Online learning research and possibilities

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Online learning research and possibilities

  1. 1. Moodle and Online Learning<br />Research and Possibilities<br />
  2. 2. <ul><li>“K–12 Online Learning: A 2008 FOLLOW-UP OF THE SURVEY OF U.S. SCHOOL DISTRICT ADMINISTRATORS”
  3. 3. Highlights:</li></ul>1. 66% of school districts with students enrolled in online or blended courses anticipate their online enrollments will grow.<br />2. The overall number of K-12 students engaged in online courses in 2007-2008, is estimated at 1,030,000. This represents a 47% increase since 2005-2006.<br />Research: Number of Users<br />
  4. 4. Highlights (continued)<br />3. Respondents report that online learning is meeting the specific needs of a range of students, from those who need extra help and credit recovery to those who want to take Advanced Placement and college-level courses.<br />4. Perhaps the voices heard most clearly in this survey were those of respondents representing small rural school districts. For them, the availability of online learning is a lifeline and enables them to provide students with course choices and in some cases, the basic courses that should be part of every curriculum. <br />http://www.sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/k-12online2008<br />
  5. 5. <ul><li>Some studies show that online and/or blended learning can be just as effecive as face-to-face.
  6. 6. Sloan-C (A Consortium of Institutions and Organizations Committed to Quality Online Education). Comparing Student Performance: Online Versus Blended Versus Face-to-Face. This research demonstrates that there is no significant difference among delivery modes. Additionally, blended and online modes for this class do very well when measuring student satisfaction, learning effectiveness and faculty satisfaction. http://www.aln.org/node/1578
  7. 7. Douglas D. Roscoe. University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Completed a study of student outcomes in a pair of matched courses, one taught in a blended format and one taught in a traditional format. The data suggest that the students in the blended section did just as well as those in the face-to-face section. http://www.allacademic.com//meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/2/7/8/4/1/pages278414/p278414-1.php
  8. 8. Karen Swan. Kent State University. Learning Effectiveness Online: What the Research Tells Us. Lists several studies done with same results. http://www.kent.edu/rcet/Publications/upload/learning%20effectiveness4.pdf</li></ul>Research: Effectiveness<br />
  9. 9. <ul><li>Depends on a number of factors:
  10. 10. Level of student self-motivation
  11. 11. Types of activities encountered
  12. 12. Interaction with content
  13. 13. Interaction with instructor
  14. 14. Interaction with peers
  15. 15. Personalization</li></ul>Karen Swan. Kent State University. Learning Effectiveness Online: What the Research Tells Us. http://www.kent.edu/rcet/Publications/upload/learning%20effectiveness4.pdf<br />Effectiveness<br />
  16. 16. <ul><li>Blended learning, combining the best elements of online and face-to-face education, is likely to emerge as the predominant teaching model of the future.
  17. 17. In general terms, blended learning combines online delivery of educational content with the best features of classroom interaction and live instruction to personalize learning, allow thoughtful reflection, and differentiate instruction from student to student across a diverse group of learners.</li></ul>International Association for K-12 Online Learning<br />http://www.inacol.org/resources/promisingpractices/NACOL_PP-BlendedLearning-lr.pdf<br />Blended/Hybrid Learning<br />
  18. 18. <ul><li>Ability to offer a variety of courses (as with distance learning) to a number of students spread out in different areas that might not otherwise be able to be offered.
  19. 19. More interaction between teacher and students.
  20. 20. More interaction/collaboration with peers.
  21. 21. Collection of resources, lessons, and activities to enhance/enrich learning. </li></ul>Possibilities<br />
  22. 22. <ul><li>Students are already learning online – this is just a structured learning environment that is designed to teach in an effective way.
  23. 23. Online learning is most successful when it engages students in a social way with each other, with the instructor, and in interaction with the course content.
  24. 24. Online learning is most effective for student achievement when it creates an exciting and safe learning environment, when students are held responsible for their own learning, and when students and teachers interact consistently.</li></ul>Final Thoughts<br />

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