Instructional Partnerships that Deliver Success

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This was a presentation presented in collaboration with Dr. Judi Moreillon of Texas Women's University and teams of teacher librarians from around the country representing Elementary, Middle and High School programs.

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Instructional Partnerships that Deliver Success

  1. 1. http://animoto.com/play/XGIyUfLHY32MGpDQdj6vKA
  2. 2. Common Scores Instructional Partnerships that Deliver SUCCESS! ALA Annual Convention Chicago, Illinois June 2013
  3. 3. Presenters Judi Paradis, Elementary Librarian and Marianne Duffy, 1st-grade Teacher Plympton Elementary School, Waltham, Massachusetts
  4. 4. Presenters Sabrina Carnesi, Middle School Librarian Crittenden Middle School Newport News, Virginia and Naadira Mubarak, Teacher Syms Middle School, Hampton, Virginia
  5. 5. Presenter Stacy Cameron Pioneer Heritage Middle School Frisco Independent School District (ISD), Frisco, Texas Representing Prosper High School Prosper, Texas
  6. 6. Presenter Judi Moreillon, Assistant Professor Texas Woman’s University, Denton, Texas
  7. 7. http://commonscores.wikispaces.com
  8. 8. Introductions 1. Instructional-level Groups 2. Meet your neighbors. 3. Who are you?
  9. 9. Disclaimer
  10. 10. All of photographs used in this presentation were provided by classroom teachers and school librarians who cotaught lessons from Coteaching Reading Comprehension Strategies in Elementary School Libraries: Maximizing Your Impact (Moreillon 2013). All images are used with permission.
  11. 11. Objectives: At the end of this workshop, you will be able to:   Identify the benefits of classroom-library collaboration for instruction for all stakeholders. Cite research that confirms positive correlations between the collaborative work of school librarians and student achievement, particularly in reading and language arts.
  12. 12. Objectives: At the end of this workshop, you will be able to:    Identify connections between the common core of the library program and CCSS or other state-level standards. Specify skills, dispositions, and responsibilities of instructional partners. Apply a rating scale to self-assess development as L4L school librarians and identify specific areas for improvement based on AASL‘s five roles for school librarians.
  13. 13. Objectives: At the end of this workshop, you will be able to:    Deconstruct/assess (with a checklist) a lesson or unit plan published as a Knowledge Quest 40.4 ―Coteaching‖ article. Hear first-hand experiences of successful instructional partnerships. Gain strategies for coteaching and advocating with site- or district-level administrators for instructional partner role.
  14. 14. Classroom-Library Collaboration for Instruction What are the benefits to • Students • Educators • Administrators?
  15. 15. Pollev.com or Text to 37607 Who is your primary service population? Students Teachers 350529 or 350530 http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/5iThm4hN9ergxwI
  16. 16. Poll Everywhere: 22333 Who is your primary service population? Students 350529 or Teachers 350530? ―When school librarians are asked, ‗who do they serve?‘ most would answer ―students,‖ yet the primary clientele is terms of power, impact, and effect would be teachers‖ (Haycock 2010, 3).
  17. 17. Think… about preparing for an individual, potluck, or planned and shared party meal. All images copyright-free from MorgueFile.com
  18. 18. What different considerations do you have if you are: – eating a meal at home alone? – bringing a dish to an unplanned potluck? – bringing veggies because someone decided all the people whose last names begins with A-D will bring veggies?
  19. 19. Classroom-Library Collaboration is like planning, cooking, eating together at a special party – and cleaning up together! It involves… collaborating with others to determine a theme (goals and objectives), date, time, and location (scheduling), sequence of events (lesson or unit plan), means to document the party (learning artifacts or exam), and feedback from party-goers (assessment) for the food, decorations, music, activities, and more?
  20. 20. Cooperation These are some key ideas and phrases that describe cooperation:  Dividing up the work  Being flexible  Getting along  Communicating Cooperation is an  Listening to others important part of effective school librarianship.
  21. 21. Collaboration These are some key ideas and phrases that describe collaboration:  Standards-based curricular focus  Joint planning and designing of learning experiences  Common goals and shared objectives Collaboration is an essential aspect of effective school librarianship.
  22. 22. Coteaching These are some key ideas and phrases that describe coteaching:  Shared and negotiated responsibilities during planning and lesson implementation  Co-modeling and co-monitoring  Co-evaluating (students‘ learning processes and products, the collaborative process and the lessons or units themselves) Coteaching is an critical to the future of school librarianship.
  23. 23. Coteaching Strategies  Center Teaching
  24. 24. Coteaching Strategies  Parallel Teaching
  25. 25. Coteaching Strategies  Alternative Teaching
  26. 26. Coteaching Strategies  Team Teaching
  27. 27. Coteaching Strategies  Team Teaching
  28. 28. Coteaching Strategies  Team Teaching
  29. 29. Coteaching Strategies  Team Teaching
  30. 30. Research-based Evidence • • Research in sixteen states and one Canadian province shows that wellfunded, professionally-staffed school library programs based on classroom-library collaboration correlate positively with student achievement, particularly in reading (Library Research Service 2013). Summary from Kachel, et. al. 2011 http://libweb.mansfield.edu//upload/kachel/ClassChart.pdf
  31. 31. Evidence FOR Practice   Creating 21st-Century Learners: A Report on Pennsylvania’s Public School Libraries • • ―The librarian collaborates closely with classroom teachers in every subject area to teach students everything from making sense of the information they gather to collaborating with other students to create new knowledge‖ (PA School Library Project 2012).
  32. 32. Evidence FOR Practice   • • • Creating 21st-Century Learners: A Report on Pennsylvania’s Public School Libraries The overall findings fit with research we‘ve seen in other states— access to a full-time, certified school librarian significantly impacts students achievement in reading (PA School Library Project 2012).
  33. 33. More Evidence … School librarians have the greatest impact on student achievement when they practice coplanning, coteaching, teaching ICT (information and communication technology), and providing inservice workshops.  These are among the library predictors of students‘ academic achievement on standardized tests, particularly in reading and language arts (Achterman 2008, 62-65). 
  34. 34. Still More Evidence… In a collaborative school culture, teachers report that the school library conducts substantial,  cost-effective,  hands-on professional development  through the cooperative design of learning experiences;  school librarians have instructional expertise; and… 
  35. 35. Still More Evidence…  the school library offers a learning environment that is based on a “complex model of teaching and learning of teaching and learning that is exploratory and highly motivational” (Todd, Gordon, and Lu 2012, xxii-xxiii).
  36. 36. Still More Evidence Administrators correlate a successful educational program with     an active, collaborative, and resourceful library program (Lance et. al. 2010, 15-16). Principals who support collaborative efforts amongst classroom teachers and school librarians acknowledge the results of these efforts are demonstrated in academic achievement and increased scores on standardized tests.
  37. 37. Still more evidence  In a collaborative school culture, principals:  ―endorse a whole school, 21 century learning environment where educators model collaboration for students as they collaborate; encourage a culture of innovation, risk taking, and high expectations and acknowledge the actions school librarians take to shape a school culture of deep learning‖ (Todd, Gordon, and Lu 2012, xxii).  
  38. 38. Evidence IN Practice  School librarians‘ effectiveness as educators may  hinge on being considered a peer by classroom teacher colleagues and equals with classroom teachers by administrators.  As Zmuda and Harada attest, ―Effective partnerships help teachers to meet their existing priorities, which include the implementation of a standards-based curriculum‖ (2008, 38).
  39. 39. Standards, Processes, and Applications Sit in groups of three or four. Shuffle and deal the puzzle parts. Take turns reading each puzzle part. Determine a keyword or keywords. Discuss as a group in which column this piece fits. – Place the piece on the board under CCSS, AASL Standards, Inquiry, Reading, or Applications. – – – – – 41
  40. 40. A Word about Inquiry and Reading Inquiry Motivation/Negotiation Plan/Formulation Investigation Construction Presentation Evaluation/Reflection 42 Reading Strategies Activating or Building Background Knowledge Questioning Determining Main Ideas Making Predictions and Drawing Inferences Synthesizing Defining/Refining the Purpose for Reading
  41. 41. Standards, Processes, and Applications Sit in groups of three or four. Shuffle and deal the puzzle parts. Take turns reading each puzzle part. Determine a keyword or keywords. Discuss as a group in which column this piece fits. – Place the piece on the board under CCSS, AASL Standards, Inquiry, Reading, or Applications. – – – – – 43
  42. 42. Define, Discuss, and Self-Assess:  Skills  Dispositions  Responsibilities of effective instructional partners.
  43. 43. Researched-based Instructional Strategies Category Percentile Gain Identifying similarities and differences 45 Summarizing and note taking 34 Nonlinguistic representations 27 Cooperative learning 27 Setting objectives and providing feedback Questions, cues, and advance organizers 23 22 Marzano, Pickering, and Pollack 2001
  44. 44. Available from AASL
  45. 45. Successful Teams: Share their stories. Copyright-free image from Morguefile.com
  46. 46. Job-embedded Professional Development  Professional Learning Communities ―The single most effective way in which principals can function as staff development leaders is providing a school context that fosters job-embedded professional development‖ (DuFour 2001, 14–15).
  47. 47. Two Heads Are Better than One I am a teacher. I am a teacher, too. I teach in the classroom. I teach in the library. And we teach even better side by side we two.
  48. 48. Sometimes I approach you with a new resource or tool. Sometimes I approach you with a learning problem to solve. We take turns leading and following and always working together as equal partners.
  49. 49. We plan for instruction with student outcomes in mind. We brainstorm. We negotiate. We bounce ideas off each other.
  50. 50. I bring my knowledge of individual students. I bring my knowledge of resources. And we both bring our knowledge of curriculum standards and instructional strategies and our love of learning!
  51. 51. We determine the essential questions. We select the best resources. We build scaffolds and bridges to help learners succeed.
  52. 52. We model the tasks. We model the process. We assess our examples with checklists and rubrics that we designed together. Then we turn the students loose…
  53. 53. to develop questions, to make choices, to locate, analyze, and evaluate information and ideas, to develop strategies, to organize their thinking, to create new understandings.
  54. 54. With the guidance of two educators, with four helpful hands, we monitor, we adjust. We give twice the feedback. We are a team.
  55. 55. Two reflective practitioners, two avid learners, two joyful explorers who know… that two heads, yes, two heads, are better than one!
  56. 56. A ripple? Or a wave? It’s up to US!
  57. 57. References Achterman, Doug. 2008. Haves, Halves, and Have-nots: School Libraries and Student Achievement in California. Diss. University of North Texas. Denton, Texas: UNT Digital Library. http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc9800/m1/1/. Click. ―Kk_metro_library.11.‖ JPG. Morguefile. http://www.morguefile.com/archive/display/186843. Coteaching Photographs. All Used with Permission. ©2013 Judi Moreillon DuFour, Rick. 2001. ―In the Right Context: The Effective Leader Concentrates on a Foundation of Programs, Procedures, Beliefs, Expectations, and Habits.‖ Journal of Staff Development 22 (1): 14-17. Haycock, Ken. 2010. ―Leadership from the Middle: Building Influence for Change.‖ In The Many Faces of School Library Leadership, ed. S. Coatney, 1-12. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. Kachel, Debra E. et al. 2011. School Library Research Summarized: A Graduate Class Project. Mansfield, PA: School of Library & Information Technologies Department, Mansfield University. http://libweb.mansfield.edu/upload/kachel/ImpactStudy.pdf.
  58. 58. References Lance, Keith Curry, Marcia J. Rodney, and Bill Schwarz. 2010. ―The Impact of School Libraries on Academic Achievement: A Research Study Based on Responses from Administrators in Idaho.‖ School Library Monthly 26(9): 14-17. Library Research Service. 2013. School Library Impact Studies. http://lrs.org. Marzano, Robert. J., Debra J. Pickering, and Jane E. Pollock. 2001. Classroom Instruction that Works: Research-based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development. Moreillon, Judi. 2013. Coteaching Reading Comprehension Strategies in Elementary School Libraries: Maximizing Your Impact. Chicago: ALA Editions. Moreillon, Judi and Susan Ballard. (eds). 2013. Best of KQ: Instructional Partnerships: A Pathway to Leadership. Chicago: American Association of School Librarians. Todd, Ross J., Carol A. Gordon, and Ya-Ling Lu. 2012. ―Clone the School Librarian‖: Evidence of the Role of the School Librarian in Professional Development.‖ Growing Schools: Librarians as Professional Developers. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. xxii-xxiii. Word Clouds. 2013. Wordle.net. http://wordle.net.
  59. 59. Wiki Support for this Presentation http://commonscores.wikispaces.com

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