Math it really should just make sense part 2

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This slideshare presentation is the second portion of a two part series. It reviews four comprehension strategies used in math (making connections, visualizing, predicting, and inferring) and then adds asking questions and synthesis. Arthur Hyde's book "Comprehending Math" is the foundation for this presentation.

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Math it really should just make sense part 2

  1. 1. MATHIt Should ReallyJust Make Sense! Integrating Comprehension Strategies into Mathematics Instruction-Part 2 April 2013 Grantsburg School District Billie Rengo-Literacy Coach
  2. 2. COMPREHENSION (REVIEW) Comprehension difficulties exist both in reading and in math. Students might appear to understand mathematical operations. Memorization vs. understanding All of our comprehension strategies we use in reading can explicitly be taught in math (Hyde, 2008) (Sammons, 2010) Result? Deeper understanding!
  3. 3. IDENTIFY THE STRATEGY!
  4. 4. What are thebenefits todoinganticipationguides?
  5. 5. What are these students doing? What is a potential drawback of this strategy in math?
  6. 6. K (What do I know?) W (What do I want to C (Are there any find out?) special conditions?) (Hyde, 2008)
  7. 7. What strategy is this?
  8. 8. WHAT IS THIS STRATEGY? 37, 47, 57, ___, ___, 87, ___, ___ ____ + ____=____
  9. 9. PREDICTING IN PROBABILITY… Scenario:  Divide the class up into groups of 3-4 students  Each student has a role (supplier, grabber, recorder, and reporter) Image credit: mathcoachblog.wordpress.com  Each group is given an index card with a letter S-Z (which is taped to the table)  Suppliers come up and get a bag with a letter.  The teacher says “Inside your bag are 10 cubes, some red, some blue, some yellow.” (He/she then pulls out one of each color and drops it back in the bag). “You are not to look in the bag. Instead, you must take out 1 cube, record its color, and drop it back in the bag. Do this 25 times. Then analyze your data and predict how many of each color are in the bag.”  The group analyzes the results together and the reporter shares the group’s thinking with the class. (Hyde, 2008)
  10. 10. ASKING QUESTIONS
  11. 11. SYNTHESIS Look at all of the available information to derive answers Our initial thinking may be completely changed Aha! Moments Math journal writing for students to reflect on how they are doing and which processes they use
  12. 12. A SYNTHESIS STORY PROBLEMMary, who is 36, has two sisters (Carol and Julie). If all three sisters put their three ages in a pile (of unifix cubes), there would be 96. How old are each of Mary’s sisters?
  13. 13. REFERENCES Hyde, A. A. (2008). Comprehending math, adapting reading strategies to teach mathematics, k-6. Greenwood International. Sammons, L. (2010). Guided math: a framework for mathematics instruction. Huntington Beach, CA: Shell Education.

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