WELCOME
Organized by: Lunch Supported by:
Tweet/Post: #BCFood
Framing Food
Systems Thinking	
  
Objec'ves:	
  
•  To	
  bring	
  together	
  cross-­‐sector	
  stakeholders	
  in	
  the...
Framing Food
Systems Thinking	
  
An'cipated	
  outcomes:	
  
•  The	
  development	
  of	
  new	
  and/or	
  strengthened...
Framing Food Systems Thinking
	
  
“Food	
  system	
  thinking	
  is	
  a	
  way	
  of	
  seeing	
  the	
  
bigger	
  pict...
Framing Food Systems Thinking
	
  
“Food system thinking” recognizes that:
•  complex issues are linked
•  there are multi...
Framing Food Systems Thinking
	
  
“Food system thinking” is a means to:
•  Express and act on strategy
•  Engage and alig...
www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/fer'leground	
  
www.nourishlife.org/teach/curriculum/	
  
www.nourishlife.org/teach/curriculum/	
  
www.metrovancouver.org/PLANNING/DEVELOPMENT/AGRICULTUREANDFOOD/Pages/
RegionalFoodSystemStrategy.aspx	
  
From	
  Heidi	
  Bohan,	
  The	
  People	
  of	
  Cascadia	
  
Video:
Where Does Our Food Come From?
By Herb Barbolet
https://vimeo.com/37324389
A
B
C
D
E
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
A
B
C
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
A Co...
blogs.worldwatch.org/
nourishingtheplanet/
infographics	
  
Seven Lessons for Leaders in Systems Change
1.  To promote systems change, foster community and
cultivate networks.
2.  Wo...
Mapping the System:
Sector Strengths & Shadows
Identifying Innovation
Bright Spots
Social Innovation:
“Social	
  innova+on	
  is	
  any	
  ini+a+ve,	
  product,	
  program,	
  
pla7orm	
  or	
  design	
  t...
Social Innovation:
•  Social	
  innova'ons	
  involve	
  ins'tu'onal	
  and	
  
social	
  system	
  change	
  
•  They	
  ...
Making Connections &
Identifying Opportunities
Leverage Points for
Collective Impact:
Open Space Discussions
Next Steps & Closing
THANK YOU
Framing Food Systems Thinking at Cultivating Food Systems Connections For Collective Impact Symposium
Framing Food Systems Thinking at Cultivating Food Systems Connections For Collective Impact Symposium
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Framing Food Systems Thinking at Cultivating Food Systems Connections For Collective Impact Symposium

  1. 1. WELCOME Organized by: Lunch Supported by:
  2. 2. Tweet/Post: #BCFood
  3. 3. Framing Food Systems Thinking   Objec'ves:   •  To  bring  together  cross-­‐sector  stakeholders  in  the  BC  food  system  to   develop  rela'onships     •  To  daylight  the  system  in  the  room  and  jointly  learn  about  [food]  systems   thinking   •  To  employ  food  systems  thinking  to  create  a  shared  understanding  of  the   BC  food  system     •  To  employ  food  systems  thinking  to  iden'fy  strategic  leverage  points  in   the  BC  food  system  for  collec've  impact  
  4. 4. Framing Food Systems Thinking   An'cipated  outcomes:   •  The  development  of  new  and/or  strengthened  cross  sector  rela'onships  –   making  connec'ons   •  The  development  of  a  systems  map  for  the  BC  food  system  –  shared   understandings   •  The  iden'fica'on  of  opportuni'es  for  collec've  impact  –  leverage  points   and  strategies  
  5. 5. Framing Food Systems Thinking   “Food  system  thinking  is  a  way  of  seeing  the   bigger  picture,  of  developing  solu'ons  to  food   problems  by  seeing  and  leveraging  their   connec'ons  to  other  issues.”   Toronto  Public  Health,  Cul'va'ng  Food  Connec'ons,  2010  
  6. 6. Framing Food Systems Thinking   “Food system thinking” recognizes that: •  complex issues are linked •  there are multiple actors in the system and they are connected •  integrated solutions are required MacRae  &  Donahue,  Municipal  Food  Policy  Entrepeneurs,  2013  
  7. 7. Framing Food Systems Thinking   “Food system thinking” is a means to: •  Express and act on strategy •  Engage and align diverse actors •  Link health, environment and justice concerns with economic issues MacRae  &  Donahue,  Municipal  Food  Policy  Entrepeneurs,  2013  
  8. 8. www.vitalsignscanada.ca/en/fer'leground  
  9. 9. www.nourishlife.org/teach/curriculum/  
  10. 10. www.nourishlife.org/teach/curriculum/  
  11. 11. www.metrovancouver.org/PLANNING/DEVELOPMENT/AGRICULTUREANDFOOD/Pages/ RegionalFoodSystemStrategy.aspx  
  12. 12. From  Heidi  Bohan,  The  People  of  Cascadia  
  13. 13. Video: Where Does Our Food Come From? By Herb Barbolet https://vimeo.com/37324389
  14. 14. A B C D E K L M N O P Q A B C J K L M N O P Q 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 A Collaborative Roadmap for Achieving Community Food Security in the Capital Regional District – Final Version 01 06 14 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 COMMUNITY FOOD NETWORK ASSETS, RESOURCES AND INVESTMENTS An up-to-date inventory of all food network assets and resources is maintained AR 02 Develop a public-private investment strategy AR 01 Create a database of food network assets IMPACTS Food Literacy and Knowledge FL 05 Develop a program to build public awareness of the benefits of local food production FL 03 Develop a communication program to build public understanding of the food network People know the value of and support local food production FL 06 Incorporate the health connection into food literacy programs People have convenient access to food preparation tools and facilities Food Access and Consumption AC 02 Encourage and promote production and availability of a variety of culturally appropriate foods Foods consistent with cultural traditions are readily accessible AC 07 Expand community kitchen programs People know where to obtain healthy, affordable food, e.g. local markets AC 01 Develop strategy for communicating locations of healthy foods, e.g., web, social media Food cooperatives and buying clubs provide affordable access to healthy food Appropriate food programs are in place for food insecure people AC 03 Increase involvement of food insecure people in defining emergency food programs AC 05 Expand cooperative food buying options Welcoming community kitchens are established Emergency food programs reliably and equitably provide sufficient healthy food to food insecure people AC 04 Increase emergency food capacity Locally produced food is readily accessible AC 12 Increase promotion of local food in food retail industry and markets 10 11 12 13 Food Recovery and Waste Management Food recovery resources and infrastructure are in place, e.g. gleaning Legal safeguards protect food contributors against liability FR 03 Ensure food recovery practices meet legal requirements FR 01 Enhance food recovery programs FR 10 Increase composting support and training programs Non commercial excess food is recovered efficiently and reliably for distribution FR 02 Enhance food recovery support programs Community supports food recovery Bylaws, policies and guidelines support food composting FR 09 Enhance bylaws and policies that encourage and support composting 07 08 09 Food for the food insecure population is effectively distributed There is a safe, efficient and effective food delivery infrastructure, e.g. vehicles FD 05 Define transportation needs and obtain needed funding Up-to-date information is available on the food insecure population FD 02 Continuously assess demand of food insecure population FD 04 Create network of food distribution HUBS Food Distribution Network Up-to-date information is available on emergency food sources FD 01 Create information database on emergency food availability 02 03 04 05 Local Food Storage and Processing SP 08 Review and amend bylaws to support urban food storage and food processing facilities SP 04 Establish cost effective food hubs, e.g., a community owned and operated food hub SP 01 Develop a public communication program to build public support for storage and processing facilities There is political and community support for local storage and processing facilities Local or mobile abattoirs are available to local farmers SP 03 Establish local or mobile abattoirs for small farmers and food processors Small food processors receive technical & business support SP 05 Establish food business incubators AR 06 Establish an effective volunteer recruitment and retention strategy Food network models support financial sustainability AR 03 Implement financially sustainable business models for the food network Food network is financially self sustaining AR 04 Establish cost effective food hubs, e.g., a community owned and operated food hub Shared food infrastructure decreases food network costs D E F G H I Poverty is alleviated Adequate affordable housing is available Strong sense of community Adequate employment opportunities are available Environment is healthy Nutritious food is contributing to a healthy population A local food network contributes to the social and economic health of the community A sustainable food network that fosters resilience to climate variability and supports long term environmental health A food network that supports and celebrates cultural diversity & food choices A healthy food network that contributes to a resilient community A food secure community provides healthy, sufficient and affordable food for everyone in a coordinated, environmentally responsible and financially sustainable manner The need for emergency food by food insecure people is eliminated The health and quality of life for people in the Capital Region is enhanced ENABLING CAPABILITIES Food is distributed according to good environmental practices FD 07 Coordinate distribution of food to decrease environmental impacts FL 07 Enhance relationships with institutions that provide education programs There is an efficient network of food storage and distribution facilities Investments in the food network support financial sustainability Guidelines & training exist for food recovery FR 05 Establish guidelines and training for commercial food recovery Food insecure people have reliable and affordable access to healthy food There is a variety of options for people to grow their own food Appropriate food safety standards and practices are in place SP 07 Establish appropriate food safety standards, practices, policies and regulations Standards, practices and controls are in place to ensure food is fresh and safe Food waste is minimized Food storage & processing facilities and equipment are accessible to small farmers and food processors at low cost Local zoning and policies support storage and processing facilities The shelf life of local food is increased Small farmers and food processors have the knowledge and skills to store and process food safely SP 02 Provide small farmers & processors with training on safe food storage and processing More food is processed locally There are more businesses processing local food Small food processors have access to affordable capital SP 06 Establish private and public food processor loan and grant programs Food is distributed effectively and quickly in a community emergency FD 08 Incorporate food distribution into community emergency preparedness plans Food distribution practices ensure food safety FD 06 Implement appropriate food distribution safety standards, practices and regulations Food is distributed in a timely and cost effective way to minimize spoilage and waste FD 03 Establish cost effective & timely food distribution methods for small farmers and food processors Local food is distributed cost effectively Household kitchen waste is composted People support and know how to compost Convenient and efficient composting infrastructure is in place FR 08 Increase network of composting facilities Non recoverable compostable food is composted FR 07 Establish composting guidelines and support for non-recoverable food Commercial food providers efficiently and reliably recover food for distribution Food contributors receive public recognition and appreciation FR 04 Enhance public recognition programs for food contributors There are sufficient people resources in place to effectively maintain the community food network Food network utilizes, shares and recognizes volunteers effectively AR 05 Enhance programs to supplement wages where needed to ensure a living wage People have a choice of healthy foods & meals when eating out People have the knowledge and skills to choose healthy foods and prepare healthy meals AC 11 Increase accessible food literacy education programs including school curricula See local food production People have convenient access to a choice of healthy, affordable foods People have affordable, convenient and reliable access to a variety of healthy, culturally appropriate foods, including local food, to meet dietary needs AC 08 Create/amend bylaws and policies to support access to healthy food and food literacy Bylaws and policies support access to and consumption of healthy and local food Public institutions, e.g. schools, provide healthy foods including local food AC 09 Encourage institutions to promote and provide healthy food options and local food Restaurants provide healthy food options, including local food AC 10 Encourage restaurants to promote and provide healthy food options and local food See local food production Healthy food and meals are delivered to those who are unable to access or prepare food Meal delivery infrastructure is in place AC 06 Enhance meal delivery programs People understand how their food network operates People share knowledge and experience to increase food literacy FL 02 Enhance formal and informal networks to share and exchange food knowledge and experience FL 08 Incorporate a food literacy perspective in government planning and policy frameworks Food literacy is supported by government policies People learn the health benefits of healthy, nutritious food People increase food literacy through education programs There is a wide range of accessible food literacy education programs People are food literate and understand and apply the benefits of a secure food network to personal and community health and well being Communication technologies support knowledge sharing FL 01 Utilize communication technologies, e.g., Internet and social media for knowledge sharing People understand the food network and the links to personal health and community wellbeing People understand the linkage of the food network to community wellbeing FL 04 Develop a program to build public understanding of the link between the food network & wellbeing 15 16 15 16 COORDINATION, COLLABORATION & PARTNERSHIPS Accountability to community for food network performance is enhanced Mechanisms are in place to monitor food network performance Activities in the community food network are coordinated effectively The food network performance is monitored and managed effectively CP 07 Provide CR-FAIR with long term  core  ‘secretariat’   funding CP 04 Establish a coordinated advocacy strategy CP 02 Develop a Strategy Roadmap setting strategic direction and priorities CP 03 Establish a community based Food Policy Council Priorities are established for strategic community investments Food network obtains needed political and community support and investments All food network stakeholders are engaged in defining needs and priorities Community food network communication to stakeholders is effective Researchers effectively undertake food network studies and projects CP 06 Establish partnerships to conduct studies and projects A community food network communication strategy exists CP 08 Establish collaboration strategy, training & coaching programs A food network coordination & communication function exists Key performance targets are established for the community food network CP 09 Establish food network key performance monitoring processes Information sharing supports partnerships and collaboration Organizations have the capabilities to collaborate effectively Community food network is an effective food advocate Municipal and provincial legislation, bylaws and policies support the food network CP 05 Incorporate a food security perspective in government planning and policy frameworks There is a coordinated and consistent food security focus to all government policies CP 01 Create a community-driven process for the food network strategy All stakeholders participate in setting the strategy, goals & priorities for the community food networkCommunity food network has the means to agree strategy and priorities Food network is guided by a strategic vision, action plan and targets The resources, assets and investments are in place to build sustainable food network capabilities The community food network is strategically lead, coordinated and guided by community based strategic action plans Synergistic and effective partnerships are established INNOVATION AND EFFECTIVE PRACTICES Food network encourages the sharing of innovations and practices The most appropriate innovations and practices are adopted, adapted or developed IE 03 Identify sources of food innovation investments Food network’s   research capacity is increased IE 02 Establish research partnerships IE 01 Establish forums for innovation and information/ experience sharing Food network has a culture of innovation and sharing New ideas, innovations and practices are identified and evaluated Investments are available for testing and implementing innovations and practices The food network adopts, adapts and develops innovations and effective practices A sustainable and adaptive community food network is enabled through collaboration, investments and innovation A living wage is paid to those working in the food network The food network provides employment opportunities for food insecure people Food network assets & resources are shared whenever possible Community food self- sufficiency and resilience are increased The community has an increased supply of fresh and processed local food Food is distributed efficiently, safely, and in an environmentally sustainable manner People have access to a variety of healthy food options through a reliable, safe and environmentally responsible community food network Food network provides volunteer opportunities to the community AR 07 Enhance subsidy programs for volunteers, e.g., transportation assistance, childcare Support programs are in place to allow people to participate as volunteers The composting of household and non recoverable food waste is maximized Food supply is increased through effective, safe and environmentally responsible food recovery and waste management FR 06 Increase distribution of compost to local farms Local retention of soil nutrients is maximized Other determinants of Quality of Life Impact Strategic outcome Key enabling outcome outcome Action LEGEND Capability Facilitated by the Victoria Integral Strategy Practice May 2013 Sponsored By F G H I J Local Food Production There are a variety of land options for individuals to grow and raise food Small farmers have access to affordable capital Individuals have the knowledge and skills to grow and raise food Local food industries & institutions use, sell & promote local food products FP 13 Enhance promotion to local businesses to buy local food FP 08 Amend local bylaws to support & encourage urban agriculture FP 07 Enhance education and training on food production practices FP 16 Establish private and public farmer loan and grant programs FP 15 Establish and support food business incubator programs Food business incubators encourage & support small farmers FP 11 Increase education on environmentally sustainable food production practices Local food production is environmentally sustainable Local agricultural land is protected FP 04 Establish community land trust to support local food production FP 10 Educate people on opportunities to obtain local food Local food sources such as hunting and fishing are better utilized in a sustainable manner FP 02 Establish farm succession program FP 11 Identify priorities and amend appropriate bylaws and policies The  community’s   capacity to produce local food is maximized Local bylaws and policies encourage and support urban food production Commercial urban farming is increased FP 05 Increase community support for urban farming Individuals have the resources to grow and raise food FP 09 Increase affordable options for people to obtain/share food production resources, e.g. tools Non commercial local food production is increased More people want to grow and raise their food FP 06 Enhance public education programs to promote the benefits of local food production FP 01 Enhance consumer awareness campaigns for local foods Consumers appreciate the value of local food Local food production by small farmers is increased Existing farms remain in food production FP 14 Establish entrepreneurship, farmer skills and safety training programs Small farmers have access to education & training There is an adequate supply of farmers Sufficient land is available at affordable prices FP 03 Encourage landowners to rent land to small farmers at affordable prices More agricultural land is brought into food production Small farming is a viable business Small farmers obtain added value from their produce Priority Action h^p://www.communitycouncil.ca/ini'a'ves/crfair/food-­‐systems.html  
  15. 15. blogs.worldwatch.org/ nourishingtheplanet/ infographics  
  16. 16. Seven Lessons for Leaders in Systems Change 1.  To promote systems change, foster community and cultivate networks. 2.  Work at multiple levels of scale. 3.  Make space for self-organization. 4.  Seize breakthrough opportunities when they arise. 5.  Facilitate — but give up the illusion that you can direct — change. 6.  Assume that change is going to take time. 7.  Be prepared to be surprised. Stone  and  Barlow  from  www.ecoliteracy.org/essays/seven-­‐lessons-­‐leaders-­‐systems-­‐change  
  17. 17. Mapping the System: Sector Strengths & Shadows
  18. 18. Identifying Innovation Bright Spots
  19. 19. Social Innovation: “Social  innova+on  is  any  ini+a+ve,  product,  program,   pla7orm  or  design  that  challenges  and  over  +me   changes  the  defining  rou$nes,  resource  and  authority   flows,  or  beliefs  of  the  social  system  in  which  the   innova+on  occurs.  Successful  social  innova+ons  have   durability,  scale  and  transforma+ve  impact.”                      -­‐Frances  Westley  
  20. 20. Social Innovation: •  Social  innova'ons  involve  ins'tu'onal  and   social  system  change   •  They  contribute  to  overall  social-­‐ecological   resilience  
  21. 21. Making Connections & Identifying Opportunities
  22. 22. Leverage Points for Collective Impact: Open Space Discussions
  23. 23. Next Steps & Closing
  24. 24. THANK YOU

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