Remote Sensing Satellite Images for Sugarcane Crop Monitoring

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Presentation of Thelma Krug for the "2nd Workshop on the Impact of New Technologies on the Sustainability of the Sugarcane/Bioethanol Production Cycle"

Apresentação de Thelma Krug realizada no "2nd Workshop on the Impact of New Technologies on the Sustainability of the Sugarcane/Bioethanol Production Cycle "

Date / Data : Novr 11th - 12th 2009/
11 e 12 de novembro de 2009
Place / Local: CTBE, Campinas, Brazil
Event Website / Website do evento: http://www.bioetanol.org.br/workshop5

Published in: Technology
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Remote Sensing Satellite Images for Sugarcane Crop Monitoring

  1. 1. The Canasat Project Remote Sensing Satellite Images for Sugarcane Crop Monitoring Thelma Krug (thelmakrug@dir.inpe.br) Bernardo Rudorff (bernardo@dsr.inpe.br) National Institute for Space Research – INPE2o Workshop on the Impact of New Technologies on the Sustainability of the Sugarcane/ Bioethanol Production Cycle Campinas, 11-12 November, 2009
  2. 2. Land‐use
Change
 
•  Amount,
or
area,
of
land
converted?
 –  Remotely
sensed
data
•  Loca:on
of
land
use
changes?
 –  Remotely
sensed
data
•  Land
types/biomes
converted?
 –  Remotely
sensed
data
and
models
(MODIS,
CBERS,
mixture
 models)
•  GHG
emissions
from
land
conversion?
 –  Good
Prac3ce
Guidance
for
LULUCF
(IPCC)
 –  All
carbon
reservoirs,
including
soil

 –  Non‐CO2
emissions
(fer3lizer
use,
field
burning)

  3. 3. Satellite scenes for South-Central BrazilLandsat-TM, CBERS-CCD & -HRC, DMC, IRS-P6 AWIFS, Terra MODIS, Rapideye
  4. 4. Sugarcane
Area
Es-ma-on
Annual
updates
on
sugarcane
expansion
and
 renova3on
(old
areas
replaced
by
new
areas)
 São
Paulo
State
–

since
2003
 •  South‐Central



–

since
2005

  5. 5. 1
 5
 4
3
 6
 2
 1
 4
 1
 1
 5
 1
 3
 5
 3
 4
 6
 1
 (a)
 (b)
Landsat image interpreted Thematic sugarcane map 1-Sugarcane 2-Citrus 3-Annual crop 4-Forest 5-Pasture 6-Others Landsat-5 image from 24 April 2007 in São Paulo State - Color composition 4(R)5(G)3(B).
  6. 6. Sugarcane Expansion (c) (d)(a) 04/03/2006; (b) 11/09/2006; (c) 24/04/2007 e (d) 15/07/2007
  7. 7. Sugarcane Renovation(a) Soybean (b) Bare soil (c) Sugarcane
  8. 8. Sugarcane area and annual growth rate from crop year 2005/06 to 2008/09 Annual growth rate % Taxa
anual
de
crescimento
(%) Área
(1.000
ha) Total area available for harvest Annual growth rate
  9. 9. Canasat
‐
Harvest

  10. 10. Sugarcane
with
and
without
pre‐harvest
burning

  11. 11. Safra 2006/07
  12. 12. Safra 2007/08
  13. 13. Sugarcane
Field
Burnings 
•  Federal
ini:a:ve
(1999)
 –  Ban
all
sugarcane
field
burnings
by
2021
in
flat
 terrain
and
by
2031
otherwise
•  São
Paulo
State
 –  Ban
in
flat
terrain
by
2014
and
otherwise
by
2017
•  2007/2008
(mechanized
harvest)
 –  36%
in
Brazil
 –  45%
in
São
Paulo
State

  14. 14. Land
use
classes
prior
to
sugarcane
expansion
from
 2005
to
2008
in
São
Paulo
State

  15. 15. Land
use
prior
to
sugarcane
expansion
from
 2005
to
2008
in
São
Paulo
State

  16. 16. Land
use
classes
prior
to
sugarcane
expansion
on
2007
 and
2008
in
the
South‐Central
Region

  17. 17. Spatial-temporal analysis of land use cover change using MODIS images from 2000 to 2008 Overlayed sugarcane mapColor Composition of Principal Components (1-R, 2-G, 3-B) derived from MODIS imagestransformed to the vegetation fraction of a linear mixture model (Shimabukuro & Smith, 1991).
  18. 18. Spectral-temporal trajectory from 2000 to 2008 of MODIS images indicating land use changes from pasture to sugarcaneVegetation Fraction Year Pasture Sugarcane
  19. 19. Spectral-temporal trajectory from 2000 to 2008 of MODIS images indicating land use changes from agriculture to sugarcaneVegetation Fraction Year Agriculture Sugarcane
  20. 20. Spectral-temporal trajectory from 2000 to 2008 of MODIS imagesindicating land use changes from pasture to agriculture to sugarcane Vegetation Fraction Year Pasture Agriculture Sugarcane
  21. 21. iLUC
•  S:ll
under
development
•  Defini:ons
(Gnansounou
et
al.,
2008)
 –  Spa:al
iLUC
(displacement
of
prior
produc:on
to
other
 loca:on)
 –  Temporal
iLUC
(shi`ing
land
use
in
the
same
loca:on)
 –  Use
iLUC
(shi`ing
biomass
use
in
the
same
loca:on)
 –  Displaced
ac:vity/use
iLUC
(avoiding
land
use
change
by
 shi`ing
previous
ac:vity
to
other
countries)

  22. 22. iLUC
•  Addi:onal
land
may
be
happening
despite
 expansion
of
biofuels’
feedstock
produc:on
•  When
expansion
of
biofuel’s
feedstock
takes
 place
in
conjunc:on
with
expansion
of
 agricultural
products
for
food
produc:on
it
is
 hard
to
prove
effect‐cause
rela:ons
between
 biofuel’s
expansion
and
deforesta:on,
for
 instance.

  23. 23. iLUC
•  Need
for
data
to
support
the
idea
that
sugarcane
 expansion
is
leading
to
an
increase
in
the
land
 produc:vity,
rather
than
promo:ng
incorpora:on
on
 new
land
for
food
produc:on,
as
grains
and
pasture
 land
are
displaced.

•  Strong
increase
in
pasture
produc:vity,
measured
by
 stocking
ra:o,
make
the
Brazilian
case
a
strong
 example
of
how
hard
it
is
to
empirically
prove
the
 iLUC
effect
associated
with
the
expansion
of
 sugarcane.

  24. 24. Projec:on
of
crops
and
pasture
displacement
by
 sugarcane
expansion
(2008‐2018) 

  25. 25. On‐going
work
•  Establishment
of
a
Task
Group
on
iLUC
 –  Research
ins:tutes,
academia,
sta:s:cs
ins:tu:ons,
 Secretaries
of
Agriculture,
Pasture
•  Model’s
development
 –  ICONE
(Ins:tute
for
Trade
and
Interna:onal
Nego:a:ons
 Studies)
 •  Model
is
based
on
demand
response
to
price
changes
and
supply
 response
to
market
returns
(profitability)
changes.
 •  Na:onal
and
regional
prices
are
calculated
according
to
a
basic
 assump:on
of
microeconomics:
they
are
achieved
when
supply
 and
demand
prices
for
each
coincide,
genera:ng
a
market
 equilibrium.


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