Marketing 2.0
Models, Tools and Processes

Bob Sullebarger
rfsully@gmail.com / @bsullebarger / 978-500-1635
Brand
Brand according to Me
•

Brand Strategy flows from, and supports Business Strategy

•

“Brand" is the full experience and ...
B2B Brand Strategy
•

•

Define the desired Brand
attributes
Focus the Brand
definition on
– business value, not
features
...
Brand
Ricardo Guimares, Thymus Branding
São Paulo, Brazil

“Your brand is what your customers say it is.”
“The value of a ...
6
Source: The Blake Project
B2B Technology Brand Components
Value Prop
(Promises)

Business Buyer

Credibility
(Proof Points)

Business Value: The dec...
NPS

8
It all comes down to this:
Successful Businesses Rest on the Golden Rule
• In business as in life, you must treat others
(...
Fred Reichheld
Fellow, Bain & Co.
Father of NPS (Net Promoter Score)
The Ultimate Question is this:

“On a scale of 1 to 1...
Good Profits or Bad Profits?
•

Bad Profits
–
–
–
–
–

•

Good Profits
–
–

•

Profits earned at the expense of customer r...
Why NPS matters
• In a socially connected world, there is no
substitute for positive word of mouth
– Detractors are far mo...
Business Planning

13
Geoffrey Moore Positioning Statement
• For (target customers)
Who (have the following problem)
Our product is a (describe ...
Business Model Generation
• what are you offering them? what is that
• getting done for them? do they care?
• which activi...
Don Thorston’s “Whole Product” Concept
The solution must solve the customer’s whole problem, not be
an interchangeable a p...
Product Strategy & Management
•

Managing Existing Products
–
–
–
–

•

“Simple” Wins. Investing in Ease of Use tends to b...
High Tech Differentiation
Differentiation Strategy

Description

Unique Features

• Most commonly used; an ”easy” strategy...
First to Market, or Fast Follower?
First to Market

Fast Follower

• Market share advantage
• Earlier market & customer
ex...
Product Management

20
Pragmatic Marketing Framework
Product Marketing

Inbound/Outbound
Marketing

Product Management

21
Product Portfolio Management:
Where to Invest
• Program States
State
Invest
Sustain
Sunset

Revenue
Future Growth
Current
...
Evaluating Product Opportunities
• Checklist for making the “Go / No Go Decision”: Do we need an
Offering in this (new) sp...
Product Management Software Tools

24
Customer Acquisition Process

25
Marketing Process

26
Components of Lead Gen and Management

27
Building a Sales & Marketing Machine
David Skok
Matrix Partners

28
Diagram the Buying Process
David Skok

Example:
Tech Champion
Buying Process

Matrix Partners

29
Tech Champion Buying
Process with Company Steps

30
Metrics
• Funnel Behavior
– Conversion Rates: between deal stage
– Close Rate
– Duration of deals in each stage

• Win/Los...
The Social Web

32
The Emerging Social Enterprise

•

•
•
•
•
•
•
•

The existence of relationships between people that drive mutual benefit ...
David Meerman Scott
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Marketing is more than Advertising
PR is for more than just a mainstream me...
Personas
• Developing an understanding
of the personal motivations
and professional goals of all
those who influence decis...
Inbound Marketing
• Search Engine Optimization &
Inbound Marketing
–
–
–
–
–

Blog Platform
Social Media Integration
Conte...
Linking Social Media to Business
Objectives

37
Social Media Strategy
Clear Objectives are Key to Successful Social Media
Strategy
Charlene Li
Josh Bernoff
Forrester Rese...
The Social Technographics Ladder

Social Media
users tend to
follow these
behavior
profiles

39
Forrester Social Technographics Tool
http://www.forrester.com/empowered/tool_b2b.html

40
Listening: Surveys

• They can answer any question you can think up
• But they can’t tell you what you never thought to as...
Roles and their Groundswell
Objectives

42
Criteria for selecting new social
technologies
1. Does it enable people to connect with each other in
new ways?
2. Is it e...
Participation in Social Web Activities
(at least monthly)
Watch video from another user
Read online forums
Visit social ne...
Blogging Program
• Pre-requisite: Writers have to want to engage in dialogue. You need drive.
• Know who you want to reach...
Social Media Management Systems
Enable social media teams to manage multiple accounts and
workflow across cross-functional...
Social CRM
•
•
•

Allows teams to organize customer data into one repository across the enterprise
It’s more than just add...
Listening Strategies
•

Objectives
–
–
–
–
–
–

Find out what your brand stands for as perceived from the outside
Understa...
The Social Web, Step1: Talking
Brian Haven, former Forrester Analyst
“The funnel has outlived its usefulness as a metaphor...
Step 2: Energizing
Trust in Sources of Information

50
Step 3: Energizing Passionate Advocates
•
•
•

The most honest form of marketing is word of mouth from
rabid fans
Can’t be...
Step 4: Embracing
• Embracing means making customers an integral part of the way
you innovate, with both products/services...
The Lean Start-Up Model

53
Lean Start-Up Model
Lean Start-Up Model
•
•

•

Steven Gary Blank: “The Four Steps to the Epiphany”
Eric Ries: “Lessons Le...
The Customer Development Process
Customer
Customer
Discovery
Discovery

Customer
Validation

Customer
Creation

Company
Bu...
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Marketing 2.0 Toolkit

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Here's my collection of Marketing & Product Management best practices, appropriate to B2B tech companies. Would love to hear from comments and suggested improvements and additions!

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Marketing 2.0 Toolkit

  1. 1. Marketing 2.0 Models, Tools and Processes Bob Sullebarger rfsully@gmail.com / @bsullebarger / 978-500-1635
  2. 2. Brand
  3. 3. Brand according to Me • Brand Strategy flows from, and supports Business Strategy • “Brand" is the full experience and the associations that result from interactions of all kinds with our company. • Brand Management is not limited to the logo and look and feel of collateral. • It is communicated in every touch point any given person has with us, regardless of whether he is a prospect, a customer, an analyst, blogger, competitor, vendor, investor or even a casual observer. It encompasses management of communication and full brand experience processes across the full customer journey / lifecycle (awareness, prospect, customer, upsell, upgrade, retirement). • The tone and manner in which the receptionist answers the phone, the visual appearance and helpfulness of our website, the focus of the support team on solving the problem for the customer rather than deflecting blame to competitors, the ease of use of our solutions, the professionalism of our sales staff, the logo and our collateral, our marketing programs and content, and our predictable and consistent delivery on our promises are all supportive of the brand. Consequently, everyone in the company participates in Marketing. 3
  4. 4. B2B Brand Strategy • • Define the desired Brand attributes Focus the Brand definition on – business value, not features – Identify an “emotional hook “ • • Pricing is set based on Brand Equity (the premium a customer will pay for your offering) Goal is to move your prospects from Brand Awareness to Brand Insistence http://www.marketingmo.com 4
  5. 5. Brand Ricardo Guimares, Thymus Branding São Paulo, Brazil “Your brand is what your customers say it is.” “The value of a brand belongs to the market, and not to the company. The company in this sense is a tool to create value to the brand…Brand in this sense lives outside the company, not in the company… Brand is an open structure” 5
  6. 6. 6 Source: The Blake Project
  7. 7. B2B Technology Brand Components Value Prop (Promises) Business Buyer Credibility (Proof Points) Business Value: The decision to deploy this product is justified and proven by metrics. (low professional risk.) Thought Leadership: The vendor is the (perceived) innovation leader. Technical Evaluator / User Job Effectiveness: This solution helps me do my job better. Momentum: The business is growing and accelerating. NPS/Customer Sat: Their customers are happy; proactively recommend. Value Delivered: The business and functional promises made were realized. 7
  8. 8. NPS 8
  9. 9. It all comes down to this: Successful Businesses Rest on the Golden Rule • In business as in life, you must treat others (customers, prospects, and colleagues) the way you wish to be treated. Strong, positive human relationships are essential. • There is nothing more powerful that the word of mouth effect spread by happy and passionate customers who will eagerly recommend your company to others. It is the source of all market momentum. • Well performing, customer-driven organizations are committed to elating their customers, so that they come back for more, and evangelize to others on your behalf. • Companies that do this well are able to scale back marketing costs, and become unbeatable in their markets. • This is what being “customer led” is all about. 9
  10. 10. Fred Reichheld Fellow, Bain & Co. Father of NPS (Net Promoter Score) The Ultimate Question is this: “On a scale of 1 to 10, how likely is it that you would recommend this company to a friend or colleague?” 10
  11. 11. Good Profits or Bad Profits? • Bad Profits – – – – – • Good Profits – – • Profits earned at the expense of customer relationships Whenever a customer feels misled, ignored, or coerced, then profits from that customer are “bad”. Bad profits arise when companies save money by delivering a lousy customer experience. Bad profits are often driven by the relentless focus of management on making the numbers in the short term, and the incentives they consequently drive into the organization. Bad Profits create a legion of “Detractors” who tell others not to do business with you, which is impossible to overcome. Profits earned with customers enthusiastic cooperation by delighting them so they willingly come back for more, and tell others Satisfied customers become strong “Promoters”. They are in effect part of your marketing organization. Net Promoter Score (NPS) works because (unlike other metrics) it is linked to both market share and profitability. – – It is therefore the only measure of customer satisfaction that matters. NPS needs to be a part of every executive’s bonus. It is a business-critical priority, and your most important metric. 11
  12. 12. Why NPS matters • In a socially connected world, there is no substitute for positive word of mouth – Detractors are far more vocal than Promoters • Without customers happily willing to support your brand, it is difficult to achieve rapid growth • NPS has to be a way of life. Make it part of your bonus and incentive structure. – Business Unit GMs at GE who have falling NPS for two consecutive quarters are fired. 12
  13. 13. Business Planning 13
  14. 14. Geoffrey Moore Positioning Statement • For (target customers) Who (have the following problem) Our product is a (describe the product or solution) That provides (cite the breakthrough capability) Unlike (reference competition), Our product/solution (describe the key point of competitive differentiation) • http://newsletter.beaupre.com/e_article000209887.cfm 14
  15. 15. Business Model Generation • what are you offering them? what is that • getting done for them? do they care? • which activities do you need to perform well in your business model? • what is crucial? key activities value proposition • what relationships are you establishing with each segment? • personal? automated? acquisitive? retentive? customer relationships key partners customer segments • which partners and suppliers leverage your model? • who do you need to rely on? • what is the resulting cost structure? • which key elements drive your costs? cost structure • which customers and users are you serving? • which jobs do they really want to get done? key resources • which resources underpin your business model? • which assets are essential? revenue streams channels • how does each customer segment want to be reached? • through which interaction points? • what are customers really willing to pay for? how? • are you generating transactional 15 or recurring revenues?
  16. 16. Don Thorston’s “Whole Product” Concept The solution must solve the customer’s whole problem, not be an interchangeable a piece of the solution The Rules: 1. Does It Solve A Problem? - Have you solved a problem the customer recognizes. Have you identified the customers pain. If not, you have a vitamin and not a pain killer. You want a pain killer. 2. Is It Easy To Understand? - Seriously, 5 words should do it. 2 words is better. Do the "mom test”: If mom doesn't understand it, change something until she does. 3. Is It Easy To Get? - Have you removed the barriers between you and having your customers use your product? In a 2.0 world we are talking free trials, no cost, fast, easy. Get it in their hands or nothing good will happen. 4. Is It Easy To Use? - At Apple the rule was, "1 minute after they start to use it , they feel like calling their friends”. " You will not believe what I just got". 5. Is It Easy To Share? - In this ultra-connected world, your customers are your marketing department. If your customers are not marketing your product, you have problems. We used to call it evangelism, now we call it sharing. Your product needs to have "embedded viral components" - active mechanisms built directly into the application that assume your customers will want to tell everyone they know. Make it easy for them to do so. Source: Don Thorston, Marketing 2.0 http://donthorson.typepad.com/don_thorson/2006/10/whole_product.html 16
  17. 17. Product Strategy & Management • Managing Existing Products – – – – • “Simple” Wins. Investing in Ease of Use tends to be your most powerful lever EOU is more appreciated by customers than new features (“The Excel Effect”) Focus on making your existing products simpler and more intuitive to install and use Get a User Experience (UX) specialist involved Finding New Growth Opportunities – Starts with intimacy with customers, and developing a deep understanding of their most pressing problems effecting their ability to get things done – The thought process should be independent of bias from your existing product set. Don’t approach it by first asking, “How can we extend what we already have to sell more of it?” • Make plans that are aligned with the broad trends of our time – The Cloud : Data and Applications are being drawn there; Internal IT is going away, evolving away from management of plumbing to management of data, applications – Mobile: The PC/Desktop as we’ve known it is going away – Analytics: Extracting business value and intelligence from data – Collaboration: The next source of competitiveness , internally and with customers – SaaS and Managed Services: There is little interest in deploying new enterprise software apps on prem 17
  18. 18. High Tech Differentiation Differentiation Strategy Description Unique Features • Most commonly used; an ”easy” strategy • Endlessly adding new features does not give sustained differentiation (”trench warfare”) • Can contradict ease of use Measurable Benefits • Reduced electricity bill • Longer recording time • Faster Internet access Ease of Use • A very important vector of differentiation • Sometimes technology advances do not deliver enhanced productivity, because of usability problems • A big challenge in an era when everything is integrated in a single device (mobile phone) Unique Fundamental Characteristics • • • • • Design • More and more important in maturing markets • Hardware Design & User Interface Design (Apple) Longer battery life Better quality More responsive UI Technology advances complemented with good usability Often a crucial factor in buyer’s decision making process 18
  19. 19. First to Market, or Fast Follower? First to Market Fast Follower • Market share advantage • Earlier market & customer experience • Influence on markets and standards • Possibility to build entry barriers • Image benefits, a glamorous strategy • Big risks! • Wait until market is clarified • Avoid market education costs • Nearer in time to eventual market, easier to predict • Ability to use newer technology • Fast means fast! • Advantages of being fast: Jump ahead and stay ahead • Managed risk Key Question: How confident are you that you have the market timing right? 19
  20. 20. Product Management 20
  21. 21. Pragmatic Marketing Framework Product Marketing Inbound/Outbound Marketing Product Management 21
  22. 22. Product Portfolio Management: Where to Invest • Program States State Invest Sustain Sunset Revenue Future Growth Current Decline Resources Heavy Moderate Light or Zero Objective Strategic Make the numbers EOL • Resource Maps: invest in growth Resource Map Product/Program Product A Product B Product C Product D Product E Product F Product G Posture Invest Sustain Sunset Invest Sustain Sunset Invest 2011 100 4,800 2,500 100 2,800 1,500 11,800 Bookings 2012 2013 1,000 2,000 5,100 4,800 2,250 2,000 1,000 2,500 3,100 3,200 1,200 900 1,000 2,500 13,650 15,400 2014 3,000 4,800 1,750 5,000 3,000 600 5,000 18,150 3-Yr CAGR 67% -2% -7% 133% -1% -17% 133% 11% Resources 25 8 2 25 7 2 12 81 $/Head 240 1,238 2,125 140 900 1,050 292 359 22
  23. 23. Evaluating Product Opportunities • Checklist for making the “Go / No Go Decision”: Do we need an Offering in this (new) space?       Market Opportunity (e.g. size, growth)? Unresolved problems that the product will address? Is the problem urgent and pervasive? Are there buyers who are willing to pay to have them resolved ? Does the product fit the strengths and competencies of the organization? Does this product provide the organization with a sustainable competitive advantage? • Then decide HOW to address it: the BUY/BUILD/PARTNER Decision BUY BUILD PARTNER Time to Market Need Urgent Moderate N/A Expertise Weak Strong None Strategic Value High High Low 23
  24. 24. Product Management Software Tools 24
  25. 25. Customer Acquisition Process 25
  26. 26. Marketing Process 26
  27. 27. Components of Lead Gen and Management 27
  28. 28. Building a Sales & Marketing Machine David Skok Matrix Partners 28
  29. 29. Diagram the Buying Process David Skok Example: Tech Champion Buying Process Matrix Partners 29
  30. 30. Tech Champion Buying Process with Company Steps 30
  31. 31. Metrics • Funnel Behavior – Conversion Rates: between deal stage – Close Rate – Duration of deals in each stage • Win/Loss Ratio • ACV: Annual Contract Value – by segment, vs time • Margin • CAC: Customer Acquisition Cost • LTV: Lifetime Value 31
  32. 32. The Social Web 32
  33. 33. The Emerging Social Enterprise • • • • • • • • The existence of relationships between people that drive mutual benefit are what defines “a society” The Social Web is enabling human relationships and the ways we communicate It is set to turbo-charge productivity and innovation through ubiquitous and effective collaboration. It is the next major driver of competitiveness. Enterprises will become increasingly transparent Customers Relationships become personal and intimate Those who nurture and develop the deepest, most intimate relationships will win Those who collaborate well will get a big velocity advantage Everyone will participate 33
  34. 34. David Meerman Scott • • • • • • • • • • • • • Marketing is more than Advertising PR is for more than just a mainstream media audience You are what you publish People want authenticity, not spin People want participation, not propaganda Instead of causing one-way interruption, marketing is about delivering content at just the precise moment your audience needs it Marketers must shift their thinking from mainstream marketing to the masses to a strategy of reaching vast numbers of underserved audiences via the web PR is not about your boss seeing your company on TV. It’s about your buyers seeing your company on the web. Marketing is not about your agency winning awards. It’s about your organization winning business. The Internet has made public relations public again, after years of almost exclusive focus on media. Companies must drive people into the purchase process with great online content. Blogs, online video, e-books, news releases, and other forms of online content let organizations communicate directly with buyers in a form they appreciate. On the web, the lines between marketing and PR have blurred. 34
  35. 35. Personas • Developing an understanding of the personal motivations and professional goals of all those who influence decisions about your solution is key to understanding how to best communicate with them in a way that (a) is welcome, and (b) has impact. • “Know the goals, and let content drive the action.” 35
  36. 36. Inbound Marketing • Search Engine Optimization & Inbound Marketing – – – – – Blog Platform Social Media Integration Content Management SEO Tools Email Manager • Lead Nurturing • Newsletter & Media Room – Content Curation – Thought Leadership 36
  37. 37. Linking Social Media to Business Objectives 37
  38. 38. Social Media Strategy Clear Objectives are Key to Successful Social Media Strategy Charlene Li Josh Bernoff Forrester Research 38
  39. 39. The Social Technographics Ladder Social Media users tend to follow these behavior profiles 39
  40. 40. Forrester Social Technographics Tool http://www.forrester.com/empowered/tool_b2b.html 40
  41. 41. Listening: Surveys • They can answer any question you can think up • But they can’t tell you what you never thought to ask • What you never thought to ask might be the most important question for your business • You only hear from people willing to respond; You can’t assume the results are truly representative 41
  42. 42. Roles and their Groundswell Objectives 42
  43. 43. Criteria for selecting new social technologies 1. Does it enable people to connect with each other in new ways? 2. Is it effortless to sign up for? 3. Does it shift power from institutions to people? 4. Does the community generate enough content to sustain itself? 5. Is it an open platform that invites partnerships? 43
  44. 44. Participation in Social Web Activities (at least monthly) Watch video from another user Read online forums Visit social networking sites Read customer ratings/reviews Read blogs Update/maintain a profile on a social networking site Add comments to someone's page on a social networking site Contribute to online forums Listen to or download audio Comment on someone else's blog Upload photos to a public website Post ratings/reviews Post/update/maintain a blog Listen to podcasts Use a desktop widget Upload video Use RSS Upload audio you produced Tag webpages, photos Contribute to a wiki Use Twitter 29% 28% 25% 25% 25% 20% 18% 18% 18% 14% 13% 11% 11% 11% 10% 8% 8% 8% 7% 6% 5% 44
  45. 45. Blogging Program • Pre-requisite: Writers have to want to engage in dialogue. You need drive. • Know who you want to reach and what you want to accomplish 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Start by listening Identify the goal for the blog Estimate ROI Develop a plan: One blog or many? Rehearse: Write 5-10 posts before going live Develop an Editorial Process: For Planning & Review of Content Design the Blog and it’s connection to your site Marketing plan: to help people find the blog Authenticity: Be honest, even when things go wrong Write in first person; be helpful, not partisan 45
  46. 46. Social Media Management Systems Enable social media teams to manage multiple accounts and workflow across cross-functional teams 46
  47. 47. Social CRM • • • Allows teams to organize customer data into one repository across the enterprise It’s more than just adding fields to an existing database. SCRM requires corporations to connect APIs from brand monitoring and customer databases, like e-mail marketing and CRM systems Apparent Leaders Start-Ups Incumbents 47
  48. 48. Listening Strategies • Objectives – – – – – – Find out what your brand stands for as perceived from the outside Understand how buzz is shifting Save research money Find sources of influence Manage PR crises Generate new product and marketing ideas • Private communities • Brand Monitoring & Analytics 48
  49. 49. The Social Web, Step1: Talking Brian Haven, former Forrester Analyst “The funnel has outlived its usefulness as a metaphor. Face it: Marketers no longer dictate the path people take, nor do they lead the dialogue.” Once people are aware of you product, a new dynamic kicks in: people learning from each other Good methods for Talking to the Social Web 1. 2. 3. 4. Post a viral video: Great for punching through the noise • Tap an emotional thread based on Personas Engage in social networks and user-generate content sites • Best solution for word of mouth problems Join the blogosphere • Good fit for complex solutions, technologies Create a community • When customers insist on depending on each other, not you 49
  50. 50. Step 2: Energizing Trust in Sources of Information 50
  51. 51. Step 3: Energizing Passionate Advocates • • • The most honest form of marketing is word of mouth from rabid fans Can’t be faked, but can be encouraged Techniques: – Tap into enthusiasm with Ratings & Reviews: Works best in retail and others with direct customer contact – Create a community: For customers who are truly passionate • ConstantContact “ConnectUp” gets 10% customer participation. 30% generate referrals for $60 credit: Customer LTV is $1,500 • High failure rate overall – Participate in and energize online communities of your brand enthusiasts • Consider propensities of the customer base first. Design strategies that match existing relationships, an provide ways for customers to extend those relationships. 51
  52. 52. Step 4: Embracing • Embracing means making customers an integral part of the way you innovate, with both products/services and process improvements • Borders of the Enterprise become porous • Passionate fans and SME’s get directly involved • A “customer advisory board on steroids” • Leading Authors Eric von Hippel MIT Democratizing Innovation link Patricia B. Seybold Patricia Seybold Group Outside Innovation link Don Tapscott & Anthony Williams Moxie Insight / New Paradigm Wikinomics link 52
  53. 53. The Lean Start-Up Model 53
  54. 54. Lean Start-Up Model Lean Start-Up Model • • • Steven Gary Blank: “The Four Steps to the Epiphany” Eric Ries: “Lessons Learned: The Lean Start-Up” – www.startuplessonslearned.com; HBS EIR Marty Cagan: “Inspired: How to create products customers love” The (broken) Product Development Model (An “all in” bet on nailing the plan up front) Concept /Seed Product Development Alpha/Beta Test Launch & FCS Pray you got it right Customer Development Model (Build concept, test, validate before scaling the company) Customer Customer Discovery Discovery Customer Validation Customer Creation Company Building 54
  55. 55. The Customer Development Process Customer Customer Discovery Discovery Customer Validation Customer Creation Company Building Customer Development Product Development Scale the Company • Customer Discovery – • Customer Validation – – • Build a repeatable, field-tested sales roadmap for the sales/mktg team to follow later Prove the model by taking money from customers (confirm the “willingness to pay”) Customer Creation – • Find out who the customers for your offering really are; Whether the problem you believe you are solving is important to them; No guesswork, “get out of the building”; Confirm there are customers and a market for the vision. Create end user demand and drive it into the sales channels Company Building – Transition out of informal, learning, discovery-oriented mode, to formal departments with VPs of Sales, Marketing and BusDev. 55

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