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The Use of Comics in Medical Research
Using comics to explain randomization and
other complex concepts to research subject...
“Infants treated to a target of 85% to 89% had a
lower risk of retinopathy of prematurity but a
greater risk of mortality ...
We don’t know
which
treatment is
better…How do
you feel about
randomization?
3
1 2
3
4
4
5
How do we explain randomization?
6
“In medical research, randomization is the gold
standard for making comparisons. It means a patient
is assigned a medica...
7
8
9
Alex Thomas, MD
Gary Ashwal, MA
Booster Shot Media produces creative health information for
medical audiences. We use comi...
Thank you!
11
Alex Thomas, MD
alex@boostershotcomics.com
BoosterShotComics.com
Facebook.com/boostershotcomics
Twitter.com/...
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Comics in Medical Research - Comics & Medicine 2014

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The Use of Comics in Medical Research: Using comics to explain randomization and other complex concepts to research subjects.

Presented at the Comics & Medicine 2014 conference at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
Authors: Alex Thomas, MD and Gary Ashwal, MA from Booster Shot Comics; and Benjamin S. Wilfond, MD and Ellen Kuwana, MS from the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics at Seattle Children's.

This project was supported by the National Center For Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number 5UL1TR000423-07. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIH.

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Comics in Medical Research - Comics & Medicine 2014

  1. 1. The Use of Comics in Medical Research Using comics to explain randomization and other complex concepts to research subjects Presented by Alex Thomas, MD and Gary Ashwal Comics & Medicine 2014 Conference - Johns Hopkins University1
  2. 2. “Infants treated to a target of 85% to 89% had a lower risk of retinopathy of prematurity but a greater risk of mortality compared with those treated to a target of 91% to 95%.” 2 “SUPPORT” Trial (Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial) http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00233324 http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe1304996 http://www.medpagetoday.com/PublicHealthPolicy/ClinicalTrials/39682
  3. 3. We don’t know which treatment is better…How do you feel about randomization? 3
  4. 4. 1 2 3 4 4
  5. 5. 5 How do we explain randomization?
  6. 6. 6 “In medical research, randomization is the gold standard for making comparisons. It means a patient is assigned a medication by chance. Some will get medication A. Some will get B. Some will get C.” “So, how does this work with patients? Robert and the doctors randomly assign one of the medications to each patient. “ “Then he can track the groups of patients to see which group does better.”
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  10. 10. Alex Thomas, MD Gary Ashwal, MA Booster Shot Media produces creative health information for medical audiences. We use comics, animation, video, and other visual arts that are memorable to patients, providers, and the public. Benjamin S. Wilfond, MD Ellen Kuwana, MS The Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics conducts groundbreaking research on ethical issues related to pediatric healthcare and clinical research. This project was supported by the National Center For Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number 5UL1TR000423-07. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIH. 10
  11. 11. Thank you! 11 Alex Thomas, MD alex@boostershotcomics.com BoosterShotComics.com Facebook.com/boostershotcomics Twitter.com/boostershotcmx Gary Ashwal gary@boostershotcomics.com

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