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“I choose brands that I believe to be a reflection of myself”
Something has
changed!Communicating your brand is not as easy as
it used to be
What Is Behind
Your Brand?
There Are
Danger Signs
• Margins are eroding
• Market place is getting more crowded
• Market segmentation is driving your ...
Debunking
Brand Myths
Branding
Mythology
Branding Myths
Brand is your logo and mark
Re-branding means you need to
change your name.
Brand tells the consumer what y...
“Re-branding
means a name
change”
Only 25% of our consumer
clients end up with a change in
brand name.
Often, re-branding entails
assigning new and more
pow...
“Brand tells the
traveler who we
are or what we do”
Your corporate identity tells
the customer who you are —
your brand does not.
Brand is not a description of
your business ...
“Being first in the market is most important.”
!
“Being best ensures your success”
No, being first only assures your brand
of an entrance opportunity. The market
graveyard is littered with failed and
faili...
In 1959 P&G launched
Pampers brand disposable
diapers.
Pampers was first
0
25
50
75
100
1959 1960 1961 1962 1968
Cloth Disposable Other Competitors
Pampers built the category and
by 1968 they owned the category
— with the brand name becoming
synonymous with the delivery...
Kimberly-Clark entered the market with Huggies.
!
It quickly become P&Gs biggest competitor. But Pampers forged
on. They s...
0
25
50
75
100
1959 1960 1961 1962 1968 1970 1975 1985 1995 1999 2000 2003 2005
Cloth Pampers Luvs Huggies
Pampers sold the best diaper money could
buy.
Huggies sold the best mother you could
possibly be.
Huggies built a brand an...
“Being best is most
important”
Brand is not about a product’s efficacy.
Best in category is no REAL promise of
success.
Your margins reside in your brand...
In 1997 Apple introduced the iMac.
A revolution in internet connectivity.
In 2002 Apple introduced OS X, its 10th operatin...
Microsoft received a license to package its DOS with every PC
manufactured. Aside from the tightly held Apple market, the ...
0
25
50
75
100
1980 1982 1984 1986 1995 2000 2003
Apple Macintosh DOS Machines Windows Machines Other Small Computers
Brand
Customers cannot choose what they do
not know.
Preference is created through a critical
mixture of brand meaning (im...
Lipton
Tetley
0.0 22.5 45.0 67.5 90.0
Market Share Aided Awareness
US Tea Market
“You can build a brand even
if you don’t advertise”
All evidence is to the contrary.
Brand meaning is a definition maintained
by the customer.
Without speaking that meaning w...
.
!
Both of these brands totally control a retail brand environment in which the
brand is meticulously managed to create a...
The business of your business
and the business of your brand
Corporate identity
Efficacy
Consistency
Product/Service
What ...
Corporate identity
Efficacy
Consistency
Product/Service
What you sell
W
hat you do
or what you m
ake
The business of your ...
Customer
Brand Is
Anthropology
• Marketing is what you sell
• Brand is the person you influence
Brand
permission
How We choose
• Brand choices are a direct consequence of strongly held beliefs
• Robust brands are a well polished reflection of those ...
How beliefs influence the laundry soap purchase decisions
Use bleach Use liquid Use powder Use additives Use softener Use ...
Core
Customer
World View
The representation of the core customer (and those that
the core customer identifies intimately w...
Core
Customer
World View
The representation of the core customer (and those that
the core customer identifies intimately w...
Core
Customer
Processes
Purposes
World View
Precept
The representation of the core customer (and those that
the core custo...
Brands are built
around precepts
• Marketing arguments are built around purposes
• Brand gives your marketing strategy per...
®
B E Y O N D T H E O R Y
www.stealingshare.com
!
Stealing Share, Inc
Suite 816, 301 S Elm Street, Greensboro, NC 27401 • ...
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Top Myths in Rebranding

Communicating your brand is not as easy as it once was. For many, margins are eroding, the market is getting more crowded and market segmentation is driving business.

To win in this environment, first consider the myths about rebranding that simply are not true. This presentation takes the example of destinations, but explores other markets to demonstrate what really is true about rebranding.

The primary takeaway is answering the question; What do you need to do right in order to make your brand more meaningful and actually steal market share?

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Top Myths in Rebranding

  1. 1. “I choose brands that I believe to be a reflection of myself”
  2. 2. Something has changed!Communicating your brand is not as easy as it used to be
  3. 3. What Is Behind Your Brand?
  4. 4. There Are Danger Signs • Margins are eroding • Market place is getting more crowded • Market segmentation is driving your business
  5. 5. Debunking Brand Myths Branding Mythology
  6. 6. Branding Myths Brand is your logo and mark Re-branding means you need to change your name. Brand tells the consumer what you do. Being first is most important. Being best is most important. Brand awareness = market share. Market segmentation is the way to
  7. 7. “Re-branding means a name change”
  8. 8. Only 25% of our consumer clients end up with a change in brand name. Often, re-branding entails assigning new and more powerful meaning to an existing brand mark or icon.
  9. 9. “Brand tells the traveler who we are or what we do”
  10. 10. Your corporate identity tells the customer who you are — your brand does not. Brand is not a description of your business it is a description of your customer. The business of your business is in promoting and managing your destination or service. The business of your brand... well, that’s all about your customer’s view of themselves.
  11. 11. “Being first in the market is most important.” ! “Being best ensures your success”
  12. 12. No, being first only assures your brand of an entrance opportunity. The market graveyard is littered with failed and failing “firsts.” Miller Lite is a perfect example. Being biggest simply says no one has successfully challenged you. SONY was once the world’s biggest electronics brand. Today they have given up leadership in VCRs, TV’s and just about every other category that they once dominated.
  13. 13. In 1959 P&G launched Pampers brand disposable diapers. Pampers was first
  14. 14. 0 25 50 75 100 1959 1960 1961 1962 1968 Cloth Disposable Other Competitors
  15. 15. Pampers built the category and by 1968 they owned the category — with the brand name becoming synonymous with the delivery system. It quickly became P&Gs most profitable and dominant brand. The brand continued to build the category stressing product efficacy and innovation. But something happened in 1968.
  16. 16. Kimberly-Clark entered the market with Huggies. ! It quickly become P&Gs biggest competitor. But Pampers forged on. They sold leakage protection, barrier leg cuffs, absorbency and a host of other product innovations. What they did not sell was a brand. ! P&G looked to further segment its market and launched LUVS.
  17. 17. 0 25 50 75 100 1959 1960 1961 1962 1968 1970 1975 1985 1995 1999 2000 2003 2005 Cloth Pampers Luvs Huggies
  18. 18. Pampers sold the best diaper money could buy. Huggies sold the best mother you could possibly be. Huggies built a brand and Pampers built a great category.
  19. 19. “Being best is most important”
  20. 20. Brand is not about a product’s efficacy. Best in category is no REAL promise of success. Your margins reside in your brand equity and not in your product’s efficacy.
  21. 21. In 1997 Apple introduced the iMac. A revolution in internet connectivity. In 2002 Apple introduced OS X, its 10th operating system. The UNIX based system is virtually crash proof and has shown itself to be at least 5 years ahead of the latest Windows release. Apple’s Tiger increased the advantage by another couple of years. In 1984 they introduced the Macintosh. With a graphic operating system and heretofore unheard of graphic capabilities. It was a milestone. Mac’s system was 15 years ahead of the competition. Apple computer became a market leader in the early 80s with their Apple II.
  22. 22. Microsoft received a license to package its DOS with every PC manufactured. Aside from the tightly held Apple market, the only competitor to DOS was a grouping of non-compatible proprietary systems (Commodore, TI, etc...) Was the market leader in computing. Their mainframe systems had set the world standard for 20 years Based on Apple’s success, IBM sees an opportunity to grab additional markets, IBM launched the PC Jr. in the early 80’s.
  23. 23. 0 25 50 75 100 1980 1982 1984 1986 1995 2000 2003 Apple Macintosh DOS Machines Windows Machines Other Small Computers
  24. 24. Brand Customers cannot choose what they do not know. Preference is created through a critical mixture of brand meaning (importance) and awareness. Awareness Share Of Market=
  25. 25. Lipton Tetley 0.0 22.5 45.0 67.5 90.0 Market Share Aided Awareness US Tea Market
  26. 26. “You can build a brand even if you don’t advertise”
  27. 27. All evidence is to the contrary. Brand meaning is a definition maintained by the customer. Without speaking that meaning we allow the customer to define the brand. What we end up with is not one brand but 300,000 brands. What about Starbucks and Krispy Kreme?
  28. 28. . ! Both of these brands totally control a retail brand environment in which the brand is meticulously managed to create a single unified meaning. ! The Starbucks brand (A timely experience) has been translated from the retail store to the home and not the other way around.
  29. 29. The business of your business and the business of your brand Corporate identity Efficacy Consistency Product/Service What you sell W hat you do or what you m ake The business of your business Your Business i.e. FedEx
  30. 30. Corporate identity Efficacy Consistency Product/Service What you sell W hat you do or what you m ake The business of your business Your Business Affirmation Personal Identity Preceptual context Self-description W ho you are, what you m ean Corporate identity What customers buyThe business of your brand The business of your business and the business of your brand =Peace of mind
  31. 31. Customer
  32. 32. Brand Is Anthropology • Marketing is what you sell • Brand is the person you influence
  33. 33. Brand permission
  34. 34. How We choose
  35. 35. • Brand choices are a direct consequence of strongly held beliefs • Robust brands are a well polished reflection of those beliefs I choose brands that are a reflection of who I am
  36. 36. How beliefs influence the laundry soap purchase decisions Use bleach Use liquid Use powder Use additives Use softener Use pre-soak I need fresher smell I want softer clothes I need brighter colors I believe it is my job I need whiter whites I believe it is how I show I care I believe others can tell I believe simplicity is better Processes Purposes Precepts Ruling Precept
  37. 37. Core Customer World View The representation of the core customer (and those that the core customer identifies intimately with, like one's immediate family, or one's company or department, if one is a leader of an organization or a team). The core customer is perpetually drawn toward one’s deepest aspiration and motivations. The highest good that one imagines to be reasonably possible for oneself. The aspirational target. The Target is the goal, the ultimate destination, the target that is perpetually driving the Core Customer toward the Target. Aspirational Target World View is what frames and surrounds the individual's vision of target. One's world view is a kind of strategy map for navigating toward one’s target. Like target, world view is also shaped by one's cultural programming. However, it is more varied and complex than the target, because it is also guided by one's direct experiences and one's learnings via education and the media.
  38. 38. Core Customer World View The representation of the core customer (and those that the core customer identifies intimately with, like one's immediate family, or one's company or department, if one is a leader of an organization or a team). The core customer is perpetually drawn toward one’s deepest aspiration and motivations. The highest good that one imagines to be reasonably possible for oneself. The aspirational target. The Target is the goal, the ultimate destination, the target that is perpetually driving the Core Customer toward the Target. Aspirational Target World View is what frames and surrounds the individual's vision of target. One's world view is a kind of strategy map for navigating toward one’s target. Like target, world view is also shaped by one's cultural programming. However, it is more varied and complex than the target, because it is also guided by one's direct experiences and one's learnings via education and the media. "I (Core Customer) choose brands that share my world view and are most likely to advance me toward my aspirational target."
  39. 39. Core Customer Processes Purposes World View Precept The representation of the core customer (and those that the core customer identifies intimately with, like one's immediate family, or one's company or department, if one is a leader of an organization or a team). The core customer is perpetually drawn toward one’s deepest aspiration and motivations. The highest good that one imagines to be reasonably possible for oneself. The aspirational target. The Target is the goal, the ultimate destination, the target that is perpetually driving the Core Customer toward the Target. Aspirational Target World View is what frames and surrounds the individual's vision of target. One's world view is a kind of strategy map for navigating toward one’s target. Like target, world view is also shaped by one's cultural programming. However, it is more varied and complex than the target, because it is also guided by one's direct experiences and one's learnings via education and the media. The actions we want the customer to take and the act of buying the products we wish them to buy The NEEDS and WANTS that propel our customers to our processes. A vacuum-like void that seeks to be filled What our customer believes to be true about the world. Precepts create the Purposes that drive our Processes. Precepts arise out of the Target and World View
  40. 40. Brands are built around precepts • Marketing arguments are built around purposes • Brand gives your marketing strategy permission to be important
  41. 41. ® B E Y O N D T H E O R Y www.stealingshare.com ! Stealing Share, Inc Suite 816, 301 S Elm Street, Greensboro, NC 27401 • 336.389.9315 733 3rd Avenue, 15th Floor • New York, NY 10017 • 866-725-1080

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