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How agroecological intensification relates to key ecosystem services
M. Ann Tutwiler, Director General, Bioversity Interna...
Existing system doing neither well
Agricultural biodiversity can help achieve global
goals
Agricultural biodiversity
nourishes people
Zambia
NepalItaly Mexico
IndonesiaVietnam
Photo credit: Top – Bioversity Intern...
Diversity and health are linked
Vietnam: Bioversity International/J. Raneri
Zambia
60
40
20
0
0 +2-2
100% of Global need
We don’t grow enough vegetables,
fruits, nuts and seeds
Red Meat
+468%
Nuts and Seeds
(-68%)
Fish
+48%...
Counting nutrition, not calories
Agricultural biodiversity
sustains the planet:
services to agriculture
Photo credit: Top – Bioversity International (C. Za...
Diversity in farmers’ fields reduces
pest and disease damage
Angular leaf spot disease on bean plant, Uganda
Credit: Biove...
Diversity in landscapes stops
pests in their tracks
Diversity in fields enhances
soil conservation and reduces
sedimentation
Seeds for needs
Over 20,000 smallholder farmers in
13 countries to assess how
agricultural biodiversity can minimize
clima...
Habitat
Agricultural biodiversity
provides
services to the people
Carbon Water Quality
Scenic Value Flood Protection Conne...
Diversified agricultural landscapes
protect wild biodiversity
and profits farmers
1. Scenario
Generator 2. Select relevant ES
3. Run the models
4. Results output
5. Report describing link and contribution...
A single seed can deliver multiple SDGs if it is planted into a
healthy, productive and biodiverse agroecological system
Thank you
www.bioversityinternational.org/subscribe
@BioversityInt
Ann Tutwiler
a.tutwiler@cgiar.org
How agroecological intensification relates to key ecosystem services
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How agroecological intensification relates to key ecosystem services

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Ann Tutwiler, Director General, Bioversity International gave this presentation at the Eighth Biodiversity Conference, Trondheim on 31st May 2016.

Current agricultural intensification practices are the biggest threat to sustainability and a major force behind breaching multiple planetary boundaries (Steffen et al., 2015). Agriculture contributes to between 19 and 29% of total GHG emissions (US EPA 2011, Vermeulen et al. 2012), uses of 69% of freshwater resources (AQUASTAT 2014), and 34% of the terrestrial, icefree surface of the planet accounting for 31% of wild biodiversity loss (Ramankutty et al. 2008). It is the primary driver for the substantial breach of the planetary boundary for phosphorous, and nitrogen (Carpenter and Bennett 2011, Steffen et al. 2015). The foods we produce from these systems struggle to nourish a growing global population where nearly 2 billion suffer from nutrient deficiencies, and another 2 billion suffer from obesity.

In as much as agricultural practices are important parts of the problem, they are likely to be our best bet for novel solutions addressing both human and environmental health. Increasing and improved use of agricultural biodiversity has the capacity provide both food and nutritional security, providing the ingredients of healthy, culturally sensitive, and enjoyable meals.

Mounting evidence suggests that producing food for diversified diets is often complementary with improving agriculture’s sustainability record. Agricultural biodiversity provides the core ecosystem services that underpin sustainable agricultural intensification: pollination, pest control, and sustainably stored and sourced soil nutrients. Finally, as the planet’s largest ecosystem, sustainable intensification of agricultural ecosystems has the capacity to provide multiple ecosystem services converting agriculture from a net source, to net sink of green house gases; reigning in planetary boundaries on phosphorus, nitrogen, and water; and creating a safe space for wild biodiversity .
Achieving agricultural biodiversity’s potential however, requires stronger support of the
research and development community, better articulation of biodiversity’s contribution to
multiple sustainable development goals, and improved indicators and indices that facilitate impact and progress both environmental and human well-being targets.

Find out more about Bioversity International's research on productive and resilient farms, forests and landscapes:
http://www.bioversityinternational.org/initiatives/farms-forests-landscapes/

Visit the official Trondheim 8th Biodiversity Conference page:
http://www.trondheimconference.org/

Published in: Science
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How agroecological intensification relates to key ecosystem services

  1. 1. How agroecological intensification relates to key ecosystem services M. Ann Tutwiler, Director General, Bioversity International Trondheim Conference on Biodiversity, May 31st 2016
  2. 2. Existing system doing neither well
  3. 3. Agricultural biodiversity can help achieve global goals
  4. 4. Agricultural biodiversity nourishes people Zambia NepalItaly Mexico IndonesiaVietnam Photo credit: Top – Bioversity International (E. Hermanowicz, J. Raneri, B. Sthapit) Bottom – Bioversity International/R. Faidutti, LI-BIRD/P. Shrestha, Nicolas Kniseley
  5. 5. Diversity and health are linked Vietnam: Bioversity International/J. Raneri Zambia 60 40 20 0 0 +2-2
  6. 6. 100% of Global need We don’t grow enough vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds Red Meat +468% Nuts and Seeds (-68%) Fish +48% Fruit (-44%) Whole Grains +54% Vegetables (-11%) Milk (-49%) Adapted from Murray 2014
  7. 7. Counting nutrition, not calories
  8. 8. Agricultural biodiversity sustains the planet: services to agriculture Photo credit: Top – Bioversity International (C. Zanzanaini, N. Capozio, P. Lepoint) Bottom – Bioversity International/A. Grasso, G. Martin, Bioversity International/C. Zanzainini Pollination Pest control Nutrient cycling Soil conservation Genetic resources Water
  9. 9. Diversity in farmers’ fields reduces pest and disease damage Angular leaf spot disease on bean plant, Uganda Credit: Bioversity International/P. de Santis Worldwide farmers lose on average 13% of annual harvest to pests and diseases. A farmer can lose 100% of entire crop from a single pest or disease.
  10. 10. Diversity in landscapes stops pests in their tracks
  11. 11. Diversity in fields enhances soil conservation and reduces sedimentation
  12. 12. Seeds for needs Over 20,000 smallholder farmers in 13 countries to assess how agricultural biodiversity can minimize climate change risks. Program provides farmers with more information and access to diversity, enabling them to choose the best options to address their particular climate challenges.
  13. 13. Habitat Agricultural biodiversity provides services to the people Carbon Water Quality Scenic Value Flood Protection Connectivity Photo credit: Top – Bioversity International/N.Capozio, C.Zanzanaini, C.Zanzanaini Bottom – Bioversity International/S.Padulosi, B.Saugat, S.Edake
  14. 14. Diversified agricultural landscapes protect wild biodiversity and profits farmers
  15. 15. 1. Scenario Generator 2. Select relevant ES 3. Run the models 4. Results output 5. Report describing link and contribution to SDGs A decision tool for integrating agriculture and ecosystem services
  16. 16. A single seed can deliver multiple SDGs if it is planted into a healthy, productive and biodiverse agroecological system
  17. 17. Thank you www.bioversityinternational.org/subscribe @BioversityInt Ann Tutwiler a.tutwiler@cgiar.org

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