Increasing ROIthrough an EffectiveCTMS Training ProgramParam Singh
Welcome & IntroductionsParam SinghVice President ofClinical Trial Management SolutionsBioPharm Systems, Inc.• 10+ years of...
Effective Training and ROI“Technology is only usefulto the degree that peopleknow how to use it.”
Effective Training and ROI• According to a recent study:– User groups who had twice the amountof training had a far higher...
AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. C...
AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. C...
Adult Learning Theory• Pioneered by Malcolm Knowlescirca 1950– Prior to that, research had beenfocused on how children lea...
Characteristicsof Adult Learners• Relevancy-Oriented– Why do I need to know this? Why now?• Experience-Oriented– How does ...
Characteristicsof Adult Learners• Practical– How am I going to use what I learn?• Self-Directed– How much say do I have in...
• Traditional model of educating doesnot work for adults• Educators cannot be “experts” whotransmit knowledge and skills t...
Educator-Learner RelationshipTraditional Adult
Traditional AdultEducator-Learner Relationship
Traditional AdultEducator-Learner Relationship
Characteristicsof Effective Adult Educators• Design training courses and materialsaround the characteristics of adultlearn...
Characteristicsof Effective Adult Educators• Deliver training courses and materialswhile exhibiting qualities of a “helper...
AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. C...
Creating a Training Program1. Clarify the purpose.2. Analyze the trainees/users.3. Identify the constraints.4. Design the ...
Clarify the Purpose• What are the desired results of thetraining program?– Short-Term: Minimize productivity losses– Inter...
AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. C...
Analyze theTrainees/Users• What do we know about the users?– Who are they?– What do they need to know?– When do they need ...
AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. C...
Identify the Constraints• Within what constraints do we needto work?– Budget– Resources (both human andtechnological)– Tim...
AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. C...
Design the Training Program• Now that we’ve 1) clarified thepurpose, 2) analyzed the users, and3) identified the constrain...
Consider the MethodsInitial Rollout• Lectures or Seminars• Instructor-Led Training, ClassroomStyle with Hands-On Practice•...
Consider the Methods• Lectures or Seminars– Trainer presents to a large group– Includes live demonstrations of how thesoft...
Consider the Methods• Lectures or SeminarsPros:– Good for beginners who have nofoundational knowledge or experienceCons:– ...
Consider the Methods• Instructor-Led Training, ClassroomStyle with Hands-On Practice– Trainer shows users how system works...
Consider the Methods• Instructor-Led Training, ClassroomStyle with Hands-On PracticePros:– Helps reinforce training concep...
Consider the Methods• Instructor-Led Training, One-on-Onewith Hands-On Practice– Trainer teaches each user how to use thes...
Consider the Methods• Instructor-Led Training, One-on-Onewith Hands-On PracticePros:– Most effective method of training– U...
Consider the Methods• Computer Based Training– Individual users complete one or moretraining modules via their computer in...
Consider the Methods• Computer Based TrainingPros:– Self-paced; users complete the trainingon their own schedule– Useful f...
Consider the Methods• Computer Based TrainingCons:– Can be expensive and time-consuming tocreate and update– Not cost-effe...
Consider the Methods• Book-Based Training– Individual users complete workbooklessons on how to perform common tasks– Usual...
Consider the Methods• Book-Based TrainingPros:– Self-paced; users complete the trainingon their own schedule– Can be used ...
Consider the Methods• Combination Training– Combines one or more methods oftraining, such as:• Lecture/Seminar followed by...
Consider the Methods• Combination TrainingPros:– Allows for a more creative and flexibletraining program tailored to your ...
Consider the MethodsLonger-Term Support• Work Instructions• In-Application “Help” Articles• Job Aids / Quick Reference Gui...
Consider the Methods• Work Instructions– Written (printed or electronic) step-by-step instructions for completing aspecifi...
Consider the Methods• Work InstructionsPros:– Useful for complex tasks or tasks that aremore controlled by business proces...
Consider the Methods• In-Application “Help” Articles– Similar to work instructions, butembedded in the “Help” function of ...
Consider the Methods• In-Application “Help” ArticlesPros:– Cannot be misplaced like paper workinstructions; always present...
Consider the Methods• Job Aids / Quick Reference Guides– Single-page documents designed to beprinted, posted, and glanced ...
Consider the Methods• Job Aids / Quick Reference GuidesPros:– Great for short tasks that are either notperformed often or ...
Consider the Methods• CBT Refreshers– Similar to a quick reference video, butcan include user interaction andknowledge che...
Consider the Methods• CBT RefreshersPros:– Interactivity helps users retain conceptsand details– Users can complete traini...
Consider the Methods• Focus Sessions– Brief in-person meetings during which aspecific topic or task is presented anddiscus...
Consider the Methods• Focus SessionsPros:– Good for tasks that can be adequatelycovered in a short period of time– Great f...
Consider the Methods• Quick Tips– Brief reminders, tips, tricks, bestpractices, or “Did you know?”s– Can be sent via email...
Consider the Methods• Quick TipsPros:– Keep the system in the forefront ofusers’ minds– Help reinforce information provide...
Consider the Methods• User Support Meetings– Regular (weekly, bi-weekly, monthly)meetings that include users, super users,...
Consider the Methods• User Support MeetingsPros:– Help identify best practices, “Dos andDon’ts,” system bugs, and enhancem...
Design the Training Program• Considering the goals, users, andconstraints, which training method orcombination of methods ...
Design the Training ProgramSample Scenario:– 300 users– 2 countries, 2 primary languages– Fairly tech savvy– Many have use...
Design the Training ProgramSample Solution:– Create a CBT self-training course with severalmodules, translated into second...
Design the Training ProgramGood Solution?– Scalable:• CBT course can be used by new employees,not just initial wave• Only ...
Design the Training ProgramGood Solution?– Flexible:• Users control own pace of training• Users able to practice on their ...
AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. C...
Best Practices – Planning• Once you’ve drafted your trainingprogram, get input from users as towhether it will meet their ...
Best Practices – Logistics• Prior to training, develop a plan forcollecting and (later) evaluatingrequests for system enha...
Best Practices – Logistics• Provide trainees with a sandboxenvironment that mirrors production.– Pristine environment with...
Best Practices – Executives• Get your executives using the systemearly.– Executive support increases useradoption• Get an ...
AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. C...
Questions?
ClosingThank you for attending!This presentation will be availablefor download fromwww.BioPharm.comwithin 24 hourspsingh@b...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Increasing ROI through an Effective CTMS Training Program

506 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
506
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Increasing ROI through an Effective CTMS Training Program

  1. 1. Increasing ROIthrough an EffectiveCTMS Training ProgramParam Singh
  2. 2. Welcome & IntroductionsParam SinghVice President ofClinical Trial Management SolutionsBioPharm Systems, Inc.• 10+ years of experienceimplementing Siebel Clinical• Managed over a dozen Siebel Clinicalimplementations
  3. 3. Effective Training and ROI“Technology is only usefulto the degree that peopleknow how to use it.”
  4. 4. Effective Training and ROI• According to a recent study:– User groups who had twice the amountof training had a far higher level ofproject success– Projects where 7% of the project budgetwas spent on training were significantlymore successful than projects wheretraining took up only 4% of the budget• Key to successful CTMS project =an effective training program
  5. 5. AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. Clarify the purpose1:20-1:25 2. Analyze the trainees/users1:25-1:30 3. Identify the constraints1:30-1:40 4. Design the training program1:40-1:45 Tips and Best Practices1:45-2:00 Questions
  6. 6. AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. Clarify the purpose1:20-1:25 2. Analyze the trainees/users1:25-1:30 3. Identify the constraints1:30-1:40 4. Design the training program1:40-1:45 Tips and Best Practices1:45-2:00 Questions
  7. 7. Adult Learning Theory• Pioneered by Malcolm Knowlescirca 1950– Prior to that, research had beenfocused on how children learn• Knowles’ research revealed significantdifferences in:– Characteristics of adult learners– Adult educator-learner relationship– Characteristics of effective adult educators
  8. 8. Characteristicsof Adult Learners• Relevancy-Oriented– Why do I need to know this? Why now?• Experience-Oriented– How does this connect to what I alreadyknow?• Goal-Oriented– What am I going to learn? How will it helpme solve real-life problems?
  9. 9. Characteristicsof Adult Learners• Practical– How am I going to use what I learn?• Self-Directed– How much say do I have in what and howI learn?• Self-Motivated– Am I willing to learn?
  10. 10. • Traditional model of educating doesnot work for adults• Educators cannot be “experts” whotransmit knowledge and skills tolearners• Educators must be “helpers” whoneed the learners’ knowledge andexperience as much as the learnersneed themEducator-Learner Relationship
  11. 11. Educator-Learner RelationshipTraditional Adult
  12. 12. Traditional AdultEducator-Learner Relationship
  13. 13. Traditional AdultEducator-Learner Relationship
  14. 14. Characteristicsof Effective Adult Educators• Design training courses and materialsaround the characteristics of adultlearners– Relevant to current or upcoming situation– Build on previous experiences– Include concrete learning objectives andcheckpoints at which to measure progress– Demonstrate practical application withactive input from learners– Flexible in scope, speed, and methods
  15. 15. Characteristicsof Effective Adult Educators• Deliver training courses and materialswhile exhibiting qualities of a “helper”– Genuine – Good listener– Patient – Empathetic– Respectful – Flexible– Interested in the topic and the learners– Shares own perspective as that of oneperson, not the definitive answer– Views self as a resource to be used by thelearners, rather than as the expert
  16. 16. AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. Clarify the purpose1:20-1:25 2. Analyze the trainees/users1:25-1:30 3. Identify the constraints1:30-1:40 4. Design the training program1:40-1:45 Tips and Best Practices1:45-2:00 Questions
  17. 17. Creating a Training Program1. Clarify the purpose.2. Analyze the trainees/users.3. Identify the constraints.4. Design the training program.
  18. 18. Clarify the Purpose• What are the desired results of thetraining program?– Short-Term: Minimize productivity losses– Intermediate: Increase efficiency– Long-Term: Maintain efficiency ofexisting users and seamlessly fold in newusers
  19. 19. AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. Clarify the purpose1:20-1:25 2. Analyze the trainees/users1:25-1:30 3. Identify the constraints1:30-1:40 4. Design the training program1:40-1:45 Tips and Best Practices1:45-2:00 Questions
  20. 20. Analyze theTrainees/Users• What do we know about the users?– Who are they?– What do they need to know?– When do they need to know it
  21. 21. AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. Clarify the purpose1:20-1:25 2. Analyze the trainees/users1:25-1:30 3. Identify the constraints1:30-1:40 4. Design the training program1:40-1:45 Tips and Best Practices1:45-2:00 Questions
  22. 22. Identify the Constraints• Within what constraints do we needto work?– Budget– Resources (both human andtechnological)– Time / rollout plan– Location(s) of users
  23. 23. AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. Clarify the purpose1:20-1:25 2. Analyze the trainees/users1:25-1:30 3. Identify the constraints1:30-1:40 4. Design the training program1:40-1:45 Tips and Best Practices1:45-2:00 Questions
  24. 24. Design the Training Program• Now that we’ve 1) clarified thepurpose, 2) analyzed the users, and3) identified the constraints, we’reready to 4) design the trainingprogram• First step in the design process:consider the available trainingmethods
  25. 25. Consider the MethodsInitial Rollout• Lectures or Seminars• Instructor-Led Training, ClassroomStyle with Hands-On Practice• Instructor-Led Training, One-on-Onewith Hands-On Practice• Computer-Based Training• Book-Based Training• Combination Training
  26. 26. Consider the Methods• Lectures or Seminars– Trainer presents to a large group– Includes live demonstrations of how thesoftware works and how to performcommon tasks– Works well for groups of 20-50– Most popular type of training
  27. 27. Consider the Methods• Lectures or SeminarsPros:– Good for beginners who have nofoundational knowledge or experienceCons:– Not ideal for topics that require traineeinteraction or role playing to reinforceconcepts– Does not give users the ability to practicealong with what they are learning
  28. 28. Consider the Methods• Instructor-Led Training, ClassroomStyle with Hands-On Practice– Trainer shows users how system worksand how to perform certain tasks– Users follow along with the trainer– Users perform practice exercises withtrainer present to assist them– Effective for group of 15-30
  29. 29. Consider the Methods• Instructor-Led Training, ClassroomStyle with Hands-On PracticePros:– Helps reinforce training concepts– Helps users retain informationCons:– Requires each user to have a computerwith an Internet connection
  30. 30. Consider the Methods• Instructor-Led Training, One-on-Onewith Hands-On Practice– Trainer teaches each user how to use thesystem to perform his/her specific jobfunction– Users perform practice exercises withtrainer present to assist them
  31. 31. Consider the Methods• Instructor-Led Training, One-on-Onewith Hands-On PracticePros:– Most effective method of training– Users learn and practice only what isrelevant to themCons:– Can be quite expensive and time-consuming
  32. 32. Consider the Methods• Computer Based Training– Individual users complete one or moretraining modules via their computer intheir own workspace– Usually interactive; practice exercises andknowledge checks built in
  33. 33. Consider the Methods• Computer Based TrainingPros:– Self-paced; users complete the trainingon their own schedule– Useful for groups with diverse user rolesand a wide range of software skill levels– Provides objective assessments of users’level of understanding– Can be used later as a refresher– Cost-effective for larger user groups
  34. 34. Consider the Methods• Computer Based TrainingCons:– Can be expensive and time-consuming tocreate and update– Not cost-effective for smaller user groups– Some users have trouble learning withouthuman interaction– CBT needs a support team like any othersoftware for questions, troubleshooting,etc.
  35. 35. Consider the Methods• Book-Based Training– Individual users complete workbooklessons on how to perform common tasks– Usually illustrated with screenshots
  36. 36. Consider the Methods• Book-Based TrainingPros:– Self-paced; users complete the trainingon their own schedule– Can be used later as a refresherCons:– Some users have trouble learning withouthuman interaction– Does not include any practice within thesystem
  37. 37. Consider the Methods• Combination Training– Combines one or more methods oftraining, such as:• Lecture/Seminar followed by CBT course• Book-based training combined with access tosandbox• CBT course followed by optional Q&A seminars
  38. 38. Consider the Methods• Combination TrainingPros:– Allows for a more creative and flexibletraining program tailored to your businessand user needs– May save moneyCons:– Requires more coordination and planning
  39. 39. Consider the MethodsLonger-Term Support• Work Instructions• In-Application “Help” Articles• Job Aids / Quick Reference Guides• CBT Refreshers• Focus Sessions• Quick Tips• User Support Meetings
  40. 40. Consider the Methods• Work Instructions– Written (printed or electronic) step-by-step instructions for completing aspecific task– Have business process guidanceembedded in the steps taken in system– Users use work instructions to guide themas they perform the task
  41. 41. Consider the Methods• Work InstructionsPros:– Useful for complex tasks or tasks that aremore controlled by business process thanby system functionality– Can be ‘customized’ by users throughwriting or typing in notes for themselvesCons:– Often text-heavy, which can be difficultfor visual learners
  42. 42. Consider the Methods• In-Application “Help” Articles– Similar to work instructions, butembedded in the “Help” function of thesystem– Depending on the system, can be statictext that tells the user what to do or canbe a “wizard” that guides the userthrough the completion of each step
  43. 43. Consider the Methods• In-Application “Help” ArticlesPros:– Cannot be misplaced like paper workinstructions; always present in the system– Easy to maintain; users are alwaysworking with the most current versionCons:– Cannot be ‘customized’ by users withnotes to themselves– Cannot be reviewed outside the system
  44. 44. Consider the Methods• Job Aids / Quick Reference Guides– Single-page documents designed to beprinted, posted, and glanced at as-needed• Can also be short videos– Often visual, but can include briefexplanations, steps to take, or checklists– Users reference them only when theyneed a reminder
  45. 45. Consider the Methods• Job Aids / Quick Reference GuidesPros:– Great for short tasks that are either notperformed often or that are performed byusers who are not often in the system– Excellent for visual learnersCons:– Not good for original learning; requirefoundational understanding first– Not good for complex topics or tasks
  46. 46. Consider the Methods• CBT Refreshers– Similar to a quick reference video, butcan include user interaction andknowledge checks– Can be an original CBT module that isre-visited, or can be specifically designedas a refresher– Knowledge checks are usually not gradedor documented
  47. 47. Consider the Methods• CBT RefreshersPros:– Interactivity helps users retain conceptsand details– Users can complete training at their ownpaceCons:– Require use of CBT development tool– Can be time-consuming and costly tocreate and update
  48. 48. Consider the Methods• Focus Sessions– Brief in-person meetings during which aspecific topic or task is presented anddiscussed– Roughly 5-10 minutes in length– Can be added to regular weekly ormonthly team meetings, or can takeplace during lunch
  49. 49. Consider the Methods• Focus SessionsPros:– Good for tasks that can be adequatelycovered in a short period of time– Great for troubleshooting and identifyingbest practicesCons:– Can be challenging to gather everyonetogether in person
  50. 50. Consider the Methods• Quick Tips– Brief reminders, tips, tricks, bestpractices, or “Did you know?”s– Can be sent via email to specificdistribution lists– Can be a section in a regular newsletter
  51. 51. Consider the Methods• Quick TipsPros:– Keep the system in the forefront ofusers’ minds– Help reinforce information providedthrough other methodsCons:– Not good for original learning; requirefoundational understanding first– Can be easily ignored or overlooked
  52. 52. Consider the Methods• User Support Meetings– Regular (weekly, bi-weekly, monthly)meetings that include users, super users,trainers, and IT representatives– No presentations; focused more onsharing ideas and gathering feedback– Usually not highly structured, but havingtopics planned can make them moreproductive
  53. 53. Consider the Methods• User Support MeetingsPros:– Help identify best practices, “Dos andDon’ts,” system bugs, and enhancementrequests– Help users understand how others areusing the systemCons:– Only useful after users have becomevery familiar with the system
  54. 54. Design the Training Program• Considering the goals, users, andconstraints, which training method orcombination of methods would makethe most sense?– Leverage what already exists– Think short, intermediate, long term– Make sure the plan is scalable– Account for point release training
  55. 55. Design the Training ProgramSample Scenario:– 300 users– 2 countries, 2 primary languages– Fairly tech savvy– Many have used a CTMS before– All users will switch to new CTMSsimultaneously– Limited budget– In-house training department has resourcesavailable to help
  56. 56. Design the Training ProgramSample Solution:– Create a CBT self-training course with severalmodules, translated into second language– Grant users access to a sandbox environment– Require all users to complete self-training onapplicable modules by a specified deadline– After the deadline, allow users to attendoptional live WebEx question/answer sessions– Hold quarterly user meetings to solicit feedback– Over time, create job aids and in-application“help” articles for FAQs
  57. 57. Design the Training ProgramGood Solution?– Scalable:• CBT course can be used by new employees,not just initial wave• Only applicable modules need to becompleted– Budget-Minded:• Saves travel costs for trainers/trainees• Saves time managing live training logistics• Saves time that might be “wasted” by havingsavvy users sit through a class
  58. 58. Design the Training ProgramGood Solution?– Flexible:• Users control own pace of training• Users able to practice on their own• Optional Q&A sessions provide extra supportonly if needed– Long-Term-Oriented:• Built-in mechanism for collecting systemenhancement requests and training/supportrequests
  59. 59. AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. Clarify the purpose1:20-1:25 2. Analyze the trainees/users1:25-1:30 3. Identify the constraints1:30-1:40 4. Design the training program1:40-1:45 Tips and Best Practices1:45-2:00 Questions
  60. 60. Best Practices – Planning• Once you’ve drafted your trainingprogram, get input from users as towhether it will meet their needs.• Conduct a dry-run of your initialtraining program.• Consider phased training.– Cover minimum needed to perform job,then build upon it over time
  61. 61. Best Practices – Logistics• Prior to training, develop a plan forcollecting and (later) evaluatingrequests for system enhancements.– Requests always come up during training– Having a plan for capturing themprevents training from being derailed• Explain the plan at the beginning oflive training.– Wise to also have it documented in aneasily-accessible place
  62. 62. Best Practices – Logistics• Provide trainees with a sandboxenvironment that mirrors production.– Pristine environment with real study data• Make sure users have appropriatesystem and record-level permissionsprior to training.– #1 training issue = wrong permissions• Have trainees close their laptopsduring demos and discussions.– Minimizes distractions
  63. 63. Best Practices – Executives• Get your executives using the systemearly.– Executive support increases useradoption• Get an Executive Mandate aboutswitching over to the new CTMS.– Example: All new studies must beentered into CTMS– Drives user adoption and consistent useof the system
  64. 64. AgendaTime Topic1:00-1:05 Welcome & Introductions1:05-1:15 Theoretical FoundationCreating a Training Program1:15-1:20 1. Clarify the purpose1:20-1:25 2. Analyze the trainees/users1:25-1:30 3. Identify the constraints1:30-1:40 4. Design the training program1:40-1:45 Tips and Best Practices1:45-2:00 Questions
  65. 65. Questions?
  66. 66. ClosingThank you for attending!This presentation will be availablefor download fromwww.BioPharm.comwithin 24 hourspsingh@biopharm.com

×