Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

500-Level Guide to Career Internals

841 views

Published on

This is not yet another career session that tells you to be friendly and network. Forget that - this is about using your IT skills to reinvent the way you get paid. Brent will explain how he went from DBA to MVP to MCM to business founder.

Brent will show you simple techniques to build a blog, a brand, and a business without that pesky personal networking stuff. He will explain why you have to give everything away for free, and why you cannot rely on the old methods to make money anymore.

It will not be easy - and that is why this session is level 500. This session is about radical methods that achieve radical results.

Published in: Career
  • Login to see the comments

500-Level Guide to Career Internals

  1. 1. 500-Level Guide to Career Internals Brent Ozar, Brent Ozar Unlimited
  2. 2. Brent Ozar Consultant, Brent Ozar Unlimited I make SQL Server faster and more reliable. I created sp_Blitz® and the SQL Server First Responder Kit, and I loves sharing knowledge at BrentOzar.com. I hold a bunch of certifications and awards including the rare Microsoft Certified Master. You don’t care about any of that though. /brentozar @brento brentozar
  3. 3. Abstract This is not yet another career session that tells you to be friendly and network. Forget that - this is about using your IT skills to reinvent the way you get paid. Brent will explain how he went from DBA to MVP to MCM to business founder. Brent will show you simple techniques to build a blog, a brand, and a business without that pesky personal networking stuff. He will explain why you have to give everything away for free, and why you cannot rely on the old methods to make money anymore. It will not be easy - and that is why this session is level 500. This session is about radical methods that achieve radical results.
  4. 4. I am not selling anything. (”So, uh, why are you doing this?”) 4
  5. 5. This is for you. No questions are off limits. Questions: BrentOzar.com/go/ask 5
  6. 6. This presentation is for 2004 Brent.
  7. 7. 2000: started a blog, wrote about anything and everything 2005: slowly focused more on SQL Server 2006: started writing white papers, recording webcasts 2008: stumbled into a job as an evangelist 2009: learned a ton from a marketing department 2010: got enough side work that I started consulting 2011: started consulting & training company with friends I did this the long, hard way. 7
  8. 8. Blog posts started showing up in Google My face showed up in weekly webcasts Early adopter of Twitter Presented anywhere that would have me Zero to getting unsolicited job offers: ten years. Over time, more people knew me. 8
  9. 9. Phase 1: Do this for jobs you’re applying for. Before people interview you, they’re going to Google you. You’re in control of what they find. Phase 2: Do this to get jobs you didn’t know existed. Build up an online presence and people will start sending you short-term and long-term work out of nowhere. There’s 2 reasons to do this. 9
  10. 10. Why We Gotta Do It: • What success means to me • Why salespeople get it, and I don’t Building the Project Plan: • Learning what you get paid for • Defining what you’re good at now • Designing your 1-year sharing plan Phase 1: Starting a Presence Phase 2: Spreading the Word Marketing: • Knowing what makes you, you • Inbound vs outbound marketing • Why you have to give it all away Agenda 10
  11. 11. Career success And why I couldn’t figure out how to get it 11
  12. 12. What career success means to me Doing challenging work I love Being surrounded by people I admire Working for a company that I respect A fair trade between hours I put in, and the reward The ability to make that tradeoff choice myself (Success doesn't have to be working for yourself, or being a consultant, or working four hours per week. It CAN be those, but it doesn't have to be.)
  13. 13. What career failure means to me Doing boring work I hate Being surrounded by people I don’t look up to Working for a company that I’m ashamed of An unfair relationship between my hours and my pay Inability to take time off when I want to (This isn’t just full time jobs: I know consultants & business owners who feel like they’re failing, too.)
  14. 14. Success: not having to job hunt at all. People bringing fun opportunities that are a perfect next step for me. Failure: submitting resumes into a huge pile of strangers, fighting for a crappy job I don’t even really want. What job hunting success means to me
  15. 15. We fail because we suck at networking.
  16. 16. Q: In order to meet new people, I: 1. Read stuff online, getting to know the authors 2. Talk with others in forums, Twitter, Facebook 3. Go to in-person events and hoping others introduce themselves to me 4. Go to in-person events and breaking the ice by introducing myself to other folks
  17. 17. Q: My personal network is: 1. Ethernet or WiFi 2. A few folks that I've worked with in the past 3. Dozens of people I've met online (but not IRL) in the database community 4. Hundreds of people that I stay in touch with and meet up with regularly to keep growing
  18. 18. Q: To get ready for my next job, I: 1. Uh, wait, is this about the office supplies I stole? 2. Tune into webcasts every few months that cover topics I'm already working with 3. Every month, I learn about new things outside of my comfort zone 4. As I learn and grow each month, keep my resume and LinkedIn up to date with what I'm doing
  19. 19. Q: For my career growth, I set aside: 1. None 2. 1-4 hours per week 3. 1 day per week 4. 2 days per week
  20. 20. Q: I give back to the community by: 1. I don't. 2. Being a good attendee by filling out feedback forms and leaving constructive blog post comments 3. By doing things online like blogging 4. By doing things in person like volunteering, presenting, and organizing a user group
  21. 21. Now add up your points.
  22. 22. 5-7 points: First, think about who's responsible for your career.
  23. 23. 14-20 points: You don't need this session.
  24. 24. The rest of you need this session. I certainly did.
  25. 25. 2004 Brent’s job hunt
  26. 26. I make SQL Server go faster.
  27. 27. I measure stuff for a living.
  28. 28. but I didn’t measure my career.
  29. 29. big irrelevant data
  30. 30. salesperson’s metric #1: rainfall
  31. 31. Salespeople are coin-operated. They take a percentage of incoming revenue. To do that, they have to understand: • What customers need • What they’re willing to pay for it • How to get the customers to let go of the money • How to get their company to actually do the work
  32. 32. Salesperson’s metric #2: how many people know me?
  33. 33. How salespeople work that metric Go to in-person networking events Cold call strangers Send out fliers Go to places where their customers might be Gradually build up their Rolodex over time
  34. 34. Old-school networking sucks It requires being in a certain place at a certain time, and you don't have that free time (salespeople do) It's not Web Scale: unless you get an auditorium, it's only a few people at a time, and it can't go viral We don't have people skills
  35. 35. Mission #1: figure out what I get paid for Mission #2: figure out how to get known for doing that Thinking like a less-slimy salesperson 35
  36. 36. Why some roles make more money Let’s play a game. 36
  37. 37. 1. Free: Google it, read blog posts, Stack answers 2. Pay $50, and spend days reading a book 3. Pay $200, and spend hours watching a video 4. Pay $3,000, and go to a class or conference at some point in the future 5. Pay $10,000 and hire someone who’s done it Options to relieve a pain
  38. 38. Pain: you’re building a new SQL Server, and you want to know best practices for configuring TempDB.
  39. 39. 1. Free: Google it, read blog posts, Stack answers 2. Pay $50, and spend days reading a book 3. Pay $200, and spend hours watching a video 4. Pay $3,000, and go to a class or conference at some point in the future 5. Pay $10,000 and hire someone who’s done it Learn TempDB best practices
  40. 40. Pain: your application does a lot of work in TempDB, and it’s slow, and users are complaining.
  41. 41. 1. Free: Google it, read blog posts, Stack answers 2. Pay $50, and spend days reading a book 3. Pay $200, and spend hours watching a video 4. Pay $3,000, and go to a class or conference at some point in the future 5. Pay $10,000 and hire someone who’s done it Fixing slow TempDB & queries
  42. 42. Pain: your app is still slow even after the team has read a lot and tried a lot of things, and the slowness is keeping your business from selling products.
  43. 43. 1. Free: Google it, read blog posts, Stack answers 2. Pay $50, and spend days reading a book 3. Pay $200, and spend hours watching a video 4. Pay $3,000, and go to a class or conference at some point in the future 5. Pay $10,000 and hire someone who’s done it Escalating the TempDB problem
  44. 44. Pain: you want to offload report queries to a read-only server, and you want to figure out what SQL feature to use.
  45. 45. 1. Free: Google it, read blog posts, Stack answers 2. Pay $50, and spend days reading a book 3. Pay $200, and spend hours watching a video 4. Pay $3,000, and go to a class or conference at some point in the future 5. Pay $10,000 and hire someone who’s done it Picking scale-out read features
  46. 46. Pain: replication to the report server keeps breaking, and reports show old data.
  47. 47. 1. Free: Google it, read blog posts, Stack answers 2. Pay $50, and spend days reading a book 3. Pay $200, and spend hours watching a video 4. Pay $3,000, and go to a class or conference at some point in the future 5. Pay $10,000 and hire someone who’s done it Fixing replication & reports
  48. 48. Pain: replication keeps breaking, and when you re-initialize it, the primary server falls over, and takes your web site down with it.
  49. 49. 1. Free: Google it, read blog posts, Stack answers 2. Pay $50, and spend days reading a book 3. Pay $200, and spend hours watching a video 4. Pay $3,000, and go to a class or conference at some point in the future 5. Pay $10,000 and hire someone who’s done it No really, fix the replication problem
  50. 50. There’s a pattern here.
  51. 51. Mild or no business pain Severe business pain Not urgent Very urgent What do people pay for? 51
  52. 52. Mild or no business pain Severe business pain Not urgent Let’s talk about this. Very urgent What do people pay for? 52
  53. 53. “I’m curious and I just wondered something.” “I want to know best practices for ___.” “Fragmentation is high, and I want help fixing it.” Note that there’s no business risk or urgency. Not urgent, mild business pain
  54. 54. Build blog posts, YouTube videos, or other self-help resources that people can consume on their schedule Expect a lot of “just curious” questions Don’t expect any direct revenue Great for building your brand over time: • SQLAuthority.com, Books Online • Vendor webcasts Solving non-urgent, mild pains
  55. 55. Mild or no business pain Severe business pain Not urgent Very urgent Let’s talk about this. What do people pay for? 55
  56. 56. “My restore to dev is taking forever. Why?” “A long-running query is rolling back. What do I do?” “I’m building a new server for next week. How should I configure TempDB?” The urgency is coming from the SQL Server person, but not necessarily from the business users. Urgent, but mild business pain
  57. 57. In your spare time: watch #SQLhelp on Twitter, StackOverflow.com, DBA.StackExchange.com. For a living: get a database support job at Microsoft, an app vendor, or a large company. Expect to work with under-trained people who never seem to get better (but it’s just that they’re rotating.) Solving urgent (but mild) pains
  58. 58. Mild or no business pain Severe business pain Not urgent Let’s talk about this. Very urgent What do people pay for? 58
  59. 59. “Our reports are taking forever to run, and they’re slowing down production. We should build a data warehouse.” “The SAN is really slow, and we need to figure out how to make it go faster, but we don’t want to make changes to this dangerous system.” The business wants to improve something, but they’re afraid, and they know it’s a big project. Non-urgent, but painful
  60. 60. Woohoo, finally some money!
  61. 61. Long, paid engagements that involve: • Budgets (often large) • Approvals with committees • Long projects (months or years) • Full time staff positions, consultants, contractors • Vendors for hardware, software, services • Long sales cycles (months or years) Solving non-urgent, painful issues
  62. 62. Experienced architects and communicators • Neil DeGrasse Tyson • Alton Brown • Adam Savage Multiple hands-on doers: lower rates, and typically done through a big consulting/contracting company Who companies hire for this
  63. 63. “I need to build a data warehouse. What do I do?” The person asking this: • Doesn’t have any budgetary approval • Is likely getting you to do their job • Will never stop asking questions • Won’t pay you a single dime These issues pop up online too.
  64. 64. Mild or no business pain Severe business pain Not urgent Very urgent Let’s talk about this. What do people pay for? 64
  65. 65. “Our SQL Server falls over every time we run a sale, and these outages are costing us millions of dollars.” “The database is corrupt, and business has stopped.” The business wants to improve something, and money is no object, and sales cycles are short. Urgent, severe business pain
  66. 66. Large businesses call other large businesses Small businesses call other small businesses Individuals call on individuals Company size dictates pain relief 66
  67. 67. Giant companies aren’t calling you and me.
  68. 68. Large companies usually do one of these: Keep a full time team of experts on staff to put out fires as they occur, or Have a relationship with a large consulting company with a large full time team of experts, or Call hardware/software vendors for support. How large companies relieve it
  69. 69. Don’t have these urgent, severe pains very often Can’t keep a full time team of experts busy Aren’t large enough to get urgent turnaround with a large consulting company May not enjoy calling vendors for support Small to midsize companies
  70. 70. Solutions here are less about advice, more about hiring an expert to do the work right now. The budgets here are actually less than non-urgent, but severe pains – the work involved is shorter/faster. The sales cycles are very short: hours or days. The more urgent and severe the pain, the faster the sales cycle. Solving these pains for small businesses
  71. 71. “My server is down. What do I do?” Again, the person asking this: • Doesn’t have any budgetary approval • Is likely getting you to do their job • Will never stop asking questions • Often asks it in entirely the wrong place • Won’t pay you any money When a real mission-critical server is down, the business doesn’t post it on a forum. These issues pop up online too.
  72. 72. Mild or no business pain Severe business pain Not urgent Build free online resources, build up your reputation Payment: reputation Be an FTE for a large consulting company on large projects Payment: money Very urgent Work a help desk or answer Stack questions Payment: small money or reputation Be an FTE at a large company, or a consultant focusing on a specific pain point Payment: money Understand where money is. 72
  73. 73. Mild or no business pain Severe business pain Not urgent Build free online resources, build up your reputation Payment: reputation Be an FTE for a large consulting company on large projects Payment: money Very urgent Work a help desk or answer Stack questions Payment: small money or reputation Be an FTE at a large company, or a consultant focusing on a specific pain point Payment: money Understand where money is. 73 The long route: you can blog about these to gradually work your way up to fame, and then start bringing in money. This is blogging for jobs you’re applying for.
  74. 74. Pick popular topics Write one post per week for several years Work on your SEO Gradually build up an audience of thousands This is the route I took. It’s the long, slow way. Long route details 74
  75. 75. Mild or no business pain Severe business pain Not urgent Build free online resources, build up your reputation Payment: reputation Be an FTE for a large consulting company on large projects Payment: money Very urgent Work a help desk or answer Stack questions Payment: small money or reputation Be an FTE at a large company, or a consultant focusing on a specific pain point Payment: money Understand where money is. 75 Shorter route: blog about these to work your way directly into a job or consulting business. This is blogging for jobs being given to you.
  76. 76. Design the thing you want to hold in your hand in 1 year: e-book, presentation, pre-con class Write a plan to build that thing Work the plan, getting feedback from your peers, but sticking with the plan Shorter route details 76
  77. 77. Mild or no business pain Severe business pain Not urgent Build free online resources, build up your reputation Payment: reputation Be an FTE for a large consulting company on large projects Payment: money Very urgent Work a help desk or answer Stack questions Payment: small money or reputation Be an FTE at a large company, or a consultant focusing on a specific pain point Payment: money Where will you aim for this year? 77
  78. 78. Building your sharing plan Start by understanding what you can build 78
  79. 79. Inbound marketing means building stuff.
  80. 80. Building stuff takes time.
  81. 81. Define common learning/marketing tasks • How they benefit your skills • How they help your marketing • How long they take to build Define how much time you’ll dedicate per year Build a learning/marketing plan for next year Let’s cover:
  82. 82. Writing: blog posts, white papers, books Presentations at user groups, SQLSaturdays, PASS Videos: podcasts, YouTube, webcasts, video classes Social media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Networking: community volunteering, UG organizing Common learning/marketing tasks
  83. 83. They force you to learn. They help as many people as possible with as little time as possible on your part. They act as inbound marketing, gradually building up your brand. They have a stairstep approach to building a larger product that can pay you later. The best tasks do 4 things.
  84. 84. Write the 2017 pre-con abstract you want to give. Write a blog post about each bullet point. Build several of the blog posts into a 45-minute presentation. Give the presentations individually at local user groups, SQLSaturdays, and vendor webcasts. Assemble them into a 6-hour pre-con. Example: stairstep to a pre-con
  85. 85. Writing: blog posts, white papers, books Presentations at user groups, SQLSaturdays, PASS Videos: podcasts, YouTube, webcasts, video classes Social media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Networking: community volunteering, UG organizing Notice how some of these escalate?
  86. 86. Google SEO (assuming the writing is public) Does double duty: can grow into presentations Gaining new audience members over time Can even get direct payments as the material grows Writing: marketing benefits
  87. 87. Blog post: 1-8 hours White paper: 1-2 days per page, 10-30 pages typical Book: 1-2 days per page, 200-400 pages typical Writing: time requirements
  88. 88. Picking a topic Writing the first draft Following up on comments/questions White paper & book: coordinating with your publisher And on the higher end: • Demos and screenshots • Peer review • Grammatical review These estimates include:
  89. 89. If you own what you write, you can combine multiple small pieces to build one bigger, differently-marketed piece. If you write blog posts first, you can build an e-book, and either distribute it yourself or sell it. If you write a book first for a conventional publisher, you may not be able to reuse that material yourself. You have to own your work.
  90. 90. The times and places when you have ideas are different than the times and places when you write. Store your ideas somewhere: • RememberTheMilk.com • Note tools like EverNote or OneNote • Github Ideas strike constantly.
  91. 91. Set aside a window on your calendar for writing. (Mine: Saturdays & Sundays, 6AM-10AM.) Open up your idea list. Grab one, and just start writing. The first one will probably suck, and that’s okay. Just keep typing. Then, writing time is easier.
  92. 92. Never click publish. Only click Schedule.
  93. 93. Remember that first post that sucked? You may end up ripping it out of the schedule queue, but leaving it in your idea list. Build up a rhythm with your readers: • BrentOzar.com – Tues, Weds, Thurs • Ozar.me – Tuesday mornings No blog post goes live until you have 3 in the queue. Your work should be timeless anyway, right? (News journalism is different – but it’s throwaway work.) Scheduling blog posts
  94. 94. You have a limited amount of time, so: • Write evergreen content. • Build up towards something larger. • Write a table of contents for an e-book or a one-day training class. • If a post topic doesn’t fit into your e-book or class, and it doesn’t convey your brand, think twice. Build up. Avoid throwaway work.
  95. 95. “How” posts give detailed instructions and checklists. • They’re great for SEO – people are looking for specific instructions on how to do complex stuff. • However, people don’t want to read “how” posts unless they’re solving a specific problem. “Why” posts talk about concepts. • Regular readers love you for these. • But few people search for these kinds of posts. Why vs how: you need both.
  96. 96. On writing days, don’t write until you run dry. Stop short. Leave yourself a cool place to start on your next writing day.
  97. 97. Blog post: 1-8 hours White paper: 1-2 days per page, 10-30 pages typical Book: 1-2 days per page, 200-400 pages typical Writing time requirements
  98. 98. Writing: blog posts, white papers, books Presentations at user groups, SQLSaturdays, PASS Videos: podcasts, YouTube, webcasts, video classes Social media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Networking: community volunteering, UG organizing Next let’s cover presenting.
  99. 99. Builds your brand in front of customers: your audience is your future customer base. Can get direct payment in the form of conference fees, pre- con classes, and training class ticket sales, but only after a few years. Marketing benefits of presenting
  100. 100. Your audience is your future customer base, but that future is almost never tomorrow or next week. It’s not for everybody. With every session, your work disappears into thin air. Drawbacks of presenting
  101. 101. 5-10 minute lightning talk: 1-2 hours 1-hour user group session: 8-16 hours 6-hour pre-con: 48-96 hours One-week class: 6-12 weeks Don’t build 6-hour or one-week classes from scratch. Time requirements
  102. 102. 1. Write the 2017 pre-con abstract you want to give. 2. Write a blog post about each bullet point. 3. Build several of the blog posts into a 45-minute presentation. 4. Give the presentations individually at local user groups, SQLSaturdays, and vendor webcasts. 5. Assemble them into a 6-hour pre-con. Stairstep to a pre-con
  103. 103. Writing: blog posts, white papers, books Presentations at user groups, SQLSaturdays, PASS Videos: podcasts, YouTube, webcasts, video classes I put these in order for a reason.
  104. 104. Writing: blog posts, white papers, books Presentations at user groups, SQLSaturdays, PASS Videos: podcasts, YouTube, webcasts, video classes Social media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Networking: community volunteering, UG organizing Next let’s cover videos.
  105. 105. Can leverage the posts and presentations you’ve built Builds a cult of personality that writing can’t: people feel like they know you already Marketing benefits of videos
  106. 106. Google SEO is harder Videos are harder to scan and digest fast People may not stick around for the whole thing Good production quality is time-consuming Harder to reuse video content into a paid product (without taking the free videos down first) Drawbacks of videos (vs writing)
  107. 107. Podcast or YouTube video: 5x the runtime (10 minute podcast = 50 minutes of work) Webcast: 2-4x the runtime (1 hour webcast = 2-4 hours of work) Video class: 10x-20x the runtime These estimates do not include content authoring. Time requirements
  108. 108. Set up and maintain your audio/video gear Record/deliver the material Polish it up in post-production (fix goofs, add titles) Webcast and classes: coordinate w/revenue collectors And on the higher end: pitching to revenue collectors, peer review, updating material Why so long? You have to:
  109. 109. Getting started with webcasts Gear Model Price Webcam Logitech C930e USB – autofocus lens, wide field of view $110 Microphone Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 USB Studio Package – microphone, preamp, headphones $250 Mic stand Neewer Microphone Boom Scissor Arm $15 Mic shock mount Olymstore Metal Shock Mount $15 Total $390
  110. 110. YouTube videos: • Build your reputation over time • Easy to embed in your own blog Live webcasts: • More fun with audience interaction (if you get it) • Harder to record with good quality • If you can’t get good recordings, this is throwaway work, so it’d better pay off. The end result
  111. 111. Periscope: live videos from your phone Twitch, Google Hangouts: people watch you do stuff Vendor webcasts: • Get paid to deliver inbound marketing content • Vendor manages the infrastructure, recordings • You don’t get the leads, so include your brand and links to your work If you’re doing throwaway work:
  112. 112. Pluralsight: • Members pay monthly fee • You get paid based on viewed hours, contract • Can also get an up-front production fee • You don’t get info about your customers • Screencasts only, no personal branding • Tough abstract review process, competition Udemy, Kajabi Next: you set the topic and the content, and collect a percentage of each sale. Self-hosted: you control everything. Video training class hosting
  113. 113. Podcast or YouTube video: 5x the runtime (10 minute podcast = 50 minutes of work) Webcast: 2-4x the runtime (1 hour webcast = 2-4 hours of work) Video class: 10x-20x the runtime Outsourcing: Odesk, Elance These estimates do not include content authoring. Time requirements
  114. 114. Writing: blog posts, white papers, books Presentations at user groups, SQLSaturdays, PASS Videos: podcasts, YouTube, webcasts, video classes Social media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram Networking: community volunteering, UG organizing Recap of your inbound tools
  115. 115. Define common learning/marketing tasks • How they benefit your skills • How they help your marketing • How long they take to build Define how much time you’ll dedicate per year Build a learning/marketing plan for 2016 Now let’s cover the last two.
  116. 116. Block out time for work, family, hobbies. What’s left? Be realistic about your work week. Sun Mon Tues Weds Thurs Fri Sat 6-8AM 8-10 10-Noon Noon-2 2-4PM 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-Midnt
  117. 117. Writing: Blog post: takes average of 4 hours Presenting: 1-hour user group session: 12 hours Video/webcast: 1-hour runtime: 4 hours (after writing the presentation) Other tasks to block out time for: learning, researching topics, playing with blog themes Task time requirements
  118. 118. My personal building hours: Sat & Sun, 6AM-10AM That’s 8 hours per week, which means I either do: • 2 blog posts, or • 1 blog post, and work on my blog plumbing (SEO, Google Analytics, themes), or • A presentation like this one (which I did on a couple of weekends) • Learning/research At the end of a year, I (hopefully) have 52 blog posts that I can bundle together into a class or an e-book. This becomes your sharing plan.
  119. 119. 120
  120. 120. It means your work has to: • Be evergreen (timeless) • Roll into a snowball • Be perfict • Serve as many purposes as possible Your time is the hardest part. 121
  121. 121. Marketing I promise this isn’t as sleazy as it sounds 122
  122. 122. First, know yourself. No, do not take your clothes off. 123
  123. 123. I’ll show you a brand. Write down 3 words.
  124. 124. Your brand is what you mean to people. 129
  125. 125. Your product and what it does Your customer Quality: top tier or everyday Cost: luxury item or bargain Accessibility and friendliness Your place in the market relative to others Brand words can describe…
  126. 126. Companies take this seriously.
  127. 127. Know yourself, and what makes you unique.
  128. 128. 2010: Technical, approachable, and likeable.
  129. 129. 2016: pain-relieving, experienced, and provocative.
  130. 130. What you do, who you do it for, quality, cost, accessibility, availability, your place in the market, where you live, your hobbies, family, pets … driven, results oriented, motivated, genuine, trustworthy, goto, trusted advisor, reliable, confident, honest, connected, people, technology, omniscient, customer obsession, leading, honesty, integrity, loyalty, skill, deep, clear, communicator, reliable, thorough, caring, reliable, pragmatic, friendly, data, automation, guidance, data mining, automation, community, approachable, problem-solving, teacher, leader, authentic, realistic, well-connected, experienced, trustworthy, leadership, honest, integrity, creativity, informed, special operations, productive, honorable, dependable, connected, knowledgeable, helpful, teacher, passionate, energetic, excited, results oriented, British, dataveloper, bridge, funformative Pick 3-10 words to describe you.
  131. 131. Easier to stand out in a crowd Less people compete with you Your message is easier to hear Unique, specific brands are strong.
  132. 132. If you’re trying to be the same thing that everyone else is trying to be: • You have too many competitors • You have too low-priced of competitors • You have to spend a fortune to get your message out “I compete with the Geek Quad, Microsoft support, huge consulting companies like IBM, and everybody in between.” Similar, general brands are weak.
  133. 133. Pick the 3 words that stand out from others, and mean the most to you.
  134. 134. Use them in a sentence or two Describe your service Be comfortable saying this out loud These words are your elevator pitch. 139
  135. 135. Marketing: inbound or outbound? 140
  136. 136. Marketing is simply getting the public to know your 3 words.
  137. 137. If you’re only doing marketing part time, your brand name has to be your own name. Sure, it’s fun to think of funny stuff like @SQLSuperhero. But you don’t have enough marketing resources to own that brand name outright. If you have a common name, use your full name. 1. Picking a brand name
  138. 138. Outbound marketing: fast, but expensive gamble: • Design ad campaigns telling people about your brand, emphasizing your brand words • Buy a lot of ad space, and put your ads there Inbound marketing: slow, but cheap and sure thing: • Build valuable content that people want • Build your brand image into that content • People look for your content and learn your brand 2. Getting people to memorize it
  139. 139. If you know a topic well, you want inbound marketing.
  140. 140. Writing: blog posts, white papers, books Presentations at user groups, SQLSaturdays, PASS Videos: podcasts, YouTube, webcasts, video classes Social media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram The stuff you build has to convey your brand words. Inbound marketing tools
  141. 141. Stories about experiences Code samples Pictures and art Topics Put your brand in what you build
  142. 142. Take a lesson from outbound marketing: Outbound marketing is not subtle.
  143. 143. Inbound marketing can’t be subtle either.
  144. 144. Build things people want to read or consume. Inside the things, include your brand words or themes. Don’t be afraid to repeat your brand words over and over and over and over and over and over and over. Doing inbound marketing
  145. 145. Writing: blog posts, white papers, books Presentations at user groups, SQLSaturdays, PASS Videos: podcasts, YouTube, webcasts, video classes Social media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram They will pay you to build it, and they don’t mind if it has your brand words too. Vendors want inbound material too.
  146. 146. Giving it away 159
  147. 147. 160
  148. 148. What’s your product?
  149. 149. When you’re trying to sell a book or a video, it’s obvious. You charge for the product, but you give away your time. When you’re trying to get a job, the product is you. Give away your work online, but charge for your time.
  150. 150. Examples of free stuff The Martian by Andy Weir Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom by Cory Doctorow Linux by Linus Torvalds 163
  151. 151. Examples of free stuff The Martian by Andy Weir Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom by Cory Doctorow Linux by Linus Torvalds Answers at StackOverflow.com, DBA.StackExchange.com Training at SQLServerCentral.com, SQLPerformance.com Scripts like Ola.Hallengren.com, sp_WhoIsActive 164
  152. 152. The 500-Level Career Secrets If it can be given away for free, someone will. If you can give it away for free, then you should. Giving knowledge, scripts, videos away for free will build you an online reputation. If you build a 12-month plan and stick to it, you can win. 165
  153. 153. Resources 16 6
  154. 154. Getting Things Done by David Allen Permission Marketing by Seth Godin The Lean Startup by Eric Ries Blue Ocean Strategy by Mauborgne & Kim ProBlogger by Garrett & Rowse The Secrets of Consulting by Gerald Weinberg 50 Management Ideas by Russell-Walling The Cluetrain Manifesto, Theses 1-40 Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom by Cory Doctorow Books I recommend, in order
  155. 155. My bookmarks: pinboard.in/u:brento
  156. 156. Tags to check out: • Business • Career • Inspiration • Management • Startup My bookmarks: pinboard.in/u:brento 169
  157. 157. Steve Kamb – NerdFitness.com, Level Up Your Life Mike Taber & Rob Walling – StartupsForTheRestOfUs.com, FounderCafe.com Brennan Dunn – DoubleYourFreelancing.com People who’ve done it and shared 170
  158. 158. Recap 17 1
  159. 159. Why We Gotta Do It: • What success means to me • Why salespeople get it, and I don’t Building the Project Plan: • Learning what you get paid for • Defining what you’re good at now • Designing your 1-year sharing plan Phase 1: Starting a Presence Phase 2: Spreading the Word Marketing: • Knowing what makes you, you • Inbound vs outbound marketing • Why you have to give it all away Agenda 172
  160. 160. Thank You Learn more from Brent Ozar help@brentozar.com or follow @BrentO

×