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Reaching Decision Makers - Brian Groth - Feb 2015

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Tips to:
1. Discover the decisions to be made, who approves & who signs
2. Earn the right to talk to the CxO
3. Sound like the CxO
4. Choose the right “champion”

Published in: Sales

Reaching Decision Makers - Brian Groth - Feb 2015

  1. 1. Reaching Decision Makers Brian Groth Sales Enablement Manager, Xactly http://www.linkedin.com/in/bgroth @BrianGroth
  2. 2. Agenda 1. Discover the decisions to be made, who approves & who signs 2. Get the support of more than just one “champion” 3. Be prepared for that CxO-level conversation 4. Work with Mobilizers, not Talkers
  3. 3. First a few assumptions: You’re at least getting a foot in the door 1. You are using their corporate web site to find people 2. You are responding to e-mail and web form requests 3. You are using LinkedIn and other tools to find people 4. You are attending events (in-person, online) to find people 5. You finally get at least one person to talk to, so when you meet in person or talk on the phone…
  4. 4. Discover the decisions to be made, who approves & who signs
  5. 5. Discover the decisions to be made “The secret to finding the decision makers is to define what decisions need to be made to complete a transactions.” – Brian Burns, Host at The Brutal Truth About Sales & Selling – PodCast 1. Who will your product impact? Who will determine if Sales, Finance and IT support the solution? (few solutions impact only one function) 2. Are there any specific steps in the process, meetings or reviews that need to happen before a decision can be made? Who needs to be at those meetings? 3. Are there compliance reviews that need to happen? 4. Are there security reviews that need to happen?
  6. 6. Discover who approves the project 1. What are you (champ) personally accountable for? 2. Who needs to be involved in evaluating and approving the solution? 3. Who needs to be involved in making the final purchase decision? 4. Does legal have to review and approve anything?
  7. 7. Discover who signs the paperwork 1. Who needs to sign off on the purchase order, the agreement, the SOW? (signatory versus approval) 2. Who owns the budget or can create the budget? 3. Does the amount of the deal make an impact signer? 4. Can anyone block the order? Procurement? 5. Is anyone who needs to sign going to be out (vacation, etc.) when we expect to get the paperwork signed? 6. Process: Who will write the purchase requisition and justification for the purchase?
  8. 8. Earn the right to talk to the CxO
  9. 9. Get the team’s support first 1. “When it does come time to decide, the decision maker wants to know he’s got the strong backing of his team.” 2. “You can’t just elevate the conversation and cut everyone else out because it’s exactly that team input that the decision maker values most when it comes to loyalty.” Source: “The Challenger Sale”
  10. 10. Ask to get introduced 1. To others involved in the project – be the one who treats them like a team working on the project (the project is to buy, implement and live with a solution) 2. Once you have names of decision makers and influencers, ask to be introduced to them and/or to have your champ set up a meeting for you with them “69% of B2B buyers are more likely to choose a vendor who is recommended to them” “46% more likely to choose a vendor who builds relationships with the buyer’s other stakeholders.” Source: LinkedIn Global Study of 1,500 B2B Decision-Makers and Influencers, May 2014
  11. 11. Sound like the CxO
  12. 12. You will be taken to the person you sound like 1. Learn the lingo of a Sales VP, CFO, CMO, CIO, tec. 2. Participate in group discussions on LinkedIn 3. Share relevant content on LinkedIn 4. Go to their website and look at their recent press announcements. Understand their business challenges. 5. Google their company name with an added word like “problem”, “issues”, or “challenges”. See what pops up. 6. Look at their operating statement. Are they any numbers that are worse than they were the year before?
  13. 13. Understand the CxO before selling 1. Motivation: Understand what they will care about, not the people below them 2. Interests: Social Selling if possible, but always know account and industry related news 3. Business & Financial Acumen: Have business- level conversation, not a product pitch 4. Build Rapport: Quickly mirror tone of voice, volume, tempo and words
  14. 14. Choose the right “champion”
  15. 15. Find the Mobilizers, Avoid the Talkers “Mobilizers” drive organizational action and bring healthy debate to sales discussions The “Talkers” can help you find information, but won’t drive action? Source: Corporate Executive Board
  16. 16. Recognize the “Mobilizer” Is your contact: 1. Challenging you on the insights you’ve share? Ask you thought-provoking questions” 2. Interested in using your solution to drive behaviors that align to company goals? Refer to the org. more than themselves? 3. Willing to work on the next steps of their buying process with you? Willing to do some of the tasks? If your contact does not show these traits, then ask for others in the account that you can talk to, with a goal of finding a mobilzer. Source: Corporate Executive Board
  17. 17. Summary  Discover the decisions to be made, who approves & who signs  Discover the decisions to be made  Discover who approves the project  Discover who signs the paperwork  Earn the right to talk to the CxO  Get the team’s support  Ask to get introduced  Sound like the CxO  You will be taken to the person you sound like  Understand the CxO before selling  Choose the right “champion”  Find the Mobilizers, avoid the Talkers  Recognize the “Mobilizer”
  18. 18. Brian Groth Sales Enablement Manager, Xactly http://www.linkedin.com/in/bgroth @BrianGroth

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