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From Peer to Leader: How to Develop Your First-Time Managers

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The transition from individual contributor to manager can be a daunting task. A survey by CEB, now Gartner, revealed that more than 50% of new managers fail. Balancing new responsibilities while learning how to lead former peers is a common challenge that most first-time managers struggle to overcome.

During this webinar, Learning & Development Manager Libby Mullen will discuss this challenge and five others that new managers face. She’ll explain why management training is a crucial element to success as your newly promoted managers transition to roles that require new, and frequently unfamiliar, skills and competencies.

Key takeaways:

Identify key strengths and improve weaknesses of first-time managers

Improve the relationship of new managers and their employees through emotional intelligence development and coaching techniques

Create a training plan that builds confidence and increases productivity for your new managers

Published in: Recruiting & HR
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From Peer to Leader: How to Develop Your First-Time Managers

  1. 1. Presenting Today Libby Mullen Learning & Development Manager BizLibrary Katie Miller Marketing Specialist BizLibrary
  2. 2. www.bizlibrary.com/demo
  3. 3. More than 50% of new managers fail in their first two years. - Corporate Executive Board
  4. 4. POLL QUESTION What best describes you? A. I’m an HR professional thinking about this organizationally.​ B. I lead new supervisors and want to help them succeed.​ C. I am a new supervisor/leader – and have been in the role for less than 6 months.​ D. I am a new supervisor/leader and have been for more than 6 months.​ E. Other – let us know in the group chat!
  5. 5. How would you describe your current training for new managers and supervisors? A. Fantastic! — A process-driven, blended approach with targeted learning and competencies.​ B. Good — we have a formal process and program, but I’m looking for some ideas for improvement.​ C. Just getting started — we don’t have a formal program in place, but usually cover the basics.​ D. Non-existent — We throw them in and hope they figure it out. POLL QUESTION
  6. 6. Today, You’ll Learn: • How to identify key strengths and improve weaknesses of first-time managers • Unique ways to improve the relationship of new managers and their employees through emotional intelligence development and coaching techniques • How to create a training plan that builds confidence and increases productivity for your new managers
  7. 7. “You’ve got to get clear in your head that you’re in a new role, you’ve got to look at the world differently, and you’ve got to try new things.” - Kevin Eikenberry, Author of Bud to Boss
  8. 8. Questions for Managers to Ask Themselves • Why you were promoted? • How you can use your strengths to find success? • What does your success will look like? • How are you going to develop a mindset that is geared towards your success?
  9. 9. Self Vs. Others • Empathy • Organizational awareness • Emotional self-awareness • Influence • Inspirational leadership • Coach and mentor • Conflict management • Teamwork • Emotional self-control • Adaptability • Achievement orientation • Positive outlook SELF AWARENESS SOCIAL AWARENESS SELF MANAGEMENT RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT SELF OTHERS ACTIONSAWARENESS
  10. 10. 1. Research indicates “great” managers listen well, motivate others, and consistently make good decisions. Do you see these traits in your manager? 2. Research indicates “great” managers are passionate about their work and compassionate toward others. Do you see these traits in your manager? 3. What would you recommend your manager keep doing? 4. What would you recommend your manager change about his or her approach to management? 5. What could your manager do to make your work experience more meaningful for you personally? 6. Do you receive an adequate level of feedback from your manager related to your work performance? 7. Does your manager have a solid grasp on the business as a whole beyond just his or her role or department? 8. Does your manager communicate individual and team objectives clearly?
  11. 11. 1. Research indicates “great” managers listen well, motivate others, and consistently make good decisions. Do you see these traits in your manager? 2. Research indicates “great” managers are passionate about their work and compassionate toward others. Do you see these traits in your manager? 3. What would you recommend your manager keep doing? 4. What would you recommend your manager change about his or her approach to management? Open-ended questions Defined questions
  12. 12. 5. What could your manager do to make your work experience more meaningful for you personally? 6. Do you receive an adequate level of feedback from your manager related to your work performance? 7. Does your manager have a solid grasp on the business beyond just his or her role or department? 8. Does your manager communicate individual and team objectives clearly? Relationship questions Communication and feedback questions
  13. 13. 6 Top Challenges of New Managers Balancing individual job responsibilities with time spent overseeing others Supervising friends or former peers Motivating the team Prioritizing projects Meeting higher performance expectations Inspiring unmotivated employees
  14. 14. What to Expect, and How to Overcome Balancing individual job responsibilities with time spent overseeing others Supervising friends or former peers Motivating the team
  15. 15. Six Keys to Cultivate Employee Engagement 1. Know the importance of their role: recognized & reward. 2. Have a good relationship with their coworkers. 3. Have opportunities to use their strengths. 4. Have a good relationship with their immediate supervisor (that’s you!) 5. Believe their work contributes to the company’s mission. 6. Have autonomy and independence (i.e. don’t micromanage) Source: https://www.shrm.org/ResourcesAndTools/business-solutions/Documents/2015-job-satisfaction-and-engagement-report.pdf
  16. 16. What to Expect, and How to Overcome Prioritizing projects Meeting higher performance expectations Inspiring unmotivated employees
  17. 17. Essential Skills of a Successful Manager • Emotional Intelligence • Managing Relationships • Overcoming the Threat of Favoritism • Earning Respect from Your Reports • Coaching & Feedback • Professionalism • Work Ethic • Appearance
  18. 18. Emotional Intelligence • Delegation • Performance • Listening • Coaching • Leadership • Strategic Thinking
  19. 19. Managing Relationships Co-managers Employees Boss Three Relationships
  20. 20. Overcoming the Threat of Favoritism
  21. 21. Earning Respect from Your Reports “Respect is something that must be earned. It is not awarded automatically when someone gets promoted to manager or gets a little gray at the temples. Managers earn respect when they are respectful to others, as well as when they demonstrate trustworthiness, credibility, and a healthy dose of humanity.” – Lisa Parker, author of Managing the Moment: A Leader’s Guide to Building Executive Presence One Interaction at a Time
  22. 22. Coaching & Feedback Organizations with senior leaders who coach effectively and frequently IMPROVE BUSINESS RESULTS BY 21% 21% Top Missing Skills in Mid-Level Leaders 1. Coaching 2. Performance Appraisal​ 3. Developing Others ​ 4. Managing Change​ 5. Communications​ 6. Business Acumen SOURCE: Bersin by Deloitte
  23. 23. • Is specific and targeted • Includes both positive reinforcement and constructive criticism • Regular--you must stick to consistent check-ins to make sure employees are on track with their development. Meaningful feedback: “Employees who receive daily feedback from their managers are 3x more likely to be engaged than those who give feedback once a year or less” “When managers provide meaningful feedback to employees, those employees are 3.5x more likely to be engaged”
  24. 24. Professionalism Interpersonal Work Ethic Appearance Communication skills 33.6% 27.3% 25.3% 24.9%
  25. 25. Work Ethic 1. Start with your body – treat it right 2. Eliminate as many distractions as possible 3. Measure your ethic against others 4. Set your own standard of excellence 5. Be dependable 6. Start your day strong and get to work on time 7. Don’t let mistakes ruin your progress
  26. 26. Appearance “Dress for the new position you have.”
  27. 27. New Manager Curriculum
  28. 28. Optimal Learning Online Training Receiving Feedback Self Awareness On-the-Job Experiences
  29. 29. What are my development objectives? What activities do I need to undertake to achieve my objectives? What support/resources do I need to achieve my objectives What are the measures of success? Target date for achieving my objectives Create an Individual Development Plan
  30. 30. Succession Planning for New Managers CONSIDERATION EXPLORATION TRANSITION ADOPTION • Seminars • Informational interviews • Job shadowing • Focus groups Selection • Formal and informal training • Acting manager • Job rotation • Project manager • Formal and informal training • Mentoring • Networking • Formal and informal training • Mentoring • Feedback • Peer evaluation Roles and Responsibilities Processes and Procedures Professional Identity Information PRE-PROMOTION POST-PROMOTION SOURCE: A Succession Plan for First Time Managers, Maria Plakhotnik and Tonette S. Rocco, T&D Magazine
  31. 31. Key Takeaways • Identify key strengths and improve weaknesses of first-time managers • Using the essential skills of a new manager, including emotional intelligence, feedback and coaching techniques to improve new manager and employee relationships • Create training and succession plans that builds confidence and increases productivity for your new managers
  32. 32. Questions?
  33. 33. Using Emotional Intelligence Video Series This eight-lesson video course covers the major components of EI: self-awareness, self-regulation, social awareness, and relationship management. Emotional Intelligence
  34. 34. Management Essentials: Receive Feedback From Your Employees This course will help solicit and receive feedback from your direct reports. Not all managers ask their employees for feedback. Take the opportunity to distinguish yourself as a great leader and boss, by asking your employees to share what you can do better to lead and manage others Receive Feedback From Your Employees
  35. 35. Thank you for attending! Katie Miller Marketing Specialist BizLibrary Libby Mullen Learning & Development Manager BizLibrary

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