Nourishing Communities

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Speaker: Alison Blay-Palmer
Session: Sustainability in Agriculture and Agri-Food: Different Perspectives

Published in: Economy & Finance, Technology
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Nourishing Communities

  1. 1.       Alison  Blay-­‐Palmer   Wilfrid  Laurier  University   Nourishing  Communi<es   Centre  for  Sustainable  Food  Systems  
  2. 2. Why Sustainable? •  Sustainability  is  about  taking  care  of  things  now  so   present  and  future  genera<ons  are  secure   •  Process  of  moving  towards  a  des<na<on  that  includes:     •  Economic  viability     •  Ecological  resilience  and  health   •  Social  jus<ce     2  
  3. 3. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   JUST,  FAIR  
  4. 4. Social   •  Social  jus<ce:   • Everyone  has  access  to  healthy  food  at  affordable   prices  and  farm  families  and  other  businesses  along   the  food  chain  can  earn  a  living  wage  from  their   work         4  
  5. 5. Sustainable  Food  Systems   DEMOCRATIC,  PARTICIPATORY  
  6. 6. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   JUST,  FAIR,  BUILD  NETWORKS,  SOLIDARITY,  CREATE  KNOLWEDGE  FLOWS  
  7. 7. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   SOCIAL  JUSTICE  
  8. 8. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   REGENERATION,  FLOWS  
  9. 9. Ecological •  Ecological  resilience  and  health:   • Produce  high  quality,  safe  food  without   compromising  the  land,  seed  and  biodiversity   resources   • E.g.  Pollinators  and  their  habitat       9  
  10. 10. Photo  by  Erin  Nelson   SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   ECOLOGICALLY  REGENERATIVE  
  11. 11. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   CLOSED  LOOP  
  12. 12. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   CLOSED  LOOP  
  13. 13. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   SHARING  KNOWLEDGE  
  14. 14. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   ECONOMIC  VIABILITY  
  15. 15. Economic •  Economic  viability  for  rural  communi<es  and  farm  families,  with  an   emphasis  on  local  where  feasible   • Provides  communi<es  with  more  resources  making  them  more   vibrant  (Williams  et  al.  2013  –  Func<onal  economy)   • e.g.  mul<plier  effect  =  1.4  for  large  farms  and  2.6  where  small  scale   farms  predominate  (Meter  2008)   • Sustain,  Avalon,  2012         15  
  16. 16. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   DIVERSE,  MULTIFUNCTIONAL  
  17. 17. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   ECONOMICALLY  DIVERSE  AND  RESILIENT  
  18. 18. Why  sustainability?   INTERNATIONAL  CONTEXT   18  
  19. 19. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   USDA  FOOD  HUB  STUDY,  2013,  NUMBER  OF  YEARS  IN  OPERATION   62%  IN  OPERATION  FOR  LESS  THAN  5  YEARS    
  20. 20. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   USDA  FOOD  HUB  STUDY,  2013,  OPERATIONAL  STRUCTURE   47%  NON-­‐PROFIT  OR  CO-­‐OP    
  21. 21. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   USDA  FOOD  HUB  STUDY,  2013,  PERCETN  OF  FARMS  THAT  ARE  SMALL  OR   MID-­‐SIZED   76%  ALL  OR  MOST  
  22. 22. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   USDA  FOOD  HUB  STUDY,  2013,    PRODUCER  PRACTICES   Antibiotic-free, 49 % “prefer”, 43 % “require” Free-range / Pasture-raised, 60 % “prefer”, 35 % “require”  
  23. 23. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   USDA  FOOD  HUB  STUDY,  2013,    CHANGES  IN  PRODUCER  PRACTICES  
  24. 24. Interna<onal  bodies   •  World  Commihee  on  Food  Security:   –  Emphasis  on  small  shareholder   –  Poverty  allevia<on   –  Ac<on  orienta<on   •  East  Asian  Summit:   –  Ahen<on  to  both  food  and  energy  security:   •  “Promote  responsible  agricultural  investment  that  respects   rights,  livelihoods  and  resources”   •  “Sustainable  food  security  is  an  important  element  in  EAS's   long-­‐  term  sustainable  future,  and  has  a  direct  impact  on  the   people  of  the  region,  the  leaders  agreed,  while  no<ng  that  it   also  overlaps  with  many  key  areas  of  the  EAS,  such  as  the   environment,  energy,  global  health  and  connec<vity.”  
  25. 25. EU  Consulta<on  on  Food  System   Sustainability   •  Exploring  type  and  scale  of   ac<on  for:   •  Technical  knowledge  on   environmental  impact  of   food   •  S<mulate  sustainable  food   produc<on  and  consump<on   •  Reducing  food  waste  and   loss   •  Improving  policy  coherence   25  
  26. 26. Australia – National Food Plan $1.5  million  AU   Build  and  diversify  agriculture   26  
  27. 27. Na<onal  Food  Plan  (2012:3)   •  “Our  food  system  isn’t  just  about  high  yield   agriculture  and  exports,  it  is  also  about  local   communi<es  growing,  preparing  and  sharing  food.   We  are  commihed  to  suppor<ng  the  growing   numbers  of  farmers’  markets,  food  sharing  networks   and  community  gardens  around  the  country.  We  will   also  work  to  embed  food  and  agriculture  within  the   na<onal  curriculum  so  that  our  kids  know  where   food  comes  from  and  value  the  hard  working   Australians  who  produce  it.”  (Minister  of  Agriculture)   27  
  28. 28. UNCTAD  Trade  and  Environment   Review  (2013)     •  “…the  need  for  a  two-­‐track   approach  that  dras<cally   reduces  the  environmental   impact  of  conven<onal   agriculture,  on  the  one  hand,   and  broadens  the  scope  for   agro-­‐ecological  produc<on   methods  on  the  other.”   hhp://unctad.org/en/ Publica<onsLibrary/ ditcted2012d3_en.pdf   28  
  29. 29. SUSTAINABLE  FOOD  SYSTEMS   PLACE-­‐BASED  –  KEEP  VALUE  IN  LOCAL  ECONOMY  –  FAIR,  JUST,  INCLUSIVE   –  BUILD  REGIONAL  SOCIAL,  KNOWLEDGE  AND  PHYSICAL  CAPACITY  –   ECOLOGICALLY  REGENERATIVE  
  30. 30. Thank  you     alison.blaypalmer@gmail.com     30  

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