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Science of-vroom-johnsons-baby-9.18

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Science of-vroom-johnsons-baby-9.18

  1. 1. The Science of Powered by MIND IN THE MAKING Ellen Galinsky | Families and Work Institute September, 2014 1 ™ DO NOT USE WITHOUT PERMISSION
  2. 2. In the first years, trillions of neural connections are made – forming the foundation for future learning. 2 The architecture of the brain is being built from the ground up, based not just on genes but our experiences and interactions. STARTING AT THE BEGINNING: BRAIN BUILDING BASICS WITH SAM WANG © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  3. 3. PROMOTING POSITIVE RELATIONSHIPS © 2014 Families and Work Institute 3 An Essential Strategy In Improving Children’s Learning
  4. 4. Positive relationships with caring adults are essential for brain development. 4 “When we talk about how the environment affects young children, we're really talking about most importantly the human environment and we're talking about relationships. There is no healthy social, emotional and cognitive progression in the absence of relationships. There is no development without relationships!” —Jack P. Shonkoff, Harvard University © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  5. 5. PROMOTING SERVE AND RETURN © 2014 Families and Work Institute 5 An Essential Strategy In Improving Children’s Learning
  6. 6. HOW CHILDREN LEARN LANGUAGE Patricia Kuhl 6 © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  7. 7. PROMOTING EXECUTIVE FUNCTION SKILLS © 2014 Families and Work Institute 7 An Essential Strategy In Improving Children’s Learning
  8. 8. 8 “Executive function refers to the top-down neurocognitive processes involved in the flexible, goal-directed problem solving.” —Zelazo et al., 2008 “Executive function involves managing thought, action and emotion to achieve goals.” —Miyake et al., 2000 © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  9. 9. What are executive function skills? 9 FOCUS: being able to pay attention; WORKING MEMORY: being able to keep information in mind in order to use it; COGNITIVE FLEXIBILITY: being able to adjust to shifting needs and demands; INHIBITORY CONTROL: being able to resist the temptation to go on automatic and do what we need to do to achieve our goals. © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  10. 10. As children grow older, these skills include reflecting, analyzing, planning and evaluating. It’s never too late.
  11. 11. EXECUTIVE FUNCTION LIFE SKILLS 11 © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  12. 12. Executive function life skills are important to school readiness and school success. 12 © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  13. 13. 13 WORKING PAPER 1111 “Executive function skills are crucial building Building the Brain’s “Air Traffic Control” System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function © 2014 Families and Work Institute blocks for the early development of both cognitive and social capacities.”
  14. 14. 14 © 2014 Families and Work Institute Self control skills are predictive of early math and reading ability, independent of intelligence. —Blair and Razza, 2007
  15. 15. Executive function life skills are important in addressing high school success. 15 © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  16. 16. 16 © 2014 Families and Work Institute Delayed gratification in preschool is a precursor of this skill years later. —Eigsti et al, 2006
  17. 17. Executive function life skills are important in addressing college success and the graduation rate. 17 © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  18. 18. 18 © 2014 Families and Work Institute Self-control predicts college students’ grades, fewer impulse control problems, better adjustment and better relationships. —Tangney et al., 2004 High Self-Control Predicts Good Adjustment, Less Pathology, Better Grades, and Interpersonal Success June P. Tangney George Mason University Roy F. Baumeister Case Western Reserve University Angie Luzio Boone George Mason University ABSTRACT What good is self-control? We incorporated a new measure of individual differences in self-control into two large investigations of a broad spectrum of behaviors. The new scale showed good internal consistency and retest reliability. Higher scores on self-control correlated with a higher grade point average, better adjustment (fewer reports of psychopathology, higher self-esteem), less binge eating and alcohol abuse, better relationships and interpersonal skills, secure attachment, and more optimal emotional responses. Tests for curvilinearity failed to indicate any drawbacks of so-called overcontrol, and the positive effects remained after controlling for social desirability. Low self-control is thus a significant risk factor for a broad range of personal and interpersonal problems. June P. Tangney and Angie Luzio Boone, Department of Psychology George Mason University; Roy F. Baumeister, Department of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University. This research was supported by a research grant from the John Templeton Foundation and by research grant #MH-57039 from the National Institutes of Health. We thank Ronda Dearing for assistance with data analysis. Address correspondence to June P. Tangney, Dept. of Psychology, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax VA, 22030-4444. Journal of Personality 72:2, April 2004. Blackwell Publishing 2004
  19. 19. 19 © 2014 Families and Work Institute One aspect of executive function skills in four-year- olds—“attention span persistence”—is strongly predictive of whether or not these same children graduated from college when they were 25 years old. —McClelland et al., 2012 The statistics are dramatic : “Children who were rated one standard deviation higher on attention span-persistence at age 4 had 48.7% greater odds of completing college by age 25.” —McClelland, Oregon State University
  20. 20. If we are going to make a difference in school readiness, school success, workforce readiness and workforce success, executive function life skills are a strong place to intervene… 20 © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  21. 21. 21 © 2014 Families and Work Institute … because research shows that they CAN be improved. —Diamond and Lee, 2011
  22. 22. 1. Look 2. Chat 3. Follow 4. Stretch 5. Take Turns 22 Make eye contact so you and your child are focused on each other. Talk about the things you see, hear and do together, explaining what’s happening. Take your child’s lead by responding to their words and actions; you can ask questions like “remember when...?” or “what do you think...?” Make each moment bigger by elaborating upon what your child does and says. With sounds, words, faces and actions, go back and forth to create a conversation or a game. Vroom Brain Building Basics
  23. 23. 23 1. Look Make eye contact with children so caregivers and children are focused on each other. Age: 0 – 1 year © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  24. 24. 24 2. Chat Talk with children about the things they see, hear, and do, explaining what’s happening. Age: 2 – 4 years © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  25. 25. 25 3. Follow Take a child’s lead by responding to their words and actions; ask follow-up questions like, “what do you think?” or “why did you like that?” Age: 0 – 1 year © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  26. 26. 26 4. Stretch Make each moment bigger by elaborating upon what children do and say. Age: 3 – 4 years © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  27. 27. 27 5. Take Turns With sounds, words, faces, and actions, parents can go back and forth to create a conversation or game with children. Age: 3 – 5 years © 2014 Families and Work Institute
  28. 28. The Science of Powered by MIND IN THE MAKING Ellen Galinsky | Families and Work Institute September, 2014 28 ™ DO NOT USE WITHOUT PERMISSION

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