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A project in partnership with:
Sykehjemsetaten
Oslo Kommune
Line T. Bogen, Rickard Jensen, Liz LeBlanc, Simon Søgnen Tveit...
INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 2
What we learned 	 26
Workshop 1 at Solvang	 18
Workshop 2 at AHO 	 20
WORKSHOPS		 17
Employee co...
3
4INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
INTERVIEWS
BESTILLERKONTORET
5INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
10 SEPTEMBER BYDEL ALNA
MARIT
1. Always evaluating patients’needs in person
2. ...
6INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
11 SEPTEMBER BYDEL GRORUD
BENTE
1. Nothing is standard. Each bydel decides who gets
what care by ...
7INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
12 SEPTEMBER
BJØRN & BENTE
1. Patients get better care at home (even
research says so)
2. Still n...
8INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
23 SEPTEMBER
TERESA
1. There has been an increase in patients, a
bigger turnover and more work in...
9INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
3 OCTOBER
KRYSTYNA
1. Bestillerkontoret visits and evaluates every 2
weeks
2. Normal stay at a sh...
10INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
GENERAL
INSIGHTS
11INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
EMPLOYEE CONCERNS ABOUT THE MOVE
1. Short term staff are more open for change
than long term. Th...
12INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
HOSPITAL
1. Within the first 24 hours from admittance,
the hospital has to notify the municipali...
13INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
1. There are incredible differences in the
patient population from bydel to bydel. Alna
has a mi...
14INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
HOME HELP SERVICES
1. Working in the home help system
sometimes can be dangerous. Patients
can b...
15INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
HELSEHUS
1. One of the goals for the Helse Hus
patients is no re-admittance to the hospital.
2. ...
16INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
BESTILLERKONTORET &
STRUCTURE
1. It’s difficult to get things done because
people have so many i...
17INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
BESTILLERKONTORET & STRUCTURE
debate. There is no journal that can follow
the patient, causing b...
18INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
WORKSHOPS
INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 19
30 OCTOBER SOLVANG SYKEHJEM
WORKSHOP 1
INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 20
When becoming a health house the institute
will be needing more doctors. In the process
of hiri...
INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 21
1. Most of the participants pointed out the
issue of moving patients, how that is both
the bigg...
INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 22
AHO WORKSHOP
INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 23
AHO WORKSHOP
INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 24
PAGE CONTINUED
8. There is an urgent need for better
documentation systems that talk to each
ot...
25
26INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14
PROTOTYPING
INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 27
FROM INSIGHT TO
DEVELOPMENT
In the brief from SYE they expressed a need for
making their projec...
INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 28
PROTOTYPING THE TOOL
2
ON THE
SAME PAGE
Insights Book
Sykehjemsetaten
Oslo Kommune
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ON THE SAME PAGE insights book

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ON THE SAME PAGE was a 2014 master studio project at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design in collaboration with and serving Sykehjemsetaten, the directorate for elderly homes in Oslo.

Students: Line T. Bogen, Rickard Jensen, Liz LeBlanc, Simon Søgnen Tveit.

Published in: Design
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ON THE SAME PAGE insights book

  1. 1. A project in partnership with: Sykehjemsetaten Oslo Kommune Line T. Bogen, Rickard Jensen, Liz LeBlanc, Simon Søgnen Tveit Systems Oriented Design Fall 2014 ON THE SAME PAGEInsights Book
  2. 2. INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 2 What we learned 26 Workshop 1 at Solvang 18 Workshop 2 at AHO 20 WORKSHOPS 17 Employee concerns 10 Helsehus 14 Bestillerkontoret & structure 15 Hospital 11 Difference between districts 12 Home care services 13 GENERAL INSIGHTS 9 PROTOTYPING 25 Bestillerkontoret 4 Home care services 5 AHUS 6 Solvang sykehjem 7 Lilleborg sykehjem 8 INTERVIEWS 3 We’ve categorized these insights according to the actor or organization that is most relevant. We hope this makes them easier to grasp rather than chronological ordering according to when we discovered this information. INSIGHTS TABLE OF CONTENTS
  3. 3. 3
  4. 4. 4INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 INTERVIEWS
  5. 5. BESTILLERKONTORET 5INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 10 SEPTEMBER BYDEL ALNA MARIT 1. Always evaluating patients’needs in person 2. Patient has a choice over long term location 3. They don’t care about neighbors staying next to each other in the long term home. 4. Helse hus is not a spa, it’s an efficient extension of the hospital 5. Private home care has less bickering. They do only what is ordered. 6. They now have twice as many gates to check on people at the hospital and at the helse hus 7. They always use all the rooms 8. They have to prepay for rooms every three months and estimate what they will need
  6. 6. 6INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 11 SEPTEMBER BYDEL GRORUD BENTE 1. Nothing is standard. Each bydel decides who gets what care by whom 2. Communication is stronger and more open here. 3. Evaluation meeting is not enough time to give accurate vedtak 4. Opinion of private/public varies by district and demographic 5. Amount of public housing has huge impact 6. Many have been working 20- 25 years 7. Different employees have different strengths. Holistic view, or get it done 8. Hospitals, family, and politicians want more room in the nursing home. Patients and districts want them to be cared for at home 9. If you haven’t worked in home care, impressions aren’t great. 10. Miscommunication is an epidemic 11. Want primary person for each patient. But sometimes that’s not what the patient wants, or it’s dangerous, or it’s impossible with 24hr care 12. It’s easy to think things are going well but they only see employees a few times per day 13. Technology is working, they work with device to control HJEMMETJENESTE
  7. 7. 7INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 12 SEPTEMBER BJØRN & BENTE 1. Patients get better care at home (even research says so) 2. Still not ideal communication between Ahus and bestillerkontoret 3. Positive reaction to changes. It gives common communication. 4. Reform about increasing collaboration so patients get the best care 5. GP’s are gatekeepers who don’t see the whole picture 6. 2012 effect- hospital is empty AHUS
  8. 8. 8INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 23 SEPTEMBER TERESA 1. There has been an increase in patients, a bigger turnover and more work in general for nursing homes after samhandlingsreformen. 2. Becoming a health house requires a higher number of full time employees, yet the number of beds remains the same. 3. About 90 % of the current employees at Solvang will be moved to other nursing homes as a direct consequence of competence following the patients. 4. There will be no unskilled nurses at health houses. 5. Personal information concerning the patient, such as eating and sleeping habits are included in the reports in the Gerica journal. 6. Restructuring Solvang, all long term patients are given the choice of either moving internally to a different ward, or to another nursing home. The majority chooses to stay at Solvang. SOLVANG SYKEHJEM
  9. 9. 9INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 3 OCTOBER KRYSTYNA 1. Bestillerkontoret visits and evaluates every 2 weeks 2. Normal stay at a short term facility is 2-3 weeks 3. Patients with dementia can seem calm and balanced in hospital, but act out in nursing home. 4. First evaluation of patient consists of a cross disciplinary team. 5. Regular meetings for special case patients include Bestillerkontor, patient, next of kin and a representative from the nursing home 6. Some patients have scheduled visits allowing them stay for instance two weeks in a nursing home followed by four weeks at home. HONEY 1. A long term nurse can stay at a health house if that nurse acquires the necessary competence 2. There is unclarity as to what competence is needed for short term vs long term patients. 3. The potential possibility of staying at your facility renders the nurse passive as to whether or not to apply other places. 4. Practical elements that change when switching workplace, such as proximity to home or kindergarten, play a smaller role than losing colleagues and patient relations. LILLEBORG SYKEHJEM
  10. 10. 10INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 GENERAL INSIGHTS
  11. 11. 11INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 EMPLOYEE CONCERNS ABOUT THE MOVE 1. Short term staff are more open for change than long term. The special competence of the employees will follow the medical needs of the patients. 2. Employees are concerned about maintaining the quality of the service they are providing for the patients, as they start moving staff and employees around. 3. Some are the“get it done”type, others are more holistic, short term patients need their care takers to balance both mind sets. 4. The institution leaders have invested a lot in putting together people and establishing internal routines for their place so it´s emotional to start sending them away and ripping up all the work they’ve put in.
  12. 12. 12INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 HOSPITAL 1. Within the first 24 hours from admittance, the hospital has to notify the municipality that they have a patient that may need more care after discharge. 2. At the hospital, they have a lot of agreements that are used as a tool for cooperation. Agreements on who is responsible for what, so there is less confusion. 3. Teams of nurses that go out in ambulances. They can follow up on practical nurse missions and train the home nurses to care for the patient. 4. Prior to the reform in 2012, patients stayed longer in hospital, now they are sent home and need recovery while finished medication. 5. 24 hours after reforms took place, hospital was completely empty. 6. If the district is full, they hospital will of course take care of the patient, but it is incredibly expensive. First extra night in hospital can cost 40000 NOK.
  13. 13. 13INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 1. There are incredible differences in the patient population from bydel to bydel. Alna has a mixed population, 200 nationalities, huge cultural differences. 2. May elderly in Grorud have no social network, never kept a job, poor living conditions, average age 67 years old. 3. Frogner has social support structure, average age 84 4. West side has a lot more complaints, some times from family members, even though there are more resources. East side has less complaints. Take what they can get. DIFFERENCES ACROSS OSLO 5. Security issues make it harder to get people to work after dark at Grorud, stepping over people sleeping in the hallways. 6. Nothing is standard, each district can decide for themselves what they want to do. This creates ownership, but also can mean patients don’t receive the same quality of care. 7.  Private/public opinion varies from district to district and which side of the city. Availability of public housing has an impact on perception.
  14. 14. 14INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 HOME HELP SERVICES 1. Working in the home help system sometimes can be dangerous. Patients can be aggressive, racist, etc. Can be really overbearing on the help. 2. The day is broken into 3 shifts: day, evening, night shift. This drops to 1/3 the staff on the weekend. 3. Very open to technology, they have GPS system for employees to make sure they are not stuck somewhere. 4.  Employees can go out in teams. Park the car somewhere central. And go out together. 5. Great system, morning shift, come back and eat lunch together, talk about patients. Give feedback. If there’s a problem, they always send a second person to make sure something is really happening (not just that the patient was having a bad day, etc) 6. Goals: would like to have one primary care taker, but not always needed. Some patients like a lot different people to talk to. It’s a matter of personal preference. They may also prefer a different employee, or have a preference on the gender of their care taker. 7. They have an ongoing agreement with security company to accompany them to unruly patients. 8. Physical challenges in homes: getting in and out of shower. High threshold in the doors, not flat. Is there an elevator? Is the bed too tall? Wheelchairs getting through doors. Can the nurse help the patient in that type of bed? It can take up to two weeks to order specialized equipment. 9. If you can’t walk up stairs, and there is no elevator, that is not enough reason to get into a long term home. 10. 15 hours a week at home care. Anything more than that, it’s cheaper to go into long term care. But spaces are not necessarily available. 11. Many nurses in home health have been there for 20-25 years. Newer ones leave quickly. But those who have been in hospital or other experience tend to do very well. 12. Sometimes hard to get an overview of what is happening because you don’t see into the people’s houses. Not like a hospital. 13. A vedtak can just be a call to check in with the patient, or visits to the home every 3 hours. 14.  Friday afternoon: Bestillerkontoret often calls last minute and has them arrange something.
  15. 15. 15INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 HELSEHUS 1. One of the goals for the Helse Hus patients is no re-admittance to the hospital. 2. The Helsehus should be as an extension of the hospital. Sterile & efficient, shouldn’t be too“comfortable”, hindering the flow of people. 3. Short term patients can stay two in a room while long term need their own room. However, there is not always space to put two beds in one room, which can complicate the precalculated moving plan. 4. Employees working in the Helsehus have to know when to“sit on their hands”, so that the patients do as much as possible by themselves. This is to prevent the patients from becoming apathetic and dependent after a long period in an institution. 5. Beds should be organized according to medical needs and not according to city districts. 6. Short term patients in general needs a higher“care level”. Solvang for example, is going to have the same number of beds but they will need a higher number of FTE´s. Patients are still in treatment when they leave the hospital. They may have IV’s, feeding tubes, etc. More care is now typically needed. 7. Short/long-term isn’t an accurate description of the patients, only how long they might need the bed and not about their needs. An UDI patient and a rehab- patient are both short-term patients, but the first can have no hopes of being independent while the second has a clear focus on getting better. 8. It has been decided upon that the name `Helsehus´ can only be used for this institution. (This hasn´t happened for `Mitt hjem´ which is still not totally certain that it´ll be chosen as the name for what will be the long term nursing home). 9. Employees at the Helsehus needs to be pragmatic when caring for someone that just needs to be as comfortable as possible. They need to focus on motivating the patients to get better. 10. There´s a greater need for medical equipment when becoming a Helsehus, but the costs for that comes out of the pocket of the individual Helsehus. The need is greater due to the shortened time at the hospital and patients with unfinished treatment. TRADEMARK
  16. 16. 16INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 BESTILLERKONTORET & STRUCTURE 1. It’s difficult to get things done because people have so many interfering obligations. They want to make improvements, but are too busy doing their job. 2. Each districts orders a block of the beds they will need once a year. They have the opportunity to adjust the order every three months. They can of course“buy”additional beds“outside the block”but they are much more expensive. 3. The patient can often get mixed messages, especially from doctors and case workers from BK. The reason for this might be that the doctor sees the person at his/her worst and then the case worker comes in a bit later when the patients condition seems a bit better. Also the doctor is not always aware of the different service offerings the case workers from different city districts has to offer. 4. There are problems with the logistics concerning beds. Patients get moved around because they are not in the bed their bydel is renting or because there´s a cheaper bed opening up somewhere. 5. If a patient’s health situation changes and they need a different kind of care, the decision is made by the city district they come from. The bestillerkontoret acts as a gatekeeper. This means that two patients with the same needs in the same institution could get different treatment. This has to do with what the case workers from BK have in terms of resources to distribute and how they evaluate the patients needs. They might also have different routines when it comes to evaluation of the patients from their district. 6. The detailed level of preferences concerning the patients care (what they eat, when they eat, what time they like to go out of bed, etc.) are documented in a system within each of the nursing homes. This information is not passed on if a patient moves from one nursing home to the next. 7.  The patient journal is constantly under
  17. 17. 17INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 BESTILLERKONTORET & STRUCTURE debate. There is no journal that can follow the patient, causing big problems for both them and the different institutions they meets. It means starting from scratch with every patient, which costs a lot of time and money. 9. Samhandlings is really about sliding between tasks and strengthening the competence in the municipalities. A lot of things can be done outside the hospital. 10. Bottleneck at the hospital, it’s the district that decides what the patient needs. The doctors in the hospital may tell the patient something different. It causes a lot of confusion and distrust for the patient and their family.
  18. 18. 18INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 WORKSHOPS
  19. 19. INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 19 30 OCTOBER SOLVANG SYKEHJEM WORKSHOP 1
  20. 20. INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 20 When becoming a health house the institute will be needing more doctors. In the process of hiring these, one institute used role playing in the interview to get a better feel of the human aspect of the position. This is something new and the process was quickly shared with the other institutes. 2. The involved parties are quick to adapt to new situations and get on top of things such as more FTEs, new positions and limited time. 3. There is little or no consensus across the levels as to what the health house will be, and the involved parties have a pressing need to vent any unclarities. SOLVANG WORKSHOP We were able to take over a meeting SYE hade planned in order to discuss progress in the transition to health houses. The meeting was originally two and a half hours long but ended up being split up into a half- hour meeting followed by our two hour workshop. At one point, one of the institute leaders classified themselves as a“40% health house”while in reality she meant they are now at 40% short term patients. 1. Those involved in this transition are not aware of the fact that a health house is not the same as a short term facility, nor are they aware of the length of the transition process and what it entails. The health house is not yet defined.
  21. 21. INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 21 1. Most of the participants pointed out the issue of moving patients, how that is both the biggest weakness in the system and the point where the patient would feel the least taken care of. 2. Communication is key. The situations where communication flow is satisfactory and the patient course is well planned lead to the employee feeling more in control of the situation and the patient feels safe. 3. The patient feels safest at home and/or with the appropriate services, and least safe if his/her situation is unclear. 4. Inadequate flow of information or communication robs the employees of feeling in control. 5. There is an urgent need for better interaction and collaboration around the patient, and for getting all partners on board right away. 6. Economy is insufficient. It’s difficult to cover all patient’s needs with the resources available. 7. The best level of care is not necessarily lowest level. 8. Transparency. Making more information available could increase patient security in dire situations. WORKSHOP 2 5 NOVEMBER AHO
  22. 22. INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 22 AHO WORKSHOP
  23. 23. INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 23 AHO WORKSHOP
  24. 24. INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 24 PAGE CONTINUED 8. There is an urgent need for better documentation systems that talk to each other better, or one single electronic system that follows the patient. This technology should be used systematically for follow-ups and monitoring, ensuring a focused and targeted stay. 9. Each stopover in the patient journey demands a lot of resources. Finding the right level of care the first time around, or as early as possible, would facilitate making direct transitions between institutions. This could speed up the patient journey and reduce the number of stopovers. 10. Strengthening home services for patients with dementia would reduce short term admittances. 11. It is challenging to give the user the correct services based on needs and wishes according to the district’s economy and regulations. 12. Introducing one single contact person for each patient and all actors around him/ her, could create a more coherent patient journey, reduce the feeling of insecurity across multiple levels and give the patients a greater sense of being included in their own course of events. 1. Patient journeys need to be standardized and seen holistically. Focusing on a single task instead of the end goal results in confusion and insecurity. 2. There are too many actors involved and too much individual problem handling. Not enough familiarity with the roles of other services and insufficient focus on collaborating across institutions. Better interaction and multi disciplinary meetings would lead to better coordinated services and higher level of transparency concerning the course of each patient. 3. Substance abuse patients need better and more easily accessible housing facilities. 4. The competence in hospitals is too specialized which could be a problem. Generalized competence will allow the hospital to make more qualified decisions about the patient journey and could help reduce the number of moves. 5. Improving the system for receiving physical aids would free up more beds. 6. There are some gaps between the different services offered, leaving some patients in between two services either getting too much or too little help. The services need to be adjustable and adaptable to each patient. 7. Invest more resources in preventive work, enabling the patient to stay at home, and out of institutions for as long as possible.
  25. 25. 25
  26. 26. 26INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 PROTOTYPING
  27. 27. INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 27 FROM INSIGHT TO DEVELOPMENT In the brief from SYE they expressed a need for making their project more visual, in a way that they could easier explain it to others, such as the leaders of nursing homes involved and politicians. While sitting in on a meeting, we started visualizing their conversation. We were barely beginning to understand what caused the most of the confusion and time consuming discussions in these meetings. As everybody in the meetings was following their own notes in their own books they tended to misunderstand and talk passed each other when discussing number of patients, employees, FTE’s, etc. We realized that if we could facilitate their discussion by illustrating it, we could save time, confusion and frustration. Not only did the project leaders at SYE have problems communicating and explaining the project outside of the project group, they also had some problems communicating between themselves in their own meetings. So, with a systems oriented design approach, we made a timeline and the structure of the nursing homes (in the map we call MAP 6), while Wenche, leader at Ryen and Bente had the first meeting where they planned the structuring of departments at Ryen. Instantly Wenche and Bente lifted their eyes from their notes and started pointing to the common sheet, where they both could follow each other’s trains of thought. The common worksheet eliminated all confusion around what numbers, floors, which house or what patients were being discussed. WHAT WE LEARNED PROTOTYPING THE TOOL
  28. 28. INSIGHT BOOK //08.12.14 28 PROTOTYPING THE TOOL
  29. 29. 2 ON THE SAME PAGE Insights Book Sykehjemsetaten Oslo Kommune

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