Presented	
  by	
  
Alec	
  Klein	
  
Professor,	
  Medill	
  School	
  of	
  Journalism	
  
Northwestern	
  University	
 ...
About	
  Me	
  
Northwestern	
  
University	
  
Professor	
  Alec	
  Klein	
  
is	
  an	
  award-­‐winning	
  
investigati...
¡  Father:	
  editor-­‐in-­‐chief,	
  New	
  York	
  Times	
  
magazine	
  
¡  Busy	
  guy	
  
¡  Decided	
  to	
  writ...
¡  Came	
  home	
  from	
  reporting	
  the	
  story	
  
¡  Wrote	
  draft	
  of	
  story,	
  showed	
  to	
  father	
  ...
¡  Did	
  you	
  interview	
  the	
  police?	
  
¡  Homework	
  
¡  Subway	
  on	
  a	
  school	
  night	
  
¡  Police...
¡  Father	
  flipped	
  through	
  notes.	
  
¡  Miraculously,	
  found	
  a	
  quote	
  from	
  a	
  school	
  
security...
¡  Father	
  edited	
  my	
  story.	
  
¡  Translation:	
  He	
  rewrote	
  it.	
  
¡  Lede:	
  “In	
  the	
  worst	
  ...
Finding	
  and	
  pitching	
  your	
  best	
  investigative	
  business	
  story	
  
To	
  begin	
  with,	
  you	
  need	
  PHOAM	
  
	
  
¡  P:assion	
  
¡  H:ook	
  
¡  O:riginality	
  
¡  A:ccess	
  
...
¡  They	
  usually	
  come	
  from	
  beats.	
  
¡  That’s	
  because	
  they’re	
  organic.	
  They	
  arise	
  
natura...
¡  This	
  is	
  not	
  the	
  same	
  thing	
  as	
  a	
  preconceived	
  
notion.	
  
¡  Rather:	
  Consider	
  a	
  s...
¡  Let’s	
  say	
  you	
  think	
  you’ve	
  hit	
  on	
  a	
  	
  
great	
  idea.	
  
¡  How	
  do	
  you	
  check	
  i...
But	
  who	
  has	
  time	
  to	
  pursue	
  
investigative	
  business	
  stories,	
  
especially	
  when	
  you’re	
  on...
¡  Get	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  office:	
  kill	
  or	
  be	
  killed.	
  
¡  Cub	
  reporter:	
  worked	
  on	
  vacations—...
¡  Darwinian	
  approach:	
  only	
  the	
  fittest	
  will	
  
get	
  on	
  Page	
  One	
  
¡  In	
  the	
  old	
  days:...
¡  Such	
  as:	
  I’d	
  like	
  to	
  do	
  an	
  investigation	
  of	
  
poverty	
  
¡  Many	
  a	
  times:	
  Bludgeo...
¡  About	
  20	
  percent	
  
¡  That’s	
  enough	
  to	
  tell	
  you	
  if	
  you’ve	
  got	
  a	
  story	
  
or	
  wh...
¡  Mistake:	
  Never	
  show	
  editors	
  your	
  
raw	
  notes.	
  
¡  Made	
  that	
  mistake	
  on	
  AOL	
  
¡  Ed...
¡  Then	
  Enron	
  happened	
  
¡  Editors:	
  What	
  was	
  Alec	
  working	
  on?	
  
¡  This	
  time:	
  I	
  wrot...
¡  Having	
  a	
  year	
  to	
  do	
  an	
  investigative	
  business	
  
story	
  sounds	
  better	
  than	
  it	
  is.	...
¡  Back	
  to	
  the	
  memo	
  
¡  It	
  clarifies	
  the	
  issues.	
  It	
  
makes	
  editors	
  see.	
  They	
  
can	...
¡  Let’s	
  say	
  your	
  editors	
  still	
  say	
  no.	
  
¡  Then	
  what?	
  
¡  Set	
  your	
  own	
  agenda.	
  
¡  The	
  old	
  model:	
  the	
  three-­‐part	
  series	
  that	
  took	
  a	
  
year	
  to	
  report	
  and	
  runs	
  ...
¡  Build	
  on	
  your	
  beat	
  coverage.	
  
¡  Think	
  this	
  way:	
  once	
  a	
  month,	
  
craft	
  a	
  great	...
¡  The	
  Las	
  Vegas	
  Sun,	
  most	
  notably	
  including	
  the	
  reporting	
  of	
  
Alexandra	
  Berzon,	
  won	...
¡ Please	
  feel	
  free	
  to	
  contact	
  me	
  at	
  
alecklein@gmail.com.	
  
	
  
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Investigative Business Journalism - Finding and Pitching Ideas by Alec Klein

863 views

Published on

Alec Klein, an award-winning investigative journalist and Northwestern University professor, presents tips for finding investigative story angles and pitching those story ideas during the free, full-day workshop, "Finding Your Best Investigative Business Story."

This training event was hosted by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism and the the SPJ Madison Pro Chapter at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Sept. 28, 2013.

For more information about free training for business journalists, please visit http://businessjournalism.org.

For more tips on how to develop investigative business journalism stories, please visit http://bit.ly/investigativebiz2013.

Published in: Career, News & Politics, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
863
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Investigative Business Journalism - Finding and Pitching Ideas by Alec Klein

  1. 1. Presented  by   Alec  Klein   Professor,  Medill  School  of  Journalism   Northwestern  University   Madison,  Wis.,  Sept.  28,  2013  
  2. 2. About  Me   Northwestern   University   Professor  Alec  Klein   is  an  award-­‐winning   investigative   business  journalist   and  best-­‐selling   author,  formerly  of     The  Washington   Post  and  Wall   Street  Journal.    
  3. 3. ¡  Father:  editor-­‐in-­‐chief,  New  York  Times   magazine   ¡  Busy  guy   ¡  Decided  to  write  for  high  school  paper   ¡  Assigned  to  cover    run-­‐of-­‐the-­‐mill  burglary    
  4. 4. ¡  Came  home  from  reporting  the  story   ¡  Wrote  draft  of  story,  showed  to  father   ¡  “This  is  terrible.”   ¡  Did  you  call  the  school?   ¡  Phone  book:  Mrs.  Berman  at  home  
  5. 5. ¡  Did  you  interview  the  police?   ¡  Homework   ¡  Subway  on  a  school  night   ¡  Police  station  
  6. 6. ¡  Father  flipped  through  notes.   ¡  Miraculously,  found  a  quote  from  a  school   security  guard   ¡  “Worst  thing  ever  saw”   ¡  Another  miracle:  Had  noted  she  had  worked   at  school  for  nearly  25  years  
  7. 7. ¡  Father  edited  my  story.   ¡  Translation:  He  rewrote  it.   ¡  Lede:  “In  the  worst  breakout  of  burglary  in   nearly  a  quarter  century…   ¡  Page  1   ¡  Hooked  
  8. 8. Finding  and  pitching  your  best  investigative  business  story  
  9. 9. To  begin  with,  you  need  PHOAM     ¡  P:assion   ¡  H:ook   ¡  O:riginality   ¡  A:ccess   ¡  M:arket   Image  by  flickr  user  marttj  
  10. 10. ¡  They  usually  come  from  beats.   ¡  That’s  because  they’re  organic.  They  arise   naturally  in  the  course  of  reporting.   ¡  To  wit:  Secret  bonuses  at  City  Hall   ¡  The  anonymous  tipster  on  AOL     Image  by  flickr  user  MonkeyMike  
  11. 11. ¡  This  is  not  the  same  thing  as  a  preconceived   notion.   ¡  Rather:  Consider  a  set  of  questions  that  need   answering.   ¡  To  wit:  When  cigarettes  are  under  attack,  why   are  cigars  being  glamorized?  (Yachting   magazine)  
  12. 12. ¡  Let’s  say  you  think  you’ve  hit  on  a     great  idea.   ¡  How  do  you  check  it  out  to     make  sure  it’s  uncharted  territory?     ¡  Lexis-­‐Nexis   ¡  Amazon   ¡  Google     ¡  The  overriding  question:  Has  it  been  done   before?  
  13. 13. But  who  has  time  to  pursue   investigative  business  stories,   especially  when  you’re  on  a   busy  beat  and  your  editor  is   breathing  down  your  neck  to   file  early  and  often?      
  14. 14. ¡  Get  out  of  the  office:  kill  or  be  killed.   ¡  Cub  reporter:  worked  on  vacations—only  time  the   editors  couldn’t  assign  stories   ¡  Worked  on  weekends   ¡  Worked  after  hours,  after  the  proverbial  smoke   cleared  from  the  daily  deadlines   ¡  Bottom-­‐line:  find  time  
  15. 15. ¡  Darwinian  approach:  only  the  fittest  will   get  on  Page  One   ¡  In  the  old  days:  Only  three  stories  on   Page  One   ¡  Lot  of  reporters,  few  A1  slots   ¡  Mistake:  Walk  into  your  editor’s  office   with  an  ill-­‐conceived  idea.  
  16. 16. ¡  Such  as:  I’d  like  to  do  an  investigation  of   poverty   ¡  Many  a  times:  Bludgeoned  in  editor’s   office   ¡  Finally  figured  out:  Need  to  do  some   research  before  entering  the  torture   chamber   ¡  But  how  much  research?  
  17. 17. ¡  About  20  percent   ¡  That’s  enough  to  tell  you  if  you’ve  got  a  story   or  whether  you’re  going  to  spin  your  wheels.   ¡  The  20  percent  solution:   §  What’s  the  story?   §  A  new  trend?       §  A  twist  on  an  old  idea?   §  How  will  you  report  it,  and  how  long  will  it  take?  
  18. 18. ¡  Mistake:  Never  show  editors  your   raw  notes.   ¡  Made  that  mistake  on  AOL   ¡  Editor:  Don’t  get  it,  nothing  here.   Go  back  to  work.  
  19. 19. ¡  Then  Enron  happened   ¡  Editors:  What  was  Alec  working  on?   ¡  This  time:  I  wrote  a  memo   ¡  Set  free  for  a  year  
  20. 20. ¡  Having  a  year  to  do  an  investigative  business   story  sounds  better  than  it  is.   ¡  You  better  come  up  with  a  great  piece.   ¡  Can  you  withstand  making  no  progress  for   several  weeks  at  a  time?   §  Maybe  inbred  
  21. 21. ¡  Back  to  the  memo   ¡  It  clarifies  the  issues.  It   makes  editors  see.  They   can  print  it.  They  can   ruminate  over  it.  They  can   forward  it  by  email  to  their   bosses.  Then,  they  can   approve  it.  
  22. 22. ¡  Let’s  say  your  editors  still  say  no.   ¡  Then  what?   ¡  Set  your  own  agenda.  
  23. 23. ¡  The  old  model:  the  three-­‐part  series  that  took  a   year  to  report  and  runs  in  December  in  time  for   the  Pulitzer  entries   ¡  The  new  model:  write  episodically.   ¡  WSJ  did  this:  Word  was  sent  out  at  the  beginning   of  the  year—let’s  write  about  death.   ¡  The  episodic  approach,  it’s  the  way  of  the  world:   the  economy,  the  industry.  Investigative   reporting  is  expensive.  
  24. 24. ¡  Build  on  your  beat  coverage.   ¡  Think  this  way:  once  a  month,   craft  a  great  piece  of   investigative  reporting  on  the   same  subject.   ¡  Over  a  year,  you’ll  end  up  with  12   pieces  that  amount  to  a  worthy   in-­‐depth  investigation  into  a   single  topic.  
  25. 25. ¡  The  Las  Vegas  Sun,  most  notably  including  the  reporting  of   Alexandra  Berzon,  won  the  2009  Pulitzer  Prize  for  public  service,   for  a  series  of  stories  about  the  high  death  rate  of  construction   workers  on  the  Las  Vegas  strip.   ¡  Steve  Fainaru  of  The  Washington  Post,  2008,    for  international  reporting,  for  his  episodic      stories  about  private  security  contractors   ¡  Kevin  Helliker  and  Thomas  M.  Burton  of  The      Wall  Street  Journal,  2004,  explanatory                reporting,  for  their  episodic  stories        about  aneurysms    
  26. 26. ¡ Please  feel  free  to  contact  me  at   alecklein@gmail.com.    

×