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How Do I Get an Air Permit
in Texas?
A Practical Guide for Facility
Managers
March 11, 2014
James A. Westbrook
jwestbrook@...
Topics	
  
•  What	
  situa-ons	
  trigger	
  air	
  permi3ng	
  
requirements?	
  
•  Is	
  an	
  air	
  permit	
  requir...
About	
  the	
  Presenter	
  
•  Nearly	
  30	
  years	
  experience	
  with	
  air	
  permi3ng	
  
na-onwide,	
  more	
  ...
TCEQ	
  Air	
  Permi3ng	
  
www.tceq.state.tx.us/permi3ng/air/air_permits.html	
  
TCEQ	
  Air	
  Permits	
  Division	
  Org	
  Chart	
  
diesel	
  engine	
  
new	
  coa-ng	
  process	
  
modified	
  
paint	
  booth	
  
loading	
  
opera-on	
  
boiler	
  
porta...
Business	
  and	
  Regulatory	
  Changes	
  
Can	
  Trigger	
  Air	
  Permit	
  Needs	
  
BUSINESS	
  CHANGES:	
  
•  Chan...
Why	
  is	
  an	
  Air	
  Permit	
  Required?	
  
TAC	
  Title	
  30,	
  Part	
  1,	
  Chapter	
  116.110:	
  
Before	
  a...
Permit	
  Review	
  Approach	
  
•  Iden-fy	
  all	
  equipment	
  affected	
  by	
  changes	
  
•  Establish	
  permit	
  ...
TCEQ	
  General	
  NSR	
  Permit	
  Review	
  
Processes	
  
•  De	
  minimis	
  
•  Permits	
  by	
  Rule	
  
•  Standard...
 
	
  
De	
  Minimis	
  Facili-es	
  &	
  Sources	
  
•  De	
  minimis	
  -­‐	
  do	
  not	
  have	
  to	
  obtain	
  and	...
 
	
  
Permit	
  By	
  Rule	
  Authoriza-ons	
  
•  Insignificant	
  facili-es	
  &	
  ac-vi-es	
  may	
  be	
  permiGed	
 ...
 
	
  
Standard	
  Permits	
  
•  Standard	
  permits	
  are	
  only	
  available	
  for	
  certain	
  project	
  
types,	...
 
	
  
Standard	
  Permits	
  Project	
  Type	
  
Examples	
  
•  Boilers	
  
•  Concrete	
  Batch	
  Plants	
  
•  CoGon	...
 
	
  
Minor	
  NSR	
  Permits	
  
•  Case-­‐by-­‐case	
  permits	
  for	
  minor	
  sources,	
  which	
  
do	
  not	
  tr...
 
	
  
Major	
  NSR	
  Permits	
  
•  Case-­‐by-­‐case	
  permits	
  for	
  facili-es	
  that	
  trigger	
  
major	
  sour...
Case-­‐by-­‐Case	
  NSR	
  
•  If	
  not	
  Permit	
  by	
  Rule	
  or	
  Standard	
  permit	
  
•  Emission	
  increases	...
Opera-ng	
  w/o	
  a	
  Permit?	
  
•  What	
  if	
  I	
  find	
  I	
  am	
  opera-ng	
  without	
  a	
  permit?	
  
•  Doc...
Recommenda-ons	
  
•  Keep	
  an	
  accurate	
  equipment	
  inventory	
  and	
  log	
  books	
  
•  Periodically	
  audit...
Air Permit Application
Steps in Texas
What	
  are	
  your	
  Permi3ng	
  Objec-ves?	
  
•  Get	
  the	
  permit,	
  move	
  project	
  development	
  forward	
 ...
Air	
  Permi3ng	
  Process	
  -­‐	
  Summary	
  
Applica-on	
  Process	
  in	
  Texas	
  
•  Permit	
  feasibility	
  review;	
  review	
  thresholds	
  and	
  project	
  ...
Planning	
  &	
  Feasibility	
  Analysis	
  
•  Plan	
  early	
  at	
  the	
  drawing	
  board	
  
•  Technical	
  Issues	...
Applicability	
  Thresholds	
  
•  Emissions	
  calcula-ons	
  are	
  used	
  to	
  determine	
  
applicability	
  of	
  t...
Air	
  Quality	
  Impact	
  Analysis	
  
•  Typically	
  required	
  for	
  case-­‐by-­‐case	
  NSR	
  
•  Na-onal	
  ambi...
Subchapter	
  B	
  –	
  Ini-al/Administra-ve	
  Review	
  
•  Typically	
  take	
  less	
  than	
  30	
  days	
  and	
  co...
Subchapter	
  B	
  –	
  Technical	
  Review	
  
•  The	
  technical	
  review	
  primarily	
  relates	
  to	
  source	
  i...
Permit	
  Review	
  and	
  Nego-a-on	
  
•  Carefully	
  review	
  the	
  permit	
  and	
  meet	
  with	
  
the	
  TCEQ	
 ...
Permit	
  Opera-ons	
  
•  Start	
  opera-ons	
  and	
  show	
  compliance	
  
–  With	
  the	
  permit	
  and	
  applicab...
Summary	
  -­‐	
  Air	
  Permi3ng	
  
•  Establish	
  a	
  permit	
  management	
  program	
  
–  Inventory	
  equipment,	...
Contact	
  Informa-on	
  
James	
  A.	
  Westbrook	
  
BlueScape	
  Environmental	
  
877-­‐486-­‐9257	
  
jwestbrook@blue...
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BlueScape How Do I Get an Air Permit in Texas? Webinar 3-11-14

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This webinar was performed by James Westbrook, President of BlueScape Environmental to provide you with practical training from the viewpoint of a facility manager or project developer. For projects in Texas, you will learn how to assess whether a permit is required for new or modified equipment, to review the feasibility of meeting permitting requirements and rule conditions, to complete the steps for writing an application to obtain a permit, and to negotiate permit conditions with the air district. James can be reached at 858-774-2009.

For a video presentation, visit BlueScape's YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKXZeqMeJms. Also see www.bluescapeinc.com.

Published in: Environment
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BlueScape How Do I Get an Air Permit in Texas? Webinar 3-11-14

  1. 1. How Do I Get an Air Permit in Texas? A Practical Guide for Facility Managers March 11, 2014 James A. Westbrook jwestbrook@bluescapeinc.com 877-486-9257
  2. 2. Topics   •  What  situa-ons  trigger  air  permi3ng   requirements?   •  Is  an  air  permit  required?   •  What  are  the  permi3ng  op-ons  available?   •  Air  permi3ng  steps  in  Texas   –  Preliminary  design  review  and  permit  feasibility   –  Applica-on:  fees,  forms,  rule  review,  New  Source   Review,  special  technical  studies,  etc.   –  Applica-on  submiGal  process   –  Nego-a-ng  a  final  permit  
  3. 3. About  the  Presenter   •  Nearly  30  years  experience  with  air  permi3ng   na-onwide,  more  than  100  projects   •  Power  plants,  industrial  cogen,  LNG  facili-es,  building   materials,  aerospace,  refineries,  oil  &  gas  processing   •  Solve  tough  air  permi3ng  issues  and  get  the  permit:   -­‐  Develop  permi3ng  strategy,  quickly  obtain  permits   -­‐  Reduce  impacts  on  opera-onal  flexibility   -­‐  Excel  in  technical  analysis  tools,  emission  controls  and  modeling   -­‐  Develop  workable  monitoring,  recordkeeping  and  repor-ng   -­‐  Established  agency  rela-onships,  lead  nego-a-ons    
  4. 4. TCEQ  Air  Permi3ng   www.tceq.state.tx.us/permi3ng/air/air_permits.html  
  5. 5. TCEQ  Air  Permits  Division  Org  Chart  
  6. 6. diesel  engine   new  coa-ng  process   modified   paint  booth   loading   opera-on   boiler   portable   sprayer   portable  concrete   plant   cooling  tower   chemical   storage   baghouse   hospital   data  center   oil  drilling   refinery   heater   Title  V   facility   heat   trea-ng   merger   third-­‐party   con-guous  proper-es  
  7. 7. Business  and  Regulatory  Changes   Can  Trigger  Air  Permit  Needs   BUSINESS  CHANGES:   •  Change,  expand  or  consolidate  opera-ons   –  New  equipment   –  Modified  equipment   •  Physical  modifica-on   •  Change  in  method  of  opera-on   –  Change  in  equipment  descrip-on,  permit  condi-ons   •  Upgrade,  retrofit  or  replace  equipment   –  New  or  modified  equipment   –  Change  in  permit  condi-ons  (not  physically  modified)   –  Emission  reduc-ons,  and  apply  for  offsets   •  Change  of  ownership,  mergers,  acquisi-on   •  Rental  equipment   REGULATORY  CHANGES:   •  Comply  with  new  emission  control  requirements   •  New  Federal  rule  applicability   –  Title  V,  NESHAP,  NSPS  
  8. 8. Why  is  an  Air  Permit  Required?   TAC  Title  30,  Part  1,  Chapter  116.110:   Before  any  actual  work  is  begun  on  the  facility,  any  person  who  plans  to   construct  any  new  facility  or  engage  in  the  modifica:on  of  any  exis:ng   facility  which  may  emit  air  contaminants  into  the  air  of  this  state  shall   either:   -­‐  Obtain  a  permit  under  Sec:on  116.111  (General  Applica:on);   -­‐  Sa:sfy  the  condi:ons  for  a  standard  permit;   -­‐  Sa:sfy  the  condi:ons  for  a  flexible  permit;   -­‐  Sa:sfy  the  condi:ons  for  facili:es  permiHed  by  rule;  or   -­‐  Sa:sfy  the  criteria  for  a  de  minimis  facility  or  source   Modifica:ons  to  exis:ng  permiJng  facili:es  may  be  handled  through   the  amendment  of  an  exis:ng  permit   Consequence  of  non-­‐compliance:  viola3ons,  fines,  even  an  order  to   shutdown!  
  9. 9. Permit  Review  Approach   •  Iden-fy  all  equipment  affected  by  changes   •  Establish  permit  ownership   •  Know  ways  equipment  will  be  used,  and   alterna-ves   •  What  is  the  best  permit  structure  for  opera-ons?   –  Will  higher  limits  be  required?   •  Is  facility  a  major  or  minor  facility   •  Take  ac-on:   -­‐  Document  as  diminimis  if  possible   -­‐  File  for  appropriate  permit  type   -­‐  Complete  case-­‐by-­‐case  NSR  review  if  required  
  10. 10. TCEQ  General  NSR  Permit  Review   Processes   •  De  minimis   •  Permits  by  Rule   •  Standard  Permits   •  Minor  New  Source   Review  Permits   •  Major  New  Source   Review  Permits  
  11. 11.     De  Minimis  Facili-es  &  Sources   •  De  minimis  -­‐  do  not  have  to  obtain  and  registra-on  or   authoriza-on  before  construc-on   •  Applicable  facili-es  or  sources  considered  de  minimis   –  Cleaning  &  stripping  solvent,  50  gal  per  year   –  Coa-ngs  (excluding  pla-ng  materials),  100  gal  per  year   –  Dyes,  1,000  pounds  per  year   –  Bleaches,  1,000  gal  per  year   –  Fragrances  (excluding  odorants),  250  gal  per  year   –  Water-­‐based  surfactants/detergents,  2,500  gal  per  year   •  Indoor  facili-es  or  sources  with  maximum  emissions  under   Effects  Screening  Levels  (ESL)  without  controls   •  Published  list:  www.tceq.texas.gov/permi3ng/air/guidance/ newsourcereview/list-­‐of-­‐de-­‐minimis-­‐facili-es.html/at_download/file   •  TCEQ  discre-on  on  case-­‐by-­‐case  basis  
  12. 12.     Permit  By  Rule  Authoriza-ons   •  Insignificant  facili-es  &  ac-vi-es  may  be  permiGed   by  rule  (TAC  Chapter  106)   •  Also  known  as  a  “Standard  Exemp-on”   •  A  facility  may  qualify  for  PBR  if  opera-on   emissions  less  than:   –  250  TPY  CO  or  NOx   –  25  TPY  VOC,  SOx  or  PM   –  15  TPY  PM10  or  10  TPY  PM2.5   •  There  are  120  individual  PBRs  that  may  be  claimed   •  Common  processes  such  as  boiler  and  heaters   •  Maximum  ra-ngs,  emission  limits,  recordkeeping    
  13. 13.     Standard  Permits   •  Standard  permits  are  only  available  for  certain  project   types,  to  streamline  NSR   •  Based  on  similarity  from  project  to  project   •  To  determine  compliance  with  all  applicable   requirements,  the  permit  review  must  perform:   –  Evalua-on  of  representa-ons   –  Emissions  calcula-ons   –  Evalua-on  of  any  other  supplemental  technical   informa-on  submiGed   •  Cannot  be  used  if  triggering  major  NSR   •  Best  Available  Control  Technology  (BACT)  required   •  Most  standard  permits  processed  in  45  days   •  A  few  Standard  Permits  contained  in  a  Rule  
  14. 14.     Standard  Permits  Project  Type   Examples   •  Boilers   •  Concrete  Batch  Plants   •  CoGon  gins  &  coGon  burr  tub   grinders   •  Dry  bulk  fer-lizer  handling   •  Electric  genera-ng  units   •  Feedmills,  portable  augers,   hay  grinders   •  Grain  elevator/grain  handling   •  Hot  mix  asphalt  plants   •  Municipal  solid-­‐waste  landfills   •  Oil  &  gas  facili-es   •  Peanut  handling   •  Pollu-on  control  projects   •  Polyphosphate  blenders   •  Portable  grain  augers   •  Rock/concrete  crushers   •  Sawmills  
  15. 15.     Minor  NSR  Permits   •  Case-­‐by-­‐case  permits  for  minor  sources,  which   do  not  trigger  major  source  permi3ng   •  Applica-on  process  includes:   –  Ini-al/Administra-ve  review   –  Technical  Review  (BACT  &  impact  analysis)   –  Draling  the  permit  more  involved,  specific  to  project   •  BACT  and  air  quality  modeling   •  Also  known  as  “Subchapter  B  Permits”  
  16. 16.     Major  NSR  Permits   •  Case-­‐by-­‐case  permits  for  facili-es  that  trigger   major  source  permi3ng   –  AGainment  areas  –  PSD   –  NonaGainment  areas       •  Title  V  is  is  required  when  a  site  emits  or  has  a   PTE  of:   –  10  TPY  a  single  HAP  or  25  TPY  any  combina-on  of   HAPs   –  100  TPY  of  any  regulated  pollutant      
  17. 17. Case-­‐by-­‐Case  NSR   •  If  not  Permit  by  Rule  or  Standard  permit   •  Emission  increases  from  new  or  modified   equipment,  exceeding  applicability  thresholds   •  Modified  –  physical  modifica-on  or  change  in   method  of  opera-on   –  Throughput  change  without  changing  a  permit  limit  does   not  count   •  In  Texas,  generally  for  aGainment  area  pollutants   •  Flexible  permits  are  possible;  facility  emission  caps   •  NSR  Requirements:   –  Best  available  control  technology   –  Emission  Offsets,  in  non-­‐aGainment  areas   –  Modeling  for  ambient  air  quality  standards    
  18. 18. Opera-ng  w/o  a  Permit?   •  What  if  I  find  I  am  opera-ng  without  a  permit?   •  Document  why  and  how  you  learned  about  it  –  you   will  need  these  details!   •  Consult  an  aGorney  familiar  with  air  districts  about   poten-al  legal  ac-on  against  your  company,  and   disclosure  needs   •  File  an  applica-on  with  TCEQ  as  soon  as  possible   –  Depending  on  aGorney  recommenda-on,  work  out  with   TCEQ  permit  engineer  or  enforcement   •  Breakdown?   –  Has  to  meet  breakdowns  rule,  unforeseen,  no-ce   required  
  19. 19. Recommenda-ons   •  Keep  an  accurate  equipment  inventory  and  log  books   •  Periodically  audit  facility  equipment  &  permits,  for   changes  in  rules  or  exemp-ons   •  Establish  a  management  of  change  policy,  to  evaluate   changes  for  business  ac-ons   •  Permit  by  Rule  or  Standard  Permit  when  possible   –  Unless  greater  emission  limits  needed,  then  case-­‐by-­‐case  NSR   •  Avoid  major  NSR,  explore  flexible  permi3ng   •  Maintain  a  working  rela-onship  with  agency  staff   •  Hire  experienced  consultants  and  aGorneys   –  Project  permit  design,  avoiding  opera-onal  issues   –  Address  issues  before  changes  are  made   –  Correc-ve  ac-on,  if  out  of  compliance  with  permit  and  rule  requirements  
  20. 20. Air Permit Application Steps in Texas
  21. 21. What  are  your  Permi3ng  Objec-ves?   •  Get  the  permit,  move  project  development  forward   –  Quick,  smooth,  hassle-­‐free  process   •  Save  money  on  equipment  and  emission  controls   •  Avoid  mistakes  in  equipment  selec-on   •  Minimize  regulatory  limita-ons  and  constraints   •  Maximize  opera-onal  flexibility   •  Get  ahead  of  changing,  stricter  requirements   •  Allow  for  future  plant  expansion  if  needed     An  air  permit  is  a  cri3cal  piece  of  business  insurance  !!  
  22. 22. Air  Permi3ng  Process  -­‐  Summary  
  23. 23. Applica-on  Process  in  Texas   •  Permit  feasibility  review;  review  thresholds  and  project  design   •  Pre-­‐applica-on  Mee-ng  with  TCEQ   •  Complete  Applica-on  Package  SubmiGal   –  Fees   –  Cover  LeGer   –  Forms  –  general,  equipment-­‐specific   –  Technical  Report  –  emissions,  BACT,  applicable  rules   –  Air  Quality  Impact  Analysis   –  Equipment  Specifica-ons   –  Manufacturer  Guarantees   –  Site  plans  and  area  maps   •  Applica-on  SubmiGal  Mee-ng   •  TCEQ  Ini-al  /  Administra-ve  Review   •  TCEQ  Technical  Review   •  Nego-ate  Permit  Condi-ons  
  24. 24. Planning  &  Feasibility  Analysis   •  Plan  early  at  the  drawing  board   •  Technical  Issues  review  –  “fatal-­‐flaw”  analysis   •  Data  development  –  project  design,  vendors,  geography     •  Issues  List:   –  Best  Available  Control  Technology  (BACT),  by  unit   –  Prohibitory  Rules  –  exemp-ons,  limits,  monitoring,  recordkeeping  and   repor-ng  requirements   –  Startup  and  Shutdown  Emissions,  Varying  Condi-ons   –  Emission  Offsets,  by  facility  /  project   –  Title  V  and  PSD  permi3ng,  by  facility  /  project   –  Air  Quality  Impacts   –  Poten-al  to  develop  Emission  Credits  for  sale   •  Community  Support  and  Involvement   •  How  feasible  is  this  project,  what  must  happen?   •  Develop  a  Permi3ng  Strategy  and  Workplan    
  25. 25. Applicability  Thresholds   •  Emissions  calcula-ons  are  used  to  determine   applicability  of  the  following:   –  New  Source  Review     •  Best  Available  Control  Technology  (BACT)   •  Emission  Offsets   •  Emission  Limits   •  Air  Quality  Impact  Assessment   •  Monitoring,  Recordkeeping,  Repor-ng     –  New  Source  Performance  Standards  (NSPS)   –  Na-onal  Emission  Standards  for  Hazardous  Air   Pollutants  (NESHAP)    
  26. 26. Air  Quality  Impact  Analysis   •  Typically  required  for  case-­‐by-­‐case  NSR   •  Na-onal  ambient  air  quality  standards   –  NO2,  PM10,  PM2.5,  SO2,  CO  and  VOC  (ozone)   •  ESLs  –  effects  screening  levels  for  short-­‐term   and  long-­‐term  health  effects  (ex  benzene)   •  Agency  will  run  an  independent  analysis   •  Must  show  compliance  to  get  the  permit  
  27. 27. Subchapter  B  –  Ini-al/Administra-ve  Review   •  Typically  take  less  than  30  days  and  consists  of:   –  Logging  the  project  into  the  NSR  database  and  assignment  of  project  and  permit   numbers;   –  Verifica-on  of  the  address,  legal  en-ty  name,  and  that  the  applica-on  contains  the   appropriate  signatures;   –  Determina-on  of  whether  or  not  the  en-ty  is  a  small  business;   –  Verifica-on  of  payment  of  fees  and  that  there  are  no  current  delinquent  fees;   –  Determina-on  of  the  applicability  of  special  interest  programs  (such  as  the  Air  Pollutant   Watch  List);   –  Update  of  informa-on  in  the  TCEQ's  Central  Registry  database;   –  Prepara-on  and  submiGal  of  the  site  review  Request  for  Comments  (RFC)  to  the   appropriate  regional  office;   –  Determina-on  of  the  type  of  public  no-ce  required  based  on  the  applica-on   informa-on;   –  Prepara-on  of  the  first  public  no-ce  package;   –  Iden-fica-on  of  affected  legislators;  and   –  A  declara-on  that  the  applica-on  is  administra-vely  complete.  
  28. 28. Subchapter  B  –  Technical  Review   •  The  technical  review  primarily  relates  to  source  iden-fica-on   and  air  emission  quan-fica-on,  analysis  of  off-­‐property  health   impacts  of  emissions  (screen  modeling  or  refined  modeling),   determina-on  of  best  available  control  technology  (BACT),   and  applicability  of  any  source  category  or  emission-­‐based   state  and  federal  regula-ons.  
  29. 29. Permit  Review  and  Nego-a-on   •  Carefully  review  the  permit  and  meet  with   the  TCEQ   –  Much  can  be  nego-ated  to  allow  flexibility   •  Public  Review  and  Comment  period,  if   applicable  –  add  30-­‐45  days   •  Final  permit  issuance  for  construc-on   •  Do  I  need  the  permit  before  I  can  start  any   construc-on?    
  30. 30. Permit  Opera-ons   •  Start  opera-ons  and  show  compliance   –  With  the  permit  and  applicable  rules  and   regula-ons   •  Monitoring,  recordkeeping,  and  repor-ng   procedures  –  in  place,  track,  track!   •  No-fica-ons  and  protocols  to  agency   •  Emissions  source  tes-ng   •  TCEQ  ini-al  inspec-on  –  show  all  permit   condi-ons  are  met    
  31. 31. Summary  -­‐  Air  Permi3ng   •  Establish  a  permit  management  program   –  Inventory  equipment,  track  changes,  record   determina-ons   •  Understand  the  air  permi3ng  steps   •  Get  the  right  resources  to  help  you  through   challenging  parts  of  air  permi3ng:   –  Designing  a  project  to  meet  your  objec-ves   –  Technical  studies,  emissions,  BACT,  modeling   –  Nego-a-ng  permit  condi-ons  with  the  agency   •  If  you  need  it,  go  get  the  Air  Permit!  
  32. 32. Contact  Informa-on   James  A.  Westbrook   BlueScape  Environmental   877-­‐486-­‐9257   jwestbrook@bluescapeinc.com   www.bluescapeinc.com   Connect  with  me  on  Linkedin!     The  webinar  presenta:on  will  be  posted  on  Slideshare   and  YouTube  (search  for  BlueScape)  

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