How Closely Related Are We?

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A donkey's your uncle and a roundworm's your cousin! That's not entirely true, but you might be surprised by just how closely related you are.

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How Closely Related Are We?

  1. 1. TEACHER MATERIALS HOW CLOSELY RELATED ARE WE Directions: Have students work on their own to try to match the following list of organisms with the percentage of DNA shared with humans. Students will draw a line between the left and right column to match the following list of organisms with the percentage of DNA shared with humans. After students have finished, ask them if the numbers make sense to them. Why, for example, do they think we are more closely related to a plant than bacteria? Are they surprised at how much DNA we have in common with chimps and zebra fish? Fruit fly 15% Chimpanzee 21% Zebrafish 7% Bacteria 85% Mustard grass 36% Round worm 98% Source of Statistics: “Genes in Common,” The Tech Museum at Stanford University, Accessed 15 May 2013 http://genetics.thetech.org/online-exhibits/genes-common BIG HISTORY PROJECT / LESSON 5.0 ACTIVITY
  2. 2. Name: Date: STUDENT MATERIALS HOW CLOSELY RELATED ARE WE Directions: Draw a line between the left and right column to match the following list of organisms with the percentage of DNA shared with humans. Do these numbers make sense to you? Why do you think we are more closely related to a plant than bacteria? Are you surprised at how much DNA we have in common with chimps and zebrafish? Fruit fly 15% Chimpanzee 21% Zebrafish 7% Bacteria 85% Mustard grass 36% Round worm 98% Source of Statistics: “Genes in Common,” The Tech Museum at Stanford University, Accessed 15 May 2013 http://genetics.thetech.org/online-exhibits/genes-common BIG HISTORY PROJECT / LESSON 5.0 ACTIVITY

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