Nisod14transdiscxenonon native

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Nisod14transdiscxenonon native

  1. 1. Transdisciplinary xenophilia: Thinking across disciplines worldwide Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 1
  2. 2. Thinking two ways globally Xenophilically Transdisciplinarily Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 2
  3. 3. Xeno- /non-native and “global” Non-native, “xeno-” Exotic/unusual/atypical Novel, unbounded Global Technologically speaking, “vertically” Geographically speaking, “horizontally” Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 3
  4. 4. Four features of both “globals” Access Openness Timelessness Customizability Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 4
  5. 5. Global access, technologically What this means Commonly, e.g., according to AIM (Accessible Inst Mats) Transdisciplinarily In classrooms, F2F, “flipping”, and online Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 5
  6. 6. Global access technologically > geographically (Xeno!) The question of ICT haves v. have-nots To be answered through better training? To be answered through better hardware? To be answered through better software? To be answered by economics &/or society? What about “compatibility”? Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 6
  7. 7. Global access, geographically What this means, xenophilically and otherwise Commonly/literally Transnationally Socioeconomic questions & answers Linguistic, cultural questions & answers Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 7
  8. 8. Global openness, technologically What this means… …In the common modern sense Open Source GNU, open OS Free Software (FSM) Open Courseware (OCW) …Transdisciplinarily Moodle, etc. Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 8
  9. 9. Global openness, geographically What it means Literally As practiced, or not (censure v. freedom of expression v. ethics) Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 9
  10. 10. Global timelessness, technologically What it means Windows of temporal opportunity The Just in Time (JIT) concept Cultural differences Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 10
  11. 11. Global timelessness, geographically What it means For students (on campus, off campus, way off campus, in service) For timeliness The notion of news The ephemeral v. the perennial Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 11
  12. 12. Global customizability, technologically What it means Seamlessness, simplicity, standardization, replicability Use of diverse range of tools for one goal Use of one tool for diverse goals Examples: Apple, Everywhere Tech Moodle Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 12
  13. 13. Global customizability, geographically What it means Technology is socially constructed The interface carries information & impact “Translation” is more than words alone (ideas, images, context) Politics, economics, diplomacy, sensitivity… Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 13
  14. 14. Globalism and transdisciplinarity What these mean in the 21st century Overall In education Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 14
  15. 15. Globalism and transnationality Geography, history, & determinism Geographical & technological determinisms International and/versus transnational Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 15
  16. 16. Global conclusions A conceptual grid: Vertical (tech) & horizontal (geography) Marrying the technological to the transnational: How? Awareness, cooperation, policies, ethics Trans- -generational -medial -systemic Xeno- -philia Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 16
  17. 17. Katherine Watson, Coastline Distance Learning 17

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