manual) shutdown instructions for HVAC?  Communication between staff members?  Walkie talkies? Email? Phone tree?  Frequency of updates 34
    34. 34. “Go-Kit” Handout…  Things to consider… 35
    35. 35. Here’s what many schools are doing in addition…  Individual Child Emergency Kits…  Cover letter to parents…  “…Please place the following items inside the Ziploc bag labeled with your child’s name and bring to your child’s classroom”:  Change of clothes—i.e., t-shirt, pants, socks, and underwear  2 small, sealed bottles of water (8-12 oz.) 2 protein/power bars  1 small package moist towelettes   “…Also recommended:”  A reassuring note from parents  A family picture  A small working flashlight 36
    36. 36. Discussion/Group Work…  What supplies will classrooms need if the     lockdown/shelter-in-place lasts several hours? How will communication with parents and families be handled during the response? What special preparation will be required for your current special needs population? What are your next steps as it relates to shelter in-place? How will communication within the school be conducted?  Backup/redundancy? 37
    37. 37. Discussion/Group Work…  Do you currently have emergency supplies on hand at your site?  School?  Every classroom?  What do your “go-kits” consist of?  What are the strengths and weaknesses of your current emergency supplies on-hand?  What are your next steps in terms of planning?  Share-out/questions, comments… 38
    38. 38. Shelter In-Place Preparedness…  What are strengths of our plan?  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  What are our concerns?  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________ 39
    39. 39. Shelter In-Place Preparedness  What do we do next?  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________ 40
    40. 40. Emergency Supply Readiness…  What are the strengths       of our on-site Emergency Supplies? ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________  What are our concerns       regarding our Emergency Supplies? ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ 41
    41. 41. What do we need to do next?  ____________________________  ____________________________  ____________________________  ____________________________  ____________________________  ____________________________  ____________________________
    42. 42. Media, Staff, and Parents
    43. 43. Communication Considerations  Public information is critical  Establish protocols in advance for communicating timely and consistent information during emergencies  Agreements with community agencies about the release of information and designation a PIO  Template letters that can be used in a crisis  Communication considerations should include parents/guardians, school staff, and the media
    44. 44. Communication Considerations: School Staff  Use plain language to communicate during an emergency  (Sometimes) “less is more”  Verify information before responding  Develop a system for staff and student accountability:  Up-to-date class rosters and student emergency information:   Information on medical conditions Custody issues  Identifying students who are not accounted for  Communication to students  Students and cell-phones
    45. 45. Communication Considerations: School Staff  Develop a communication plan for lockdown situations  Consider emergency plans for after-school activities (i.e., sporting events, dances, graduations, etc.)  Emergency plans for after-school programs led by non-school staff
    46. 46. Communication Considerations: Parents  Provide information on emergency response procedures  Reunification procedures: Clearly articulate parent expectations (i.e., bring photo id, students released to parent/guardian or other pre-authorized emergency contact, etc.)  Translate information as necessary  Emergency notification systems:  Identify media partners  School webpage  Automatic phone/email notification  Incorporate redundancy  Update parent and emergency contact information periodically  Emphasize importance of family preparedness 
    47. 47. Communication Considerations: Media  Assign a single Public Information or “go-to” person” to handle     media inquiries  Qualities, characteristics, and responsibilities Identify media staging areas Establish policies and procedures for dealing with media requests/inquiries Coordinate media releases with community partners:  Ensure that messages are consistent  Ensure that information released is consistent with state and Federal privacy laws (i.e., FERPA) Limit media exposure to students
    48. 48. Student-Parent Reunification  Clear and concise parent expectations are imperative:  Photo ID required  Students only released to parent/guardian or other pre- authorized emergency contact, etc.  Pre-designated ingress for parents and egress for students  ONE or TWO access and exit points  Pre-designated Student Safety and Care Officer(s)   Custodian of student records—to verify parent, guardian, and/or emergency contact Incident Command System 49
    49. 49. Additional Considerations for Reunification…  You will be dealing with emotions…  From parents  From students  Your own  Remember to remain calm  Calm voices and steady demeanor has transferable power  Conversely, signs of aggravation and frustration can infectiously escalate a situation into hostile intensity  Take a breath if you need to—just say, “pardon me a moment”  Never release a child to a person unless you verify their legal right to custody of that child  No matter how much you think you know them, you do not know them unless they are verified pursuant to emergency contact information on record 50
    50. 50. Discussion/Group Work…  Does your site currently have communication protocols in place in the event of an emergency?  Do they include reunification protocols and procedures?  Have you practiced implementing your emergency communication procedures at your site?  What are the strengths and weaknesses of your current communications and reunification plans?  What are your next steps as it relates to emergency communication and reunification procedures?  What measures are needed to put plan in place?  What are the possible or potential constraints?  What are some of the immediate, local, and regional realities that may influence or impact your procedures ? 51
    51. 51. Communication and Reunification Preparedness…  What are strengths of our plan?  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  What are our concerns?  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________  ___________________ 52
    52. 52. Communication and Reunification Preparedness  What do we do next?  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________ 53
    53. 53. Overview of Incident Management Systems and Structures
    54. 54. Incident Command  A commonly accepted plan for disaster incident management that assigns tasks and allows for rapid, expert decision making.  Enhances communication at the incident site within each agency and between agencies.  The Incident Commander is responsible until the authority is delegated to another person. 55
    55. 55. From NIMS to (local) relevance…  National Incident Management System is an important set of measures designed to create capacity and structures to for schools and districts  To help them respond to an emergency situation at a school site and/or throughout an entire school system  Key Influences  Columbine High School incident  September 11th  Regional (state-wide) Influences:  Statewide Firestorms (2003, 2005, and 2007)
    56. 56. Incident Command—when do we use it?  When the event at the site is or has the potential to become an immediate threat  Life and limb of students and staff  When event at the site is part of or affected by a local or regional emergency  Fire  Earthquake  Tsunami 57
    57. 57. Incident Command v Site-Based Decision Making…  Incident Command entails a successive chain of leadership (“chain of command”)  The command structure is purposefully “top-down”  In other words, someone will tell you what to do, and your responsibility is to follow-through with what you are being told to do  Its design and purpose is to guide the system and its inhabitants through a major event or crisis from start to finish  During the event…  Command is activated and decisions are commands  Once the event is over  Command structure is deactivated  Decisions are collaborative 58
    58. 58. Incident Command System: District or (large) site—per: NIMS Incident Command Liaison Officer Safety Officer Public Information Officer Operations Section Chief Planning Section Chief Logistics Section Chief Finance/ Administration Section Chief 59
    59. 59. Reality: Incident Command Structure at a small school site Incident Commander (Principal) Public Information Officer (School Secretary) Safety/Operations (Assistant Principal) Student Safety Logistics Student Care and Recovery 60
    60. 60. Site-Based Incident Command Incident Commander  Is in charge of any crisis until appropriate emergency responder arrives.  Assesses level of danger and determines level of threat.  Establishes inner and outer perimeter and summons additional help.  In the event of a major crisis the Incident Commander establishes a command post  Summons the Incident Command Management Team to the Command Post 61
    61. 61. Site-based Incident Command  Safety and Operations  Most likely and Assistant Principal, Senior or Lead Teacher In some (small site) cases IC, Safety and Operations will be the same person  Monitors safety conditions of students/school staff and develops measures for assuring their safety as the incident evolves  Determines if response actions/strategies by Emergency Operations team can cause harm to staff/students  Determines whether students may need to be evacuated from the school site  62
    62. 62. Operations Teams  Student Safety (Teachers, Nurse)  Search and rescue, triage  Logistics (Maintenance, support staff )  Emergency supplies  Communications  Facility conditions/integrity  Student Care and Recovery (Counselor)  Traumatized students  Reunification with parents  Recovery/aftercare from incident 63
    63. 63. Incident Command Staging Areas— Examples  Command Post—Incident Commander  Principal’s Office  Media/Communication  Library or Counselor’s Office  First Aid/Shelter/Triage  Cafeteria/Covered lunch area  Reunification/Release  Athletic field or play-yard  Open space where entry and exit can be easily limited orr controlled, modified, and/or restricted (if necessary) 64
    64. 64. Recovery…  The primary objective of the recovery  Return to learning and restore the infrastructure as      quickly as possible. Restore the physical plant, as well as the school community. Monitor how staff are assessing students for the emotional impact of the crisis. Identify what follow up interventions are available to students, staff, and first responders. Conduct debriefings with staff and first responders. Reflection  Lessons learned/”Plus Delta”  Implement lessons learned/”next steps” in future action plan 65
    65. 65. Reflection and Dialogue  ICS Reality Check  What do you currently have in place…   As a district? As a school site?  What are the strengths and weaknesses of your current action plan?  What are your next steps 66
    66. 66. Incident Command Readiness…  What are strengths of our plan?  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  What are our concerns?  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________  __________________ 67
    67. 67. Incident Command Readiness..  What do we do next?  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________  _________________________ 68
    68. 68. Little River Middle School--redux
    69. 69. Little River Middle School…  Little River Middle School (fictitious)  Little River MS City population – 5,000+  No active Local Emergency Planning or Joint Operations  Little River Middle School – 400 students  School District lost their SRO last year due to funding issues and police department staff reallocations  Mid-April, weather mild 70
    70. 70. Scenario  Sometime shortly after lunch a visitor who had just parked in the school parking lot and was walking to the school heard a gunshot followed by a loud scream from a child  As he ran to the school, he observed a student bleeding on a bench on near the parking lot, apparently injured with a single gunshot wound to the leg  The alarmed visitor ran to the school office and reported a possible assault by a random shooter 71
    71. 71. Additional Information…  The “danger zone” appears to be limited to the school parking lot  No other witnesses appear to be present.  No additional injuries or victims are reported  The student victim was popular among his peers  A student was assaulted two years ago and the school/district was scrutinized/criticized for their “lack of response” and because of the high levels of reported bullying at the school  The student victim had been known to be a bully 72
    72. 72. Problem Summary  A student has been shot and injured on school grounds.  Questions:  How to we ensure the safety of other students / staff and prepare for the community response?  What immediate actions should the school take? Why?  Small group discussions. 73
    73. 73. The Emergency Unfolds: Actions Taken  The office staff called 911 and the Principal.  The Principal made the decision to place the school in lockdown.  She made the call over the intercom announcing the school was going into lockdown and asked for teachers to check their email for further notification. 74
    74. 74. Questions for Thought and Discussion  Was the decision to go into lockdown a good one? Why?  Should someone go out investigate the scene? Why? Or why Not?  Why email?  What information should the office convey to teachers?  What information should the teachers convey to students? 75
    75. 75. Messages…  911 dispatch informs school that EMS should arrive on scene w/in 30 minutes  Police are en-route but they are not in close proximity—ETA 15 minutes 76
    76. 76. Scenario gets trickier…  20 minutes into lockdown and after receiving update email from office, one of the English teachers messages back saying she is concerned about a male student who is unaccounted for who might likely have had access to weapons from home  The 2nd student had been in classes during the morning periods.  Police have been on scene for 5 minutes. 77
    77. 77. Additional Questions  Does this information impact your current response actions in any way?  What communications need to be occurring within the school, to the district?  Is Incident Command appropriate for this situation?  If so, what Incident Command functions should be initiated?  Who would be performing these functions?  Does lockdown complicate Incident Command roles?  Discussion/reflection 78
    78. 78. Reflection and Dialogue(cont’d)…  What are your possibilities and feasibilities in terms of your planning in general?  Lockdown  Shelter in-place  Parent-Student Reunification  What are your constraints or obstacles…  School site?  District  What do you need to do next? 79
    79. 79. Thank you… For More Information… Excell Education Innovations Bruce L. Mims, Ed.D www.ExcellEducationInnovations.com ExcellEducationInnovations@yahoo.com Ph: (562) 508-2461
    80. 80. Evaluation  Which idea or topic did you find the most useful or helpful?  Which did you find the least helpful?  Overall, I found the presentation and workshop empowering (circle one)      Strongly agree Agree No decision Disagree Strongly disagree  Additional Comments or suggestions…

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