BOF AMERICAS 2013: WMS

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  • Multi-iterative improvement. First there were screws and bolts all over the floor. Then 7 permanent cups were added to keep the items off the floor, but the nuts and bolts got mixed together. Now removable cups only hold the types of nuts and bolts needed for the job at hand.
  • Multi-iterative improvement. First there were screws and bolts all over the floor. Then 7 permanent cups were added to keep the items off the floor, but the nuts and bolts got mixed together. Now removable cups only hold the types of nuts and bolts needed for the job at hand.
  • Multi-iterative improvement. First there were screws and bolts all over the floor. Then 7 permanent cups were added to keep the items off the floor, but the nuts and bolts got mixed together. Now removable cups only hold the types of nuts and bolts needed for the job at hand.
  • These static electric EEPROM boxes were being thrown out in the garbage after being emptied. Now we are reusing them. They are $6 each and in just about a week of reusing these boxes we’ve saved about $600 in cost and this rate will be constant or increase in the future.
  • The corners of our flexible, interlocking conveyor tracks have sharp edges that caught people’s cloths. A quick wrap with packing tape makes the corners safe and is now a common best practice on all conveyor tracks.
  • This dangling *THING* had hit people in the head. A 5-cent hook now gives this *THING* a home reducing the likelihood of an injury.
  • Items used to be stacked on top of each other on the ground and then transported. Now using what was an abandoned jack, the heavy items are now quickly slid horizontally on the jack as its lowered one step at a time. This has reduced hundreds of physical lifting actions every week.
  • Ball bearing sections allow our extremely heavy products to rotate 90 degrees at turns and corners. When one station worker was tired of always getting his parts facing backwards requiring him to lift and rotate the item, he used a ball bearing section on a straight conveyor path to swivel it around. This was unheard of until now.
  • Thirsty at your station, but can’t have liquid containers by the electrified items your building? Create a make-shift bottle holder, below your home make mouse pad.
  • This lamp serves as a traveling trophy. The manager of the assembly line with the most submitted ideas in a week gets to have the lamp at their desk. If the lamp has to move to another assembly line, it’s the losing manager who has to deliver it to the new manager. Managers do NOT want to give up this lamp. This has fostered a very constructive and light-hearted sense of competition.
  • This lamp serves as a traveling trophy. The manager of the assembly line with the most submitted ideas in a week gets to have the lamp at their desk. If the lamp has to move to another assembly line, it’s the losing manager who has to deliver it to the new manager. Managers do NOT want to give up this lamp. This has fostered a very constructive and light-hearted sense of competition.
  • A great way to show your appreciation is with food. Once a quarter, the assembly line with the most completed trials gets a buffet lunch and extended noon break. The cost to the company is minimal and since we have a captive audience, we explain our metrics, talk about the ideas we like and allow the awareness of the ideas to spread so others can copy, adopt, and improve upon them.
  • So where do we go from here? The ideas coming in are getting much better at identifying the context of the problem they are solving and not just complaining about things or wishing for things. I would love to see submissions become more quantifiable. Even if it’s inches of shoelaces per fortnight, we want submitters to be able to articulate their idea’s potential in the form of a quantifiable increase or decrease of something desirable. Also, we really want more middle managers to be submitting more ideas, not just evaluating those from station employees.
  • So now let’s wrap it up so we can get to some Q&A. I have a couple of points that I would love to drive home even if it might sound a bit redundant. We’re getting near the end so start thinking of some good ideas.
  • There is no such thing as over communicating stories of success even the smallest of successes. It has taken me a long time to figure this one out, and it still draws me out of my comfort zone, but submitters and evaluators at every level need to see that things go in AND things come out of the process.
  • When you are launching or invigorating your program I recommendyou aim directly at the heart of the organization and focus on middle-management. Leadership will eagerly sponsor innovation when they see initiative from below. Front line employees have no shortage of ideas to make things better. It’s middle management will initially be your greatest obstacle but will be your biggest asset if you can get them on your side.
  • Homework: RUN, don’t walk to Amazon and buy Jeffery Phillips newest book. I swear he was spying on WMS when we wrote it. He absolutely NAILED our company culture along with all of our best intentions and missteps. This book provides an insightful diagnosis of what ails most modern companies when it comes to executing innovation.
  • Ritual is powerful. Work with management to craft an innovation manifesto and read it often.Leadership says they want innovation but the unspoken truth is that often times the emperor might not have any clothes on. It’s not their fault that they don’t know what innovation requires because we haven’t taught that in MBA programs for the past 100 years. We need to be educators, mentors, leaders, and transformative change agents of cultural norms.It’s a tough job, and can be extremely lonely often times but you all especially know it can be one of the most rewarding aspects of our work as innovation managers.
  • BOF AMERICAS 2013: WMS

    1. 1. 1 of 40 Small Ideas, Big Results A Peak Behind the Curtain at the WMS Shop Floor Continuous Improvement Program
    2. 2. 2 of 40 Paul only gave me 20 minutes so….. Learn more
    3. 3. 3 of 40 WMS’ BrightIdea Use Cases Invention Disclosure Directed Campaigns Continuous Improvement Road mapping Product Features Voice of the Customer Open Innovation Contests DownstreamUpstream Vendor/Supplier Co-Creation EXTERNAL INTERNAL
    4. 4. 4 of 40 Defining the Program
    5. 5. 5 of 40
    6. 6. 6 of 40 Station Employees Supervisors Value Stream Managers Submit Evaluate Submit Evaluate VP Manufacturing Submit Evaluate Define the Roles and Responsibilities
    7. 7. 7 of 40 Local - Items that affect you or your group, that your manager can approve, that you as a team can achieve with minimal intervention from other groups. Measureable – Demonstrates a quantifiable improvement backed up by a metric (i.e. pounds lifted per erroneous order). Important - You submit it, you’re expected to work on it. Don’t submit ideas you are not willing to help create. Define the Ideal Submission
    8. 8. 8 of 40 Define the Process Flow Not Yet Reviewed Approved to Try Completed Recognized Not Approved to Try Escalated New Idea Awaiting Decision Target: 1 Day or Less Target: 3 Days or Less End Change Ideas, Submitter and Manager
    9. 9. 9 of 40 Governance: 1. Acknowledge every idea within 24 hours 2. Decide on every idea within 72 hours 3. Approve by default, deny if you must, escalate as a last resort Picture of the Rules Engine Define the Expected Behavior
    10. 10. 10 of 40 • Each manager is a “Category”. • Create an alert for each. Manager to their named “category”. Changed “Category” level to “Manager” on submission form. Keeping Managers Engaged
    11. 11. 11 of 40 Small Ideas, Big Results
    12. 12. 12 of 40 Before After Identify and Eliminate Waste
    13. 13. 13 of 40 Identify and Eliminate Waste
    14. 14. 14 of 40 Cost Savings
    15. 15. 15 of 40 Safety
    16. 16. 16 of 40 Safety
    17. 17. 17 of 40 Safety
    18. 18. 18 of 40 Unintended Uses of Existing Resources
    19. 19. 19 of 40 Before After Unintended Uses of Existing Resources
    20. 20. 20 of 40 Unintended Uses of Existing Resources
    21. 21. 21 of 40
    22. 22. 22 of 40 Rewards and Recognition
    23. 23. 23 of 40 Rewards and Recognition
    24. 24. 24 of 40 Rewards and Recognition
    25. 25. 25 of 40 Rewards and Recognition
    26. 26. 26 of 40 Rewards and Recognition
    27. 27. 27 of 40 Metrics and Measurements
    28. 28. 28 of 40 Metrics and Measurements
    29. 29. 29 of 40 Metrics and Measurements
    30. 30. 30 of 40 Metrics and Measurements (Waiting for approval) + (In Trial) + (Waiting for Recognition) (Waiting for approval) + (In Trial) + (Waiting for Recognition) + (No Trial) + (Recognized) In Flight % =
    31. 31. 32 of 40 Metrics and Measurements
    32. 32. 33 of 40 What’s Next?
    33. 33. 34 of 40 Final Thoughts and Recommendations
    34. 34. 35 of 40 Final Thoughts and Recommendations
    35. 35. 36 of 45 “The true strength of an army lies in the non-commissioned officers.” -Charlie Guild Final Thoughts and Recommendations
    36. 36. 37 of 40 Final Thoughts and Recommendations
    37. 37. 38 of 40 Final Thoughts and Recommendations Ritual is powerful. Work with management to craft an innovation manifesto and read it often.
    38. 38. 39 of 40 Small Ideas, Big Results

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