Successfully reported this slideshow.
1<br />An Introduction to <br />Knowledge Management<br />Knowledge Management in Organization<br />Dr. BibiAlajmi<br />Fa...
Week 1-Agenda<br />This week’s agenda<br />Review course objectives.<br />Conduct course introduction and overview.<br />R...
Course Objectives<br />Objectives for the Course<br />To explore the history & theory of Knowledge Management (KM)<br />To...
Learning Methods<br />Learning methods we’ll use:<br />Reading<br />Lecture slides, embellished by a weekly video<br />Dis...
Slide 42<br />574<br />Learning Methods<br />Semester’s Work Schedule & Key Assignments<br />Semester’s schedule is contai...
   Weekly videos
   Learning activities
   Flexibility to focus on your specific areas of interest
   Will always highlight following week’s work and deliverables </li></ul>     at the end of each set of lecture slides.<b...
   Position statement
   DSS presentation (slides & video intro)
   Term project submissions
   Discussions & postings 			On-going
   Group Discussion leadership			Varies/ongoing</li></li></ul><li>Slide 43 <br />574<br />Learning Methods<br />Texts & Re...
7<br />What is Knowledge Management <br />
Introduction: KM <br />What is Knowledge Management?<br />Do you have some preconceived ideas?<br />What are your ideas?<b...
Understanding KM<br />Understanding KM<br />One Perspective:<br />	Understanding Knowledge Management requires an understa...
One Perspective<br /> Data to Knowledge Hierarchy <br />Image source:  http://www.archimuse.com/mw2003/papers/zimmermann/z...
Classic Data to Wisdom Hierarchy <br />Wisdom<br />  Knowledge<br />    Information<br />      Data<br />11<br />Another V...
Another Version<br />From Facts to Wisdom(Haeckel & Nolan, 1993)one example of the hierarchy:<br />This hierarchy isn’t th...
Here’s an important question:What is knowledge?<br />13<br />An important question?<br />Why is it important?<br />Because...
How do we think of knowledge?<br />Sometimes we speak in these terms:<br />Knowledge asprocess – an active state of knowin...
Cont. Knowledge AS …<br />Here’s one concept:Knowledge as a process !<br />The act of informing<br />Communication of know...
Cont. Knowledge AS …<br />Knowledge as a thing !<br />Objects, entities<br /> Texts, documents<br /> Tangibles<br /> Physi...
Can knowledge be a thing?Perhaps we should question this concept…<br />Knowledge objects<br />Knowledge artifacts<br />Kno...
Cont. Knowledge AS …<br />How do we think of knowledge?<br />If we are to move through the taxonomy of data, information, ...
KM Perspectives <br />KM Definition <br />“KM [Knowledge Management] involves blending a company’s internal and external i...
Knowledge Management can be seen as an attempt to turn tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge.<br />20<br />Defining KM <...
Types of Knowledge<br />Tacit   Explicit Knowledge<br />These two categories highlight different aspects of human knowled...
Knowledge is often known as<br />Types of Knowledge<br />Implicit or Tacit<br />Subconscious<br />Difficult to articulate<...
KM Modules<br />Knowledge Management Models<br />Documentalist<br />Technologist<br />Learner & Communicator<br />23<br />
History of Information Professionals as Knowledge Managers<br />Knowledge management is a new business strategy, but its t...
KM Modules: Documentalist<br />Documentalists and information staff<br />Suzanne Briet, sometimes called “Madame Documenta...
KM Modules: Technologist<br />KM as a Technological Solution<br />Is KM<br />Big business?<br />A competitive advantage?<b...
KM Modules: Technologist<br />Contentnetshave a role to play in KM<br />As knowledge repositories for tacit knowledge that...
KM Modules: Technologist<br />Peoplenets & Processnetshave a role to play in KM<br />For group learning applications<br />...
KM Modules: Technologist<br />The Challenges of Electronic Collaboration in Knowledge Sharing<br />“Focusing exclusively o...
KM Modules: Learner & Communicator<br />The Learning and Communication Process Model<br />Innovation is a way of life<br /...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Lecture slide week1_introduction

2,022 views

Published on

Knowledge Management in Organization_Lecture 1

Published in: Education, Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Lecture slide week1_introduction

  1. 1. 1<br />An Introduction to <br />Knowledge Management<br />Knowledge Management in Organization<br />Dr. BibiAlajmi<br />Fall / 2011<br />
  2. 2. Week 1-Agenda<br />This week’s agenda<br />Review course objectives.<br />Conduct course introduction and overview.<br />Review syllabus.<br />Introduce each other to the course members.<br />Review for this week.<br />2<br />
  3. 3. Course Objectives<br />Objectives for the Course<br />To explore the history & theory of Knowledge Management (KM)<br />To understand the controversies around KM<br />To learn about how KM programs are implemented through different models<br />To apply KM to the work of information & communication professionals<br />To understand KM through simulations & exercises<br />To learn about the ethical issues & problems inherent in KM<br />3<br />
  4. 4. Learning Methods<br />Learning methods we’ll use:<br />Reading<br />Lecture slides, embellished by a weekly video<br />Discussion online (in eCollege)<br />Online exploration (the Web, databases, etc.)<br />Case studies<br />Using social media – wiki & others<br />Writing & Presenting ideas and information<br />Creating and uploading videos<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Slide 42<br />574<br />Learning Methods<br />Semester’s Work Schedule & Key Assignments<br />Semester’s schedule is contained in syllabus (see “how we’ll<br /> proceed,” p. 3) <br /><ul><li> Weekly readings
  6. 6. Weekly videos
  7. 7. Learning activities
  8. 8. Flexibility to focus on your specific areas of interest
  9. 9. Will always highlight following week’s work and deliverables </li></ul> at the end of each set of lecture slides.<br />Key Assignments<br /><ul><li> Analysis papers and comments
  10. 10. Position statement
  11. 11. DSS presentation (slides & video intro)
  12. 12. Term project submissions
  13. 13. Discussions & postings On-going
  14. 14. Group Discussion leadership Varies/ongoing</li></li></ul><li>Slide 43 <br />574<br />Learning Methods<br />Texts & Reading Materials <br />Texts <br />American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication Manual. 5th ed.<br /> Washington, DC: APA. N.B.: All papers will need to follow the format<br />for citations and bibliography as given in this manual. You can also use the websites indicated in the APA help sheet posted on eCollege’s course site.<br />Davenport, Thomas H. & Prusak, Laurence. (1998, 2000). Working<br />Knowledge: How Organizations Manage What They Know. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.<br />Reading Materials<br />Articles and other reading materials on the syllabus are available through the Rutgers University Libraries; click on Electronic Journals, and then search on the journal title. N.B. Most articles will be available on the course website. Check our course site first.<br />
  15. 15. 7<br />What is Knowledge Management <br />
  16. 16. Introduction: KM <br />What is Knowledge Management?<br />Do you have some preconceived ideas?<br />What are your ideas?<br />What have you read?<br />What have you heard?<br />What do you imagine?<br />8<br />
  17. 17. Understanding KM<br />Understanding KM<br />One Perspective:<br /> Understanding Knowledge Management requires an understanding of knowledge and the knowing process and how that differs from information and information management.<br />Another Perspective:<br /> Requires understanding of knowledge processes (sharing, creation) and how these differ from information and its management.<br />9<br />
  18. 18. One Perspective<br /> Data to Knowledge Hierarchy <br />Image source: http://www.archimuse.com/mw2003/papers/zimmermann/zimmermann.fig1.gif<br />10<br />
  19. 19. Classic Data to Wisdom Hierarchy <br />Wisdom<br /> Knowledge<br /> Information<br /> Data<br />11<br />Another Version<br />Although this hierarchy is used often in writing about the differences between the terms listed, there are some problems in that items such as data and information do not fit neatly in category “boxes.”<br />
  20. 20. Another Version<br />From Facts to Wisdom(Haeckel & Nolan, 1993)one example of the hierarchy:<br />This hierarchy isn’t the total picture, but it is a commonly cited framework.<br />12<br />
  21. 21. Here’s an important question:What is knowledge?<br />13<br />An important question?<br />Why is it important?<br />Because before we can truly understand knowledge management, we need to know what knowledge is and why we distinguish knowledge from data and information.<br />The image symbolizes knowledge because it shows information “stock” as D & P say, intertwined with what a human being knows, and possibly converted to some new knowledge artifact or object such as a book. Ask yourself – what do the hearts symbolize? <br />
  22. 22. How do we think of knowledge?<br />Sometimes we speak in these terms:<br />Knowledge asprocess – an active state of knowing and/or acquiring knowledge<br />Knowledge asthing – to be captured, organized, stored, and accessed<br />14<br />Knowledge AS …<br />
  23. 23. Cont. Knowledge AS …<br />Here’s one concept:Knowledge as a process !<br />The act of informing<br />Communication of knowledge<br />Hearing or seeing the news<br />Action of telling a fact<br />What is known is changed.<br />Michael Buckland. (1991, June). Information as thing. JASIS, 45 (5), 351-360.<br />15<br />
  24. 24. Cont. Knowledge AS …<br />Knowledge as a thing !<br />Objects, entities<br /> Texts, documents<br /> Tangibles<br /> Physical thing<br /> Can be measured<br />Michael Buckland. (1991, June). Information as thing. JASIS, 45 (5), 351-360.<br />16<br />
  25. 25. Can knowledge be a thing?Perhaps we should question this concept…<br />Knowledge objects<br />Knowledge artifacts<br />Knowledge stock<br />Knowledge bases<br />Knowledge repositories<br />This is a point of controversy in the knowledge management field.<br />17<br />Cont. Knowledge AS …<br />Here’s another icon that’s used to represent knowledge. Do you think it works? How? Why?<br />
  26. 26. Cont. Knowledge AS …<br />How do we think of knowledge?<br />If we are to move through the taxonomy of data, information, knowledge, there has to be human intervention. As Davenport and Prusak say, “humans must do virtually all the work.” <br />Working Knowledge, p. 6.<br />18<br />
  27. 27. KM Perspectives <br />KM Definition <br />“KM [Knowledge Management] involves blending a company’s internal and external information and turning it into actionable knowledge via a technology platform.”<br /> Susan DiMattia and Norman Oder, 1997.<br />19<br />
  28. 28. Knowledge Management can be seen as an attempt to turn tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge.<br />20<br />Defining KM <br />
  29. 29. Types of Knowledge<br />Tacit  Explicit Knowledge<br />These two categories highlight different aspects of human knowledge: individual knowledge & organizational knowledge.<br />21<br />
  30. 30. Knowledge is often known as<br />Types of Knowledge<br />Implicit or Tacit<br />Subconscious<br />Difficult to articulate<br />Experience-based<br />Shared through conversation<br />Stories/narratives<br />Insights & understanding<br />Judgments <br />Residing in people<br />Personal<br />Explicit<br />Formally articulated<br />Fixed<br />More easily codified<br />Documented (written, taped, recorded, digitized, etc.)<br />Stored in things (databases, files, etc.)<br />Pushed or pulled<br />Organizational<br />22<br />
  31. 31. KM Modules<br />Knowledge Management Models<br />Documentalist<br />Technologist<br />Learner & Communicator<br />23<br />
  32. 32. History of Information Professionals as Knowledge Managers<br />Knowledge management is a new business strategy, but its techniques might be traced to the work of documentalists in the early part of the twentieth century. <br />24<br />KM Modules: Documentalist<br /><ul><li>In Europe and America in the first part of the twentieth century, documentalists had grand visions of collecting, codifying and organizing the world’s knowledge for the purpose of world peace.</li></li></ul><li>KM Modules: Documentalist<br />Information Professionals as Knowledge Managers & documentalists<br />The documentalists were the original multimedia professionals.<br />Paul Otlet – began the International Federation for Documentation. He wanted libraries to stop being depositories and to become more dynamic in information transfer.<br />Under the leadership of Otlet the Europeans not only collected and codified documents, they developed networks and worked to exchange knowledge among people.<br />25<br />
  33. 33. KM Modules: Documentalist<br />Documentalists and information staff<br />Suzanne Briet, sometimes called “Madame Documentation” drew the comparison between American business information specialists and European documentalists after a visit to America in 1954. <br />26<br />
  34. 34. KM Modules: Technologist<br />KM as a Technological Solution<br />Is KM<br />Big business?<br />A competitive advantage?<br />Intellectual capital?<br />An intranet solution?<br />An asset dimension?<br />A technological infrastructure?<br />27<br />
  35. 35. KM Modules: Technologist<br />Contentnetshave a role to play in KM<br />As knowledge repositories for tacit knowledge that has been made explicit<br />For best practices databases<br />For expert “yellow pages”<br />Online learning and knowledge sharing<br />Knowledge sharing “boards”<br />28<br />
  36. 36. KM Modules: Technologist<br />Peoplenets & Processnetshave a role to play in KM<br />For group learning applications<br />To connect individuals with each other for mentoring and knowledge sharing<br />For decision support & decision making<br />To sense, share, and respond to the “signals” coming from the environment<br />To capture ideas and turn them into action.<br />29<br />
  37. 37. KM Modules: Technologist<br />The Challenges of Electronic Collaboration in Knowledge Sharing<br />“Focusing exclusively on the technical issues of electronic collaboration is a sure way to a very expensive failure.”<br />“A focus on the people issues dramatically increases the potential for success.” <br /> David Coleman, IBM Manager, San Francisco in Knowledge Management, a Real Business Guide, London: IBM, nd.<br />30<br />
  38. 38. KM Modules: Learner & Communicator<br />The Learning and Communication Process Model<br />Innovation is a way of life<br />Flexibility and the ability to act quickly is necessary in a changing environment<br />New projects can benefit from alliances and learning from in-house experts and creative thinkers.<br />31<br />
  39. 39. KM Modules: Learner & Communicator<br />KM: Learning and Communication Process<br />KM is an effort to capture not only explicit factual information but also the tacit information and knowledge that exists in an organization, usually based on the experience and learning of individual employees, in order to advance the organization's mission. The eventual goal is to share knowledge among members of the organization.<br />32<br />
  40. 40. Collection<br />Navigation<br />Value to Organization<br />Active Knowledge Transfer<br />Expert Knowledge Base<br />Contact Links<br />Expert Assistance as Needed<br />Communities of Practice Index<br />Repositories<br />Best Practices<br />Reports<br />Documents<br />Presentation Slides<br />Tips<br />Organizational <br />Learning<br />Decision Making Tools<br />Profiles for Customization<br />Pushed Reports & News<br />Collaboration Tools<br />Communication<br />Codification<br />33<br />
  41. 41. KM Modules: Learner & Communicator<br />Communication Staff as knowledge mangers<br />Those who have studied communication have key skills and understandings that put them in a position to be able to help others learn, build and share knowledge.<br />Technology and information staff also have skills, knowledge and abilities that can contribute to KM efforts.<br />KM is intrinsically an interdisciplinary field and particularly well suited for team work.<br />34<br />
  42. 42. KM role in Corporations<br />Is there a KM role for information and communication professionals beyond the corporation?<br />Consider:<br />Universities<br />Health Care<br />Government<br />Education<br />Libraries<br />NGO’s (Red Cross, United Way, Foundations, etc.)<br />35<br />
  43. 43. So…what is KM?Here’s another definition:*<br />Knowledge management (KM) is an effort to increase useful knowledge within the organization. Ways to do this include: <br />encouraging communication,<br />offering opportunities to learn, and<br />promoting the sharing of appropriate knowledge artifacts<br />(This is the instructor’s own definition, but not necessarily the best or most definitive one.)<br />36<br />Knowledge Management: Another Thought<br />*Throughout the term’s work in readings and discussions, you will see additional definitions of KM. Consider keeping them in your journal or in a Word file to use in writing your position statement and your term paper.<br />
  44. 44. “Processing data can be performed by machine, but only the human mind can process knowledge or even information.”<br />Jesse Shera in Machlup and Mansfield’s <br />The Study of Information: Interdisciplinary<br />Messages. NY: Wiley, 1983.<br />37<br />Knowledge Management: Another Thought<br />
  45. 45. For more information<br />ASIS KM Website<br />http://www.asis.org/SIG/sigkm/resources.html Journal of Knowledge Management Practice<br />http://www.tlainc.com/jkmp.htm<br />Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management <br />http://www.ejkm.com/<br />Brint.com Knowledge Portal<br />http://www.brint.com/<br />Knowledge Management Resource Center <br />http://www.kmresource.com/exp_university.htm<br />38<br />

×