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We Manage What We Measure: An Agrobiodiversity Index to Help Deliver SDGs

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Presentation delivered by M. Ann Tutwiler at the International Agrobiodiversity Congress 2016, held in Delhi, India, 6-9 November.

The presentation outlined a new Agrobiodiversity Index that will enable governments, private sector and other decision-makers to assess and track agrobiodiversity in food systems. Currently there is no consistent way to do this.

Find out more about the India Agrobiodiversity Congress:
http://www.bioversityinternational.org/iac2016/

IAC 2016 gathered 850 delegates from over 40 countries across the world who presented the results and stories of progress of agrobiodiversity research they are involved in.

Published in: Science
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We Manage What We Measure: An Agrobiodiversity Index to Help Deliver SDGs

  1. 1. We Manage What We Measure: an Agrobiodiversity Index to Help Deliver the Sustainable Development Goals M. Ann Tutwiler, Director General, Bioversity International International Agrobiodiversity Congress, New Delhi, India 6 November 2016 #IAC_2016 @AnnTutwiler Photo:KrishnasisGhosh
  2. 2. The 20th Century Challenge Over the past century, farmers and breeders have used genetic diversity to breed high-yielding varieties. The Green Revolution brought new varieties and production methods to developing countries, with significant results. FAO Save and Grow, 2011 FAO Save and Grow, 2011
  3. 3. Cost 1: Planetary Boundaries are Exceeded Steffen et al., 2016
  4. 4. Cost 2: Global Malnutrition Once considered a high income problem, overweight and obesity are on the rise in low and middle-income countries, especially in urban settings. At the same time, 1 billion people suffer from ‘hidden hunger’.
  5. 5. Cost 3: Production Systems Losing Diversity Data source: RBG Kew, 2016; FAO, 1997 3 12
  6. 6. 21st Century Goals More Complex and Interconnected
  7. 7. If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got! Food systems are a critical agent of a world transition to global sustainability: • Diverse highly nutritious and resilient species and varieties integrated into our diets and value chains. • Diverse, highly nutritious and resilient varieties and species integrated into our food production systems. Credit:BioversityInternational/S.MannCredit:BioversityInternational/Y.Morimoto
  8. 8. The Old Model Yield per hectare Sufficiency in dietary energy Proportion of children receiving a vitamin A capsule Number of accessions in genebanks Photos: Flickr/G. San Martin, Moss; CIAT/N. Palmer, CIFOR/R. Martin Quantity of seed produced’ or ‘seed replacement rates’
  9. 9. Nutritious & diverse diets Productive, low-input and resilient farms and landscapes Farmers’ access to quality, diverse seeds Conservation of agrobiodiversity for future options and today’s needs New Improved Model Photos: Bioversity International/A. Camacho, P.Lepoint, A. Sidhu, N.Capozio
  10. 10. We Need New Metrics! A consistent long-term monitoring system for agrobiodiversity to be applied across four sustainable food system components: Nutritious, diverse diets Productive and resilient farms and landscapes Farmers’ access to quality, diverse seeds Conservation of agrobiodiversity for future options Photos: Bioversity International/A. Camacho, P.Lepoint, A. Sidhu, N.Capozio
  11. 11. Counting More Than Calories – Nutritional Yield
  12. 12. What are the Linkages Between Producing and Consuming Agricultural Biodiversity? Photo: Kenyan farmer in her home garden. Credit: E. Demartis
  13. 13. Links Between Nutrition and Production Systems Source: Kehlenbeck K, McMullin S. 2015. Fruit tree portfolios for improved diets and nutrition in Machakos County, Kenya. ICRAF
  14. 14. Supportive Policies are Essential Example - Millets in India Nutritious & drought resistant millets once part of traditional diets. Working with partners for 15 years to promote millet use resulting in: • 2013 India’s food security act adds millets into public distribution system • Millets on menu in restaurants, sold on streets • Inclusion of millets in school lunches in 12 districts in Central & Southern India. Photos: The Hindu newspaper clipping; Minor millet products. Credit: Bioversity International/S. Padulosi
  15. 15. The Links Between Resilient, Productive Farms and Biodiversity – Not Just Yield of Commodities Photo: Ecosystem services in a rice system in Java. Credit: CIFOR/A. Erlangga
  16. 16. ↑ Soil stability ↓ Soil erosion Agricultural biodiversity and complex vegetation structure Soil structure Diversity at Field and Farm Level ↑ Ecosystem services Above-ground biodiversity + Below-ground biodiversity Soil function and nutrient cycling
  17. 17. Diversity in Landscapes Stops Pests in Their Tracks Photos: Coffee landscape and damage of a coffee borer beetle. Credit: Bioversity Internationl/F. De Clerck and C. Zanzanaini
  18. 18. Genetic Diversity in Beans in Uganda Reduces Food LossesHouseholdweighteddamageindexWDI Number of varieties grown per household Angular Leave Spot Anthracnose Number of varieties grown per household Photo:Researchersanalyzedamageonbeanplants.Credit:BioversityInternational/P.deSantis
  19. 19. How Seed Systems Contribute to Diversity • Innovation • Seed production and distribution • Regulation • Seed access support • Conservation Photo: Women in a seedbank, India. Credit: Bioversity International/P. Bordoni
  20. 20. Seed Systems and Diversity - How Innovation Drives Diversity in Food Systems Photo: Farmers score wheat varieties according to their preferred phenotypical traits in a field trail in Northern Ethiopia. Credit: Bioversity Internationl/J. van de Gevel
  21. 21. Seed Systems and Diversity: How Seed Regulation and Quality Control Influence Diversity Photo: Stephan Weise and Surya Adhikari, a Nepalese innovator and farmer. Credit: Bioversity Internationl/B. Sthapit
  22. 22. How Does Farmers’Access to Seed Diversity Influence the Sustainability of Food Production and the Quality of Diets? Photo: A farm on the side of Mount Kenya. Credit: CIAT/N. Palmer
  23. 23. Seed Systems and Diversity: How Seed Production Influences Diversity Photo: A seedbank manager at the Jogimara Community Seedbank, Dhading, Nepal. Credit: Bioversity International/R. Vernooy
  24. 24. Farmers select and use local materials Policies, institutions and information systems are in place Genetic materials continue to evolve Farmers continue to use genetic materials in diets and farming systems Materials are adequately characterized and evaluated Favourable dynamic evolutionary forces persist Ex situ conservation On-farm conservation In situ conservation Germplasm of high value (better adapted, nutrient-dense, resistant to pests and diseases) is available to farmers and breeders Conserving genetic resources for sustainable food systems Maintain genetic materials unchanged for perpetuity
  25. 25. On-farm Conservation for Farmers’ Strategies Photo: A home garden in Nepal. Credit: Bioversity International/B. Sthapit
  26. 26. In Situ Conservation for Evolution in the Wild Photo: Bioversity International and Indonesian national partners survey wild mango diversity. Credit: Bioversity International/B. Sthapit
  27. 27. Ex Situ Conservation Photos (L-R): Coconut field bank. Banana seedlings in test tubes. Kenyan woman demonstrates seed diversity conserved in gourds. Credit: Bioversity International/P. Batugal, N. Capozio, Y. Wachira
  28. 28. Conservation - Enabling Environment Photos (L-R): Community biodiversity register of mango. Custodian farmers of ragpur lime and rough lemon rootstocks, India. Credit: Bioversity International/B. Sthapit
  29. 29. The Agrobiodiversity Index A consistent long-term monitoring system for agrobiodiversity to be applied across four sustainable food system components: Nutritious, diverse diets Productive and resilient farms and landscapes Farmers’ access to quality, diverse seeds Conservation of agrobiodiversity for future options
  30. 30. Next Steps • Mainstreaming Agrobiodiversity in Sustainable Food Systems: Scientific foundations for an Agrobiodiversity Index book coming out in early 2017 on expert and stakeholder consultations • Initial design of ABD Index • Verification of the feasibility of measuring bond and corporate performance using an ABD Index • Pilot in two countries (Ethiopia and Peru) • ICT infrastructure development.
  31. 31. Thank you www.bioversityinternational.org/subscribe @BioversityInt Ann Tutwiler a.tutwiler@cgiar.org @AnnTutwiler

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