Flipping Your Higher Ed Classroom

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Flipping your higher ed classroom is an involved process. This presentation walks you through flipped classroom definitions to models for flipping your own class.

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  • Let’s start with a quick audience participation….What is your understanding of the “Flipped Classroom”
  • “Flipping the classroom” has become something of a buzzword

    In essence, “flipping the classroom” means that students gain first exposure to new material outside of class, usually via reading or lecture videos, and then use class time to do the harder work of assimilating that knowledge, perhaps through problem-solving, discussion, or debates.




    The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed.

    Short video lectures are viewed by students at home before the class session, while in-class time is devoted to exercises, projects, or discussions. The video lecture is often seen as the key ingredient
    in the flipped approach, such lectures being either created by the instructor and posted online or selected from an online repository.

    While a prerecorded lecture could certainly be a podcast or other audio format, the ease with which video can be accessed and viewed today has made it so ubiquitous that the flipped model has
    come to be identified with it. The notion of a flipped classroom draws on such concepts as active learning, student engagement, hybrid course design, and course podcasting. The value of a flipped class is in the repurposing of class time into a workshop where students can inquire about lecture content, test their skills in applying knowledge, and interact with one another in hands-on activities. During class sessions, instructors function as coaches or advisors, encouraging students in individual inquiry and collaborative effort.
  • “Flipping the classroom” has become something of a buzzword

    In essence, “flipping the classroom” means that students gain first exposure to new material outside of class, usually via reading or lecture videos, and then use class time to do the harder work of assimilating that knowledge, perhaps through problem-solving, discussion, or debates.




    The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed.

    Short video lectures are viewed by students at home before the class session, while in-class time is devoted to exercises, projects, or discussions. The video lecture is often seen as the key ingredient
    in the flipped approach, such lectures being either created by the instructor and posted online or selected from an online repository.

    While a prerecorded lecture could certainly be a podcast or other audio format, the ease with which video can be accessed and viewed today has made it so ubiquitous that the flipped model has
    come to be identified with it. The notion of a flipped classroom draws on such concepts as active learning, student engagement, hybrid course design, and course podcasting. The value of a flipped class is in the repurposing of class time into a workshop where students can inquire about lecture content, test their skills in applying knowledge, and interact with one another in hands-on activities. During class sessions, instructors function as coaches or advisors, encouraging students in individual inquiry and collaborative effort.
  • Need to place something here……

    Flipping the classroom is a subset of Blended Learning – the integration of technology into learning
  • So why do it?
  • So if we consider the way we remember….

    Within 2 wks we only remember 10% of what we read,
    50% of what we hear and say, 90% of what we both say and do
  • University of Sydney
    http://sydney.edu.au/staff/fye/during_semester/active_learning.shtml
  • University of Sydney
    http://sydney.edu.au/staff/fye/during_semester/active_learning.shtml
  • If we take a look at the top motivations for Flipping Courses in Higher Ed,
    Improve students critical thinking, creative problem solving, higher order thinking ranks highest
    Increasing student participation

    Notably, faculty related goals rank quite low….it’s a more student-centred approach
  • We can start to see why student attitudes are positive…not all students agree with the approach, but there’s enough evidence around to support a very positive impact
  • Bergmann, Overmeyer and Willie (2011) list several advantages for the Flipped Classroom. Three of the most applicable are:

    Development of life-long learners: Students learn content before coming to class with the aide of technology. This type of knowledge acquisition, and the computer skills associated with it is a skill that life-long learners in our computer driven society use, but are not born with. Using this strategy helps develop this skill
    Increased engagement in the material: During class, students complete active learning exercises that illustrate the applications, implications and/or controversies associated with the material. This illustrates the importance of the material into their everyday lives and helps students relate to the topic.
    Increased interactions between students and faculty: entire class periods are dedicated to the conversations between the students as they complete the in-class activities. Using this strategy shifts the focus from the front of the room. It moves the faculty member to interacting one-on-one with the students.
  • There is no single model for the flipped classroom—the term is widely used to describe almost any class structure that provides prerecorded lectures followed by in-class exercises. In one
    common model, students might view multiple lectures of five to seven minutes each. Online quizzes or activities can be interspersed to test what students have learned. Immediate quiz feedback and
    the ability to rerun lecture segments may help clarify points of confusion. Instructors might lead in-class discussions or turn the classroom into a studio where students create, collaborate, and put
    into practice what they learned from the lectures they view outside class. As on-site experts, instructors suggest various approaches, clarify content, and monitor progress. They might organize
    students into an ad hoc workgroup to solve a problem that several are struggling to understand. Because this approach represents a comprehensive change in the class dynamic, some instructors have
    chosen to implement only a few elements of the flipped model or to flip only a few selected class sessions during a term.
  • There is no single model for the flipped classroom—the term is widely used to describe almost any class structure that provides prerecorded lectures followed by in-class exercises. In one
    common model, students might view multiple lectures of five to seven minutes each. Online quizzes or activities can be interspersed to test what students have learned. Immediate quiz feedback and
    the ability to rerun lecture segments may help clarify points of confusion. Instructors might lead in-class discussions or turn the classroom into a studio where students create, collaborate, and put
    into practice what they learned from the lectures they view outside class. As on-site experts, instructors suggest various approaches, clarify content, and monitor progress. They might organize
    students into an ad hoc workgroup to solve a problem that several are struggling to understand. Because this approach represents a comprehensive change in the class dynamic, some instructors have
    chosen to implement only a few elements of the flipped model or to flip only a few selected class sessions during a term.
  • Some noteworthy problems exist when thinking about using the flipped classroom in higher education settings.
    If video lectures drive the instruction, it is just a repackaging of a more traditional model of didactic learning.  It is not a new paradigm nor pedagogy of learning.

    Educators need to be re-educated as to what to do with the class time that previously was used for their lectures.
  • There is no single model for the flipped classroom—the term is widely used to describe almost any class structure that provides prerecorded lectures followed by in-class exercises. In one
    common model, students might view multiple lectures of five to seven minutes each. Online quizzes or activities can be interspersed to test what students have learned. Immediate quiz feedback and
    the ability to rerun lecture segments may help clarify points of confusion. Instructors might lead in-class discussions or turn the classroom into a studio where students create, collaborate, and put
    into practice what they learned from the lectures they view outside class. As on-site experts, instructors suggest various approaches, clarify content, and monitor progress. They might organize
    students into an ad hoc workgroup to solve a problem that several are struggling to understand. Because this approach represents a comprehensive change in the class dynamic, some instructors have
    chosen to implement only a few elements of the flipped model or to flip only a few selected class sessions during a term.
  • Experiential Learning Cycle model emphasizes the nature of experience being fundamental to education & training. Process of making meaning from direct experience

    Teacher structures and organises a series of experiences which positively influence each individual’s potential future experiences. Eg Good experiences motivate, encourage and enable students to go on and have more valuable learning
    The instructor‟s primary roles include setting suitable experiences, posing problems, setting boundaries, supporting students, insuring physical and emotional safety, and facilitating the learning process.

    Think about riding a bike
    Learner experiences the here and now
    Experience forms basis for observation and reflection – what is working/failing
    Think about ways to improve next attempt – abstract conceptualisation
    Go do it again

    Eg
    Making products or models
    Role-playing
    Giving a presentation
    Problem solving
    Playing a game
    Field trip to the zoo
    Placement / job shadowing
    The history of our world in 18 minutes. http://www.ted.com/talks/david_christian_big_history
    From 13 billion years to today.


    The Experiential Learning Cycle models emphasize that the nature of experience is of fundamental importance and concern in education and training.  It is the teacher’s responsibility to structure and organize a series of experiences which positively influence each individual’s potential future experiences.  In other words, “good experiences” motivate, encourage, and enable students to go on to have more valuable learning experiences. Experiential Learning Cycles can be seen as providing a semi-structured approach.  There is relative freedom to go ahead in activity and “experience”, but the educator also commits to structuring other stages, usually involving some form of planning or reflection, so that “raw experience” is package with facilitated cognitive (usually) thinking about the experience. 
    (http://wilderdom.com/experiential/elc/ExperientialLearningCycle.htm)
  • http://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2012/05/15/flipped-classroom-the-full-picture-for-higher-education/
  • The cycle often begins with an experiential exercise. 
    Authentic, often hands-on, learning activity that fully engages the student.  
    It engages most if not all senses. – it is immersive.

    Role of the Educator is to facilitate the experience
    GOAL – engaging and authentic learning activity to introduce to the course topic and create a desire to want to learn more.

    This is now one of the uses for F2f time
    A lot of mobile device input – photo / video sharing of experiences, Interviews etc.

    Options
    Team problem solving activities
    Experiments
    Experiential mobile acitivities
    Physical / Virtual field trips
    Placement
    Online Simulations
    Google Earth tour / Art project

    Experiencing/Exploring “Doing”
    Students will perform or do a hands-on minds-on experience with little or no help from the instructor. Examples might include: Making products or models, role-playing, giving a presentation, problem-solving, playing a game. A key facet of experiential learning is what the student learns from the experience rather than the quantity or quality of the experience.


    ------------------------


    It is a concrete experience that calls for attention by most, if not all, the senses.  According to McCarthy, learning activities are designed that are immersive.  Learners “experience the now.”  They become hooked through and motivated by personal connection to the experience, and a desire to create meaning for and about that experience (ala constructivist learning).
    These are teacher generated and facilitated.  They work best during classroom time.  These are those “what to do with the time that used to be filled with lectures” class activities.
    The options for experiential engagement are limitless.   Again, the goal is to offer an engaging and authentic learning activity that introduces learners to the course topic, that creates a desire for them to want to learn more. Options include:
    Team Problem Solving Activities: Wilderdom, Teampedia
    Science Experiments: Steve Spangler Science Experiments, Kitchen Science Experiments
    Experiential Mobile Activities (Note: Some of these can also be used for online courses)
    The Arts: Artsedge
    Facilitating experiential activities may be tricky, at first, for those who have never led them.  Experiential activities are often used for organizational development and corporate training.  As such, those new to their use can get ideas for the how-to facilitation through business related websites:
    Guide to Facilitating Effective Experiential Learning Activities
    Tips for Getting Started
    There are also some options for online courses:
    Virtual Field Trips: 100 Incredible Educational Virtual Tours
    Online Simulations:  PhET Science Simulations, National Library of Virtual Manipulatives
    Google: Google Earth Tours, Google Art Project
    Students can conduct interviews or take photos or videos and post these online, e.g., Picture Your Values
  • Learn concepts touched on in the experiential engagement phase
    Explore what experts have to say.
    Video rich lecture, simulations, online text/readings.

    This is where we help students learn the abstract concepts related to the topic being covered.
    Role of teacher is to offer learners choice of content;
    Khan Academy
    Youtube Education for Universities
    Academic Earth
    videolectures.net
    webcast.berkley
    MIT Opencourse
    iTunes-U

    Teachers can also record their own lectures.
    This phase introduces online discussion for asking questions – learners can pose thoughts/opinions

    Sharing/Reflecting “What Happened?”
    Students will share the results, reactions and observations with their peers. Students will also get other peers to talk about their own experience, share their reactions and observations and discuss feelings generated by the experience. The sharing equates to reflecting on what they discovered and relating it to past experiences which can be used for future use.

    Processing/Analyzing “What’s Important?”
    Students will discuss, analyze and reflect upon the experience. Describing and analyzing their experiences allow students to relate them to future learning experiences. Students will also discuss how the experience was carried out, how themes, problems and issues emerged as a result of the experience. Students will discuss how specific problems or issues were addressed and to identify recurring themes.


    --------

    During this phase, learners are exposed to and learn concepts touched upon during Experiential Engagement.  They explore what the experts have to say about the topic.  Information is presented via video lecture, content-rich websites and simulations, and/or online text/readings.  In the case of the flipped classroom as it is being currently discussed, this is the time in the learning cycle when the learners view content-rich videos.  This is where and when videos are used to help students learn the abstract concepts related to the topic being covered. The role of the teacher, during this phase, is to offer the learners choices of video and related online content.
    Some video archives and related online resources that may be of value in higher education include:
    Khan Academy
    Youtube Education for Universities
    Academic Earth
    videolectures.net
    webcast.berkley
    MIT Opencourse
    iTunes-U
    Teachers can also record their own lectures for student viewing.  Some tools to do so include:
    Camtasia Studio (PC) or Camtasia for Mac
    Jing
    Snagit
    Screenflow
    Screencast-o-matic
    Screenr
    Educreations
    (Note:  Describing the specific technologies that one can use to record one’s own lectures is not the intent of this post.  I recommend doing further research to decide which tools would be most appropriate.)
    Free online courses by major universities also offer some materials that can be used to assist students in developing an understanding content-related knowledge:
    Open Yale Courses
    Saylor.org
    Coursera
    Part of this phase can include an online chat for asking and addressing questions about the content presented via the videos, podcasts, websites.  Through online “chat” areas, learners can ask questions and post thoughts and opinions.   Responses can  then be provided by co-learners and educators.
    TitanPad
    TodaysMeet
    Google Docs
    Elluminate, Adobe Connect or Blackboard Collaborate Rooms with chat functions
    Obviously, in a face-to-face setting, students can bring their questions into the real time environment where questions and answer periods become part of the in class activities.
  • Learners reflect on their understanding of what has been discovered thus far.
    Deep reflection of what was experienced (Phase 1) and what was learned (Phase 2)

    Most powerful learning often happens when students self-monitor or reflect.
    Students not always aware of what they are learning & experiencing – teachers can raise consciousness about their own reactions to these concepts.

    Educator can demonstrate reflection strategies and offer choices for students, but focus should be on the learner constructing his/her understanding of the topic.
    Blogs
    Audio / Video recordings
    Facebook group
    Voice thread

    Generalizing “So What?”
    Students will connect the experience with real world examples, find trends or common truths in the experience, and identify “real life” principles that emerged.


    -------

    Learners reflect on their understanding of what was discovered during the previous phases.  It is a phase of deep reflection on what was experienced during the first phase and what was learned via the experts during the second phase. Learners develop skills for reflective practice through discussing, reviewing, analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing key learning through their experiential activities and exploration of expert commentaries.
    I discussed the importance of reflection in a blog post, Where is reflection in the learning process?
    Learners do not just receive information only at the time it is given; they absorb information in many different ways, often after the fact, through reflection. The most powerful learning often happens when students self-monitor, or reflect.
    Students may not always be aware of what they are learning and experiencing. Teachers must raise students’ consciousness about underlying concepts and about their own reactions to these concepts. ETE Team
    During this phase, the educator can demonstrate reflection strategies and offer choices for student reflections, but the focus should be on the learner constructing his or her understanding of the topic.  Learners can articulate and construct their understanding of the content or topic being covered through a variety of technology tools:
    Blogs such as WordPress or Blogger: Student examples can be found at http://gretelpatch.wordpress.com/ (graduate student in Educational Technology) and http://perfectlypaigespage.blogspot.com/ (undergraduate student in Interpersonal Relations).
    Audio and Video Recordings
    Facebook Group Page:  Facebook introduced Groups for Schools.  An example for my Interpersonal Relations course can be found at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Broadview-Interpersonal-Relations-Course/241152722603421
    Voicethread: The advantage of using Voicethread is that students can hear review the ideas of other students and have a choice in the type of medium used; video, audio, or written.  The Voicethread set up for my undergraduate course on Interpersonal Relations is at http://voicethread.com/?#u1025159.b2349919.i15073398 and the one for m graduate course on Integrating Technology Into the Classroom at http://voicethread.com/?#u1025159.b1372964.i7281354
    Within the standard school system where testing is the expectation, this would be the phase when students are tested about their understanding of the content.  If this is the case, it is recommended that the tests target higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy – evaluation, applying, synthesizing.
  • During this phase learners get to demonstrate what they learned and apply the material in a way that makes sense.
    Moves beyond just reflection, in esscence – make concrete plans around how they will use this course content in their lives
    This is inline with the highest level of learning within Bloom’s revised taxonomy of learning – Creating. Can the student create a new product or point of view?

    Examples
    10 commandments of teaching strategies
    A calendar of application ideas
    How the course concepts apply to a culture.

    Linking more closely to now saying that here is x, and I’m a master of it. Who would like to know about this?

    Application “Now What?”
    Students will apply what they learned in the experience (and what they learned from past experiences and practice) to a similar or different situation. Also, students will discuss how the newly learned process can be applied to other situations. Students will discuss how issues raised can be useful in future situations and how more effective behaviors can develop from what they learned. The instructor should help each student feel a sense of ownership for what was learned.


    ----------

    During this phase, learners get to demonstrate what they learned and apply the material in a way that makes sense to them.
    When students have multiple choices in ways to demonstrate their knowledge, the evidence of their learning is more accurate. We wanted the students to actually become the experts through the learning process. This assessment isn’t just a fancy term for a presentation at the end of a unit. To actually engage in an authentic celebration is to witness a true display of student understanding. (http://education.jhu.edu/newhorizons/strategies/topics/Assessment%20Alternatives/meyer_glock.htm)
    This goes beyond reflection and personal understanding in that learners have to create something that is individualized and extends beyond the lesson with applicability to the learners’ everyday lives. Opportunities should be provided for students to, at the very least, make concrete plans how they will use the course content in other aspects of their lives.
    This is in line with the highest level of learning within Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Learning – Creating - whereby the learner creates a new product or point of view. In essence, they become the storytellers of their learning (See Narratives in the 21st Century: Narratives in Search of Contexts).  A list of technology-enhanced ideas/options for the celebration of learning can be found at: http://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2010/09/09/a-technology-enhanced-celebration-of-learning/
    Here is a slideshow of former students’ Demonstration and Application projects and presentations.
    Examples included:
    A ten commandments of teaching strategies.
    A calendar where each month had reminders of application ideas.
    A Minecraft video of what was learned and how it is being applied in his life.
    A Medicine Wheel by a Zuni student about how the course concepts applied to the Native American culture.
  • A parallel activity for those multi-taskers in the room…

    Consider some ideas for what Phase 1 – Experiential Engagement may look like in your teaching….
  • Before the change to the flipped classroom model, an evaluation of the engineering program by a professional body revealed that graduates were not equipped with the requisite skills for professional practice, as the curriculum lacked authentic contexts. The other ongoing issue was the need to engage and retain a large cohort of students throughout a complex, high workload program and provide each with equal opportunities to succeed.

    The other ongoing issue was the need to engage and retain a large cohort of students throughout a complex, high workload program and provide each with equal opportunities to succeed.
  • Before the change to the flipped classroom model, an evaluation of the engineering program by a professional body revealed that graduates were not equipped with the requisite skills for professional practice, as the curriculum lacked authentic contexts. The other ongoing issue was the need to engage and retain a large cohort of students throughout a complex, high workload program and provide each with equal opportunities to succeed.

    The other ongoing issue was the need to engage and retain a large cohort of students throughout a complex, high workload program and provide each with equal opportunities to succeed.
  • It was important to think of how the project was going to work in terms of pedagogy and to maximise opportunities for active learning.
    It was a large team effort—fuelled partly by a grant from the office of the UQ Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)—to design and deliver the program, with extensive planning in the form of a design project to work out how to ‘pull students through the curriculum’. A lot of time was invested in developing relationships with the teaching team to concept map the course requirements. The online component also took substantial planning, design and expertise to ensure the online content was designed accrodginly
  • In the face-to-face sessions, students were immersed in problem-based learning activities to build teamwork, communication and project management skills.
    Engagement strategies included:
    Avoiding transferring content by creating the lectures around a narrative of how engineers make decisions, utilise tools, and use mathematical and computational models and engineering materials to create an artifact or object, the performance of which students can then predict.
    Frequent communication with students in the first six weeks on Blackboard forums, mainly to lure them away from social media such as Facebook to join the course discussions.

    Creating a forum in the LMS called ‘Things that make you want to scream’, to hear about and tackle students’ issues.
    Weekly meetings with project leaders and tutors (about 40) to communicate and tackle problems that students were having during the course.
    Expectations for students to come to class prepared or risk falling behind their peers; this was a large part of the narrative.
    Assigning heavy weighting to a peer assessment component, to emphasise the need for teamwork and time management skills.

    Online component
    Video-based learning with the Salman Khan (of the Khan Academy) approach to break up the fundamentals of engineering into chunks of knowledge and concepts
    Blackboard used to host core learning materials, such as Khan-style videos, podcasts and other related content.
    Use of forums for Communication.
    online quizzes after students had worked through the material and a way of testing knowledge and creating directed knowledge pathways.



  • Outcome: The professor believes that using the flipped classroom model was the only way to achieve the aims of increasing the authenticity in the curriculum and to create opportunities for learner engagement. Placing core content online and setting expectations for learners to be prepared frees up time for active learning in the classroom. Considerable effort was expended to change and implement the curriculum, but future course iterations will only require review and ‘tweaking’. Carl claims that he does not teach the course, he designed it and, with the help of his team, set it in motion.
  • Initial increased PD to bring educators up to speed on technology
    Time investment in creating engaging content
    Reduced by OER (show Khan academy with xpLor)
    Content integrations


    The flipped classroom constitutes a role change for instructors, who give up their front-of-the-class position in favor of a more collaborative and cooperative contribution to the teaching process.
    There is a concomitant change in the role of students, many of whom are used to being cast as passive participants in the education process, where instruction is served to them. The flipped
    model puts more of the responsibility for learning on the shoulders of students while giving them greater impetus to experiment. Activities can be student-led, and communication among students can become the determining dynamic of a session devoted to learning through hands-on work. What the flip does particularly well is to bring about a distinctive shift in priorities from merely covering material to working toward mastery of it.
  • So a common theme that comes through in the Flipped Classroom is the use of technology to enhance the experience. Video lecture snippets. Online readings and interactive content, self-test quizzes, etc. A number of technologies and features to support you being able to flip the classroom


    Open Education resources such as the Khan academy seen here through Blackboard xpLor provide educators with access to a wealth of information to embed in their content.
  • Increasing tools available to support the out of class portion:

    Open Education resources such as the Khan academy seen here through Blackboard xpLor provide educators with access to a wealth of information to embed in their content. Tools such as xpLor also provide the ability for educators to share their collections of resources including their own learning objects with others
  • And taking that content and embedding directly into their LMS
  • And taking that content and embedding directly into their LMS
  • And taking that content and embedding directly into their LMS
  • Kaltura service providing that capabilities for educators to easily record some snippets to embed throughout the content
  • McGraw Hill was the first publisher to do a robust integration between their online learning platform, McGraw Hill Connect, and Blackboard Learn. As a matter of fact, their integrated product was a finalist in 2012 for the Software & Information Industry Association’s prestigious Codie award.

    Here’s an interactive labeling activity. The student has clicked on the assignment link that was deployed, and it took the student here to this fun and engaging page.

    It’s just a fill-in-the-blank and drag and drop exercise for parts of the brain. Wouldn’t you be intrigued to complete the exercise? All students need to do is click on the assignment link deployed in their course and this is what you get.
  • My MathLab is the singly most requested series to be integrated into Blackboard. Pearson is one of the most widely used examples of a cloud service in use today.

    MyMathLab serves 4.5 million students each year. The pre- and post-assessments in MyMathLab ensure that the 800,000 individuals who login each day experience their own unique learning path designed to meet their specific learning needs. This combination of powerful technology with engaging lessons delivers proven results.

    The MyLab and Mastering front list products are integrated into Blackboard.


  • Benefits of flipping the classroom;
  • Flipping Your Higher Ed Classroom

    1. 1. ® Flipping the Classroom Michael Garner, Solutions Engineer Monday 30th June 2014
    2. 2. What is Flipping the Classroom 2
    3. 3. What is Flipping the Classroom 3 http://www.knewton.com/flipped-classroom/
    4. 4. What is Flipping the Classroom 4
    5. 5. What is Flipping the Classroom 5
    6. 6. Why do it? 6
    7. 7. Slide Heading • Item 1 ++
    8. 8. Active Learning • Active learning involves students in doing things and thinking about what they are doing. This can include discussing, critical thinking, solving problems etc. Many studies indicate that students learn better from active rather than passive learning. Active learning strategies result in meaningful learning for the learner and thus are an important component to consider when developing a unit of study. University of Sydney
    9. 9. Active Learning Active learning methods are an effective way to: • motivate and engage students in the topic or area of study • encourage them to acquire self-directed learning skills • develop their research & critical thinking • develop skills in problem identification and solution, or community-engaged learning to prepare students for real work contexts • help them to understand the processes involved in the ongoing construction of knowledge in their field of interest.
    10. 10. Why do it? 10
    11. 11. Why do it? 1.Development of life-long learners 2.Increased engagement with material 3.Increased interactions between students and educators 12
    12. 12. How does it work? 13
    13. 13. How does it work • There is no single model 14
    14. 14. How does it work 15
    15. 15. The Flipped Classroom is NOT • Just online videos • About replacing teachers with videos • An online class • Students working without structure • Students working in isolation • A recording of last semesters full length lecture • Students spending the entire class online
    16. 16. The Flipped Classroom is • A means to increase teacher contact time • An environment that increases student responsibility • Blending of direct instruction and constructivist learning • Individualised or differentiated learning • A class where absent students won’t fall behind • A class where all students are engaged in their learning
    17. 17. Experiential Learning Cycle
    18. 18. But what do we do with f2f time?
    19. 19. Experiential Engagement: The Experience
    20. 20. Concept Exploration: The What
    21. 21. Meaning Making: The So What
    22. 22. Demonstration & Application: The Now What
    23. 23. Class Activity Consider some ideas for what Phase 1 – Experiential Engagement may look like in your teaching?
    24. 24. So who’s doing it? 25
    25. 25. So who’s doing it? Reason for adopting • Graduates were not equipped with the requisite skills for professional practice, • Curriculum lacked authentic contexts • Engagement and retention 26
    26. 26. So who’s doing it? Planning • How would it work form a pedagogical perspective • How to maximise active learning opportunities • Extensive content development 27
    27. 27. So who’s doing it? Engagement Strategies • Creating lectures around a narrative of how engineers utilies various skills • Frequent online engagement with students • Clear expectations of student participation • Assessment weighted appropriately to emphasise teamwork and time management 28
    28. 28. So who’s doing it? Conclusion • Only way to – increase authenticity in the curiculum – Cerate opportunities for learner engagement • Freeing up time in classroom for active learning by – Placing core content online – Setting expectations for Learners • Time and Expertise must be considered for initial implementation and ongoing “tweaking” 29
    29. 29. What are the implications for Learning & Teaching • Role change for instructors • Role change for students – passive to active participants in the education process – more of the responsibility for learning • Fosters a a distinctive shift in priorities from merely covering material to working toward mastery of it • Increased time for delivery • Content development • Professional Development for staff 30
    30. 30. Technologies supporting flipped classroom 31
    31. 31. What does the future hold? 32
    32. 32. What does the future hold? 33
    33. 33. 34
    34. 34. 35
    35. 35. What does the future hold? 36
    36. 36. 37
    37. 37. 38
    38. 38. Extending Professional Development Capability • Experienced in-region capability to assist with – Educational Strategy – Functional training and adoption
    39. 39. Tips & Tricks for first time flippers • Be mindful of how you pitch the flipped classroom to students • Use technology to increase, not decrease, interactions with students • Use student feedback and analytics to refine your flipped teaching strategies • Share ideas and solicit input from your fellow instructors about your flipped class
    40. 40. Questions to ask yourself • Was there an experiential component? • Was it engaging? • Was it an authentic, relevant, learning experience? • Did it facilitate critical, reflective thinking? • Did the learning activity change behaviour or thinking? 41
    41. 41. Class Activity Break into Groups and consider; • 3 benefits to your teaching • Example of a topic you might flip and ideas on how you might tackle it?
    42. 42. ® Thankyou Michael Garner Michael.arner@blackboard.com

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