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Essential elements of effective instruction ppt

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Essential elements of effective instruction ppt

  1. 1. Powerful Teaching and Meaningful Learning: Increasing Teaching Effectiveness/Revisiting the Essential Elements of Effective Instruction (EEEI)
  2. 2. Guidelines for “Courageous Conversation”       We are ALL competent educators We ALL bring a wealth of knowledge and experience to the table AND, our knowledge and experience will enrich our discussion We will allow ourselves to experience some level of discomfort; however, we will all remain engaged in the discussion or dialogue Our collegial discourse and participation makes our learning experience more powerful and meaningful None of us knows everything; hence, we all endeavor to participate in this experience in the humble state of students and life-long learners
  3. 3. The Big Picture     This is “STEP ONE” in the journey as it relates to RIGOR and RELEVANCE continuum This is a learning process for all of us Meaning (as always) we are all in this together Hence, we will learn together, grow together, and improve for the betterment of studentlearning outcomes
  4. 4. THE FIVE Es      EXCELLENCE IN CURRICULUM EDUCATING AS A PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY EQUITY IN ACCESS FOR ALL STUDENTS ENVIRONMENTS THAT ARE SAFE FOR LEARNING ENGAGING OUR COMMUNTIY AND STAKEHOLDERS
  5. 5. High Stakes Testing Season  Reality Check   Whether we like it or not…   High stakes assessments are the “make or break” relative to our future  We can either…     We (literally) have only SIX weeks until the 10 th grade CAHSEE census; (approximately) 12 weeks until CSTs; and, (approximately) 15 weeks until AP exams Make things happen Watch things happen Or, wonder, “what happened?” Proactively speaking:   There is a lot we can do on a daily basis to help our students get prepared for high-stakes assessments “Skill-set” pedagogy
  6. 6. Advancing the Locus of Concern  CAHSEE Intervention Program:      Saturday Prep Course for 10th, 11th, and 12 grade students Online interactive learning Intensive tutoring during the week Parents, Community, and Stakeholders  Connect Ed messages on a weekly basis In the Classroom:  Daily CAHSEE and CST skill set practice drills as bell-work warm-ups, or wrap ups:  Goals and objectives CLEARLY articulated  5-7 minutes of independent practice and/or quick-write practice (if applicable)  5 minutes of de-brief and check for understanding/wrap-up  Available Resources:  CAHSEE Sample questions  http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/hs/resources.asp  Other CAHSEE Prep Resources may be “online” in the very near future  CST Sample Questions:  http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/css05rtq.asp
  7. 7. Test Your Knowledge of EEEI 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. What are the components of EEEI (in order)? What are 3 reasons why EEEI is effective? What are the (2) crucial components of an Anticipatory Set? What is the difference between input and modeling? What is the difference between modeling and guided practice? When do you check for understanding in a lesson? What is the difference between checking for understanding and closure? What else is crucial in every lesson besides EEEI? What are (2) reasons why active participation is important? What is the most-important component of EEEI? When are students ready for independent practice, during the course of instruction?
  8. 8. Checking Your Knowledge: The 9 EEEI Components (in order) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Anticipatory set Objective Purpose Input Modeling Guided Practice Checking for understanding (ongoing) Closure Independent Practice
  9. 9. Teaching Pedagogy: Food For Thought…      Marzano (2002) asserts that content knowledge has only a small effect as it relates to student achievement. On the other hand, pedagogical knowledge, i.e., bestteaching practices, are more important and play a more significant role in student-learning outcomes than content knowledge. Meaning: effective teaching practice will go a lot farther to affect (positive) student-learning outcomes than mere content-are knowledge alone That does not mean that content knowledge isn’t important; rather, that good pedagogy is a better bet  Discussion, Q&A, reactions, reflection…
  10. 10. Why is EEEI Effective? The Human Brain     The brain likes to make connections (set, purpose, closure) The brain likes to make meaning (objective) The brain is very visual; in fact, 90% of our learning is visual (modeling) The brain likes to create patterns (guided and independent practice)
  11. 11. Anticipatory Set Must link prior knowledge to the lesson  i.e., known to the unknown  Must be overtly active with checking for understanding 
  12. 12. Input versus Modeling Input is the “telling” part of teaching  i.e., “front-loading”  Modeling is the “showing” part of teaching   IF YOU’RE NOT MODELING=THEN THERE’S NO TEACHING GOING ON
  13. 13. Modeling versus Guided Practice  Modeling:   Guided Practice:   Teacher or peer demonstrates with running commentary (metacognition) Students participate with support from the “expert”. EXPERT DOES IT, STUDENTS TRY IT WITH SUPPORT
  14. 14. Moving to Independent Practice  “8 to 2” rule:   So, what do you do with the other 20%?   When 80% of students have mastered 80% of the content during guided practice Pull them into a smaller group and re-teach THAT’S WHAT DIFFERENTIATION IS ALL ABOUT
  15. 15. Checking for Understanding  The better question is:   When don’t you check for understanding? ANSWER: CHECKING FOR UNDERSTANDING IS A CONTINUOUS PROCESS
  16. 16. Closure versus Checking for Understanding  Closure must be at a taxonomic level that is comprehension or higher  Strive for Analysis:   e.g., quick write, pair share, jigsaw, acrostic learning, snowballing, de-brief, etc. Checking for understanding can be at the knowledge (i.e., rote) level relative to Bloom’s Taxonomy
  17. 17. CRUCIAL PRINCIPLE OF LEARNING   ACTIVE PARTICIPATION Why? It keeps students engaged; you’re able to teach more, better, AND faster  To help you check for understanding  Active participation is a “data” gathering tool that can help you monitor student understanding  This will help you determine when, and how much, to reteach—if necessary 
  18. 18. The Most-Important Component of EEEI THE OBJECTIVE The objective is the foundation upon which everything else in the lesson design is built
  19. 19. Let’s Try it Again 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. What are the components of EEEI (in order)? What are 3 reasons why EEEI is effective? What are the (2) crucial components of an Anticipatory Set? What is the difference between input and modeling? What is the difference between modeling and guided practice? When do you check for understanding in a lesson? What is the difference between checking for understanding and closure? What else is crucial in every lesson besides EEEI? What are (2) reasons why active participation is important? What is the most-important component of EEEI? When are students ready for independent practice, during the course of instruction?
  20. 20. Courageous Conversation: good pedagogy     We ALL know how to do this—with varying degrees of experience Knowing it and doing it are two different things Doing it successfully takes planning, practice, and critical reflection Deferring to the scope and sequence is not commensurate with planning instructional design  Scope and sequence is a tool, or a framework for lesson planning and pacing  However, it is not the “be all, tell all” of instructional delivery  Good pedagogy does not happen by accident or coincidence
  21. 21. “Principal Teacher” Expectations As your Principal Teachers, we expect you to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Implement good teaching pedagogy, using EEEI to guide you Use your collaboration times to dialogue about, and assist your colleagues with instructional planning and/or good lesson design Let us know if you need help, resources, or informal feedback —our job titles (formally—really) are, “Principal Teacher” Use the scope and sequence as your guide to lesson design; however, it cannot (and should not) supplant instructional planning and/or good pedagogy Remember: we are all in this together…

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