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Managing Projects

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Today we are often expected to simultaneously work on multiple tasks independently and as a member of a team. This requires project management skills that are often not taught in a classroom. This session unpacks the bare bones of project management that support the planning, implementation, and conclusion of projects regardless of its size, discipline, or importance.

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Managing Projects

  1. 1. Managing Projects Bonner Congress 2018 Stetson University
  2. 2. Managing Projects 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring 20% 50% 50% 30% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 30%30% 20% 10% 20% 30% 50%50% 60% 80% 20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20% Education & Reflection Direct Client Service Service Leadership Capacity-Building / Social Action Senior Presentation of Learning Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring EXPLORING IDENTITY AND PLACE MOVING FROM SERVICE TO SOLUTIONS LEADING
 GROUPS KNOWING
 YOUR ISSUE MANAGING PROJECTS BUILDING CAPACITY AND ORGANIZAT IONS PREPARING FOR CIVICALLY ENGAGED LIVES LEAVING A LEGACY First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year
  3. 3. How it Works: Perception What is supposed to happen… ☺
  4. 4. Work-a-rounds … Rework … Inspection … Delays … ☺ How it Works: Reality What really happens....
  5. 5. Planning: Why Bother? Things go wrong - plans fail. Nothing turns out as we expect. Fate makes sport of our best intentions. If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans. No-Man’s Land, Scott Huler Preparing ≠ Planning
  6. 6. The Project Manager’s Knowledge Areas Procurement Risk Communication Resources Schedule Cost Quality Stakeholders Scope Integration
  7. 7. Managing Projects: 9 Steps 1 2 3 4 5 6 987 Project Charter (Why?) Stakeholders (Who?) Requirements (What?) Work Breakdown Structure (How?) Risk & Issues (What if?) Schedule & Budget (How long & much?) Execution Monitoring & Controlling Closing
  8. 8. Executing Were are the Deliverables? 9 Questions Controlling Are we there yet? Closing How did we do? Planning Initiating Why? When & How Much? What if? How? What? Who? ↻ ↻
  9. 9. 9 Questions Executing Project Deliverables Controlling Project Reports Closing Lessons Learned Planning Project Plan Initiating Project Charter Develop Schedule & Budget Analyze Risks Create WBS Analyze Requirements Analyze Stakeholders ↻ ↻ Executing Were are the Deliverables? Controlling Are we there yet? Closing How did we do? Planning Initiating Why? When & How Much? What if? How? What? Who? ➔ 9 Steps
  10. 10. Executing Project Deliverables Step 1: Initiating Controlling Project Reports Closing Lessons Learned Planning Project Plan Initiating Project Charter Develop Schedule & Budget Analyze Risks Create WBS Analyze Requirements Analyze Stakeholders ↻ ↻
  11. 11. Step 1: The Project Goal Project Charter 1. WHO is paying for this Project? 2. HOW will they get the investment back? 3. WHEN will they get the investment back? Team Charter 1. Is the goal CLEAR to each team member? 2. Is the team CAPABLE of achieving the goal? 3. Is COMPENSATION fair for each team member?
  12. 12. Project Charter: Contents Major charter components include: • Project purpose • Measurable project objectives • Success criteria • Project justification • Project manager’s authority Adapted from PMBOK® Guide
  13. 13. Our Project Goal •Project: Citizen Action Project- Biking and Pedestrian Pathways •Goal: Phase I (Feasibility Study) — Identify the monetary resources and public/private interest for implementing the bike and pedestrian pathways in Athens town, Concord's campus, along with other Mercer County areas.
  14. 14. Our Project Goal Project Charter 1. WHO is paying for our Project? 2. HOW will they get the investment back? 3. WHEN will they get the investment back? Team Charter 1. Is the goal CLEAR to each team member? 2. Is the team CAPABLE of achieving the goal? 3. Is COMPENSATION fair for each team member?
  15. 15. Executing Project Deliverables Step 2: Analyze Stakeholders Controlling Project Reports Closing Lessons Learned Planning Project Plan Initiating Project Charter Develop Schedule & Budget Analyze Risks Create WBS Analyze Requirements Analyze Stakeholders ↻ ↻
  16. 16. Step 2: Analyze Stakeholders A Stakeholder is anyone who is: •Impacted by activities or results of a project •Interested in the project progress, output or outcome. •In a position to Influence (power), support or resist the outcome Failure to address stakeholder issues often leads to project “failure”!
  17. 17. Our Stakeholders • Service Learning Faculty: teaches or encourages students to combine learning goals and community service in ways that can enhance both student growth and strengthen the community. • College Students: students who might support the project. • Residents: anyone that resides in the town/area. • Local Businesses: a company providing goods or services in the town/area. • Local Government: any administrator/department that works in public office and representatives elected by those who live in the town/area. • Donors: public or private funders that could donate to the project.
  18. 18. Stakeholder Analysis Service Learning Faculty Local Government Donors Residents College Students Local Businesses
  19. 19. Executing Project Deliverables Step 3: Analyze Requirements Controlling Project Reports Closing Lessons Learned Planning Project Plan Initiating Project Charter Develop Schedule & Budget Analyze Risks Create WBS Analyze Requirements Analyze Stakeholders ↻ ↻
  20. 20. Step 3: Analyze Requirements Business Outcomes Functional
 “Product” Requirements Procedures “Project”
 Scope 
 Statement Client Driven Project Team Driven Seen Unseen Two Types of Project Scope Expectations Desires Hopes Needs Wants Likes Process Services Products Project Deliverables
  21. 21. Our Stakeholder Requirements • Lights on the trail: to encourage evening use • Bike Sharing: program to have trail users share bikes. • Grant proposal: proposal that shows budgetary requirements and requests monetary assistance in the form of a grant for the project. • Input (voice be heard): avenues for those residing in the area to share their thoughts on the proposed project. • Citizen endorsement (vote or petition): any form or indication of choice by residents to approve the project. • Pitstop: Restrooms and water fountains
  22. 22. Our Stakeholder Requirements • Sponsorship opportunity: working together with public or private organizations to conduct and share the positive( financial) outcomes of the project. • Economic impact: an analysis that examines the effect of the project on the economy in the town/area. It usually measures changes in business revenue, business profits, personal wages, and/or jobs. • Cost effective plan:  a form of economic analysis that compares the relative costs and outcomes of the project. • Recognition (Rewards): faculty being distinguished for service learning initiatives. • Credit/Stipend: any academic or financial acknowledgement for students as part of their involvement with the project.
  23. 23. Characteristics of Project Objectives S M A R T Specific: Explicit, clear, understandable (e.g., written from a business perspective) Measurable: Quantifiable (e.g., typically making reference to business metrics, quantity, quality, cost, or time) Attainable: Reachable, within capabilities Realistic: Relevant, right approach Time-bound: Specific time period
  24. 24. Prioritizing Project Requirements MoSCoW Must: Necessary to achieve the project objective(s) Should: Strongly desirable for project output and outcome. Could: A ‘Nice to Have’ if time and cost permit Won’t: An outright ‘No’
  25. 25. Requirements Analysis Lights Pitstop Bike Sharing Engage Students Faculty Recognition & Rewards Sponsorship opportunity Resident Input Citizen endorsement Cost Effective Plan Student Credit or Stipend Grant proposal Economic impact
  26. 26. Executing Project Deliverables Step 4: Work Breakdown Structure Controlling Project Reports Closing Lessons Learned Planning Project Plan Initiating Project Charter Develop Schedule & Budget Analyze Risks Create WBS Analyze Requirements Analyze Stakeholders ↻ ↻
  27. 27. Step 4: Work Breakdown Structure …a deliverable-oriented, hierarchical decomposition of the work… NounVerb + Work Packet
  28. 28. Our Work Requirements 1) Study Economic impact 2) Create GIS map 3) Conduct Petition 4) Survey Citizens 5) Hold Public forum(s) 6) Research faculty recognitions 7) Analyze grants guidelines 8) Identify funding sources 9) Analyze Bike Sharing cost 10) Survey Local Businesses 11) Develop Student recruiting plan 12) Study Pathway Cost Options 13) Write Work-study job description 14) Find Funding for CBR research
  29. 29. Our Work Breakdown Structure Create GIS Map Study Economic impact Conduct Petition Hold Public forum(s) Research faculty recognitions Analyze grants guidelines Identify funding sources Analyze Bike sharing cost Survey Local businesses Develop Student recruiting plan Study Pathway cost options Write Work- study job description Find Funds for CBR research
  30. 30. Executing Project Deliverables Step 5: Analyze & Manage Risks Controlling Project Reports Closing Lessons Learned Planning Project Plan Initiating Project Charter Develop Schedule & Budget Analyze Risks Create WBS Analyze Requirements Analyze Stakeholders ↻ ↻
  31. 31. Predictions Environmental Change AssumptionsComplexity Tools Methods Why is there Uncertainty? We can’t fully predict the future Risk
  32. 32. Step 5: Analyze & Manage Risks Probability ImpactX
  33. 33. Our Project Risks • Citizen surveys not feasible (due to cost) • Low business interest • Low citizen interest • No Federal Work Study funding • No pathway funding • No private foundations funding • No reasonable route • No relevant CBR courses/faculty • No zoning approval
  34. 34. Our Work Requirements 1) Study Economic impact 2) Create GIS map 3) Conduct Petition 4) Survey Citizens 5) Hold Public forum(s) 6) Research faculty recognitions 7) Analyze grants guidelines 8) Identify funding sources 9) Analyze Bike Sharing cost 10) Survey Local Businesses 11) Develop Student recruiting plan 12) Study Pathway Cost Options 13) Write Work-study job description 14) Find Funding for CBR research
  35. 35. Our Risk AnalysisProbability Impact on Objectives Low High MediumHigh High/High Medium/High High/Medium Low Medium No reasonable route No relevant CBR course No Work- Study funding No private funding Low business interest Low citizen turnout No zoning approval No pathway funding Citizen surveys not feasible
  36. 36. Scorecard Max Score Your Score Project Management Quiz 10 9 Step Cards in Order 9 Stakeholder Analysis 6 Requirements Analysis 13 Risk Analysis 9 TOTAL 47
  37. 37. Executing Project Deliverables Step 6: Schedule & Budget Controlling Project Reports Closing Lessons Learned Planning Project Plan Initiating Project Charter Develop Schedule & Budget Analyze Risks Create WBS Analyze Requirements Analyze Stakeholders ↻ ↻
  38. 38. Step 6: Schedule & Budget
  39. 39. Executing Project Deliverables Step 7: Executing the Project Controlling Project Reports Closing Lessons Learned Planning Project Plan Initiating Project Charter Develop Schedule & Budget Analyze Risks Create WBS Analyze Requirements Analyze Stakeholders ↻ ↻
  40. 40. High/HighHigh/Medium Step 7: Executing the Project
  41. 41. High/HighHigh/Medium Step 7: Executing the Project
  42. 42. High/HighHigh/Medium Step 7: Executing the Project
  43. 43. Executing Project Deliverables Step 8: Controlling the Project Controlling Project Reports Closing Lessons Learned Planning Project Plan Initiating Project Charter Develop Schedule & Budget Analyze Risks Create WBS Analyze Requirements Analyze Stakeholders ↻ ↻
  44. 44. High/HighHigh/Medium Step 8: Controlling the Project
  45. 45. Executing Project Deliverables Step 9: Closing the Project Controlling Project Reports Closing Lessons Learned Planning Project Plan Initiating Project Charter Develop Schedule & Budget Analyze Risks Create WBS Analyze Requirements Analyze Stakeholders ↻ ↻
  46. 46. High/HighHigh/Medium What did we do well? What did we do poorly? What did we learn? Step 9: Closing the Project

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