The newly discovered subconscious experience and its vital role in Customer retention.

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The subconscious experience is far beyond the traditional 4 P’s of marketing and has a dramatic effect on how customers perceive their experience.

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  • The unconscious and the subconscious are vastly different, though non-psychiatric professionals often incorrectly use subconscious. In contrast to the unconscious, the subconscious mind lies just below consciousness, and it is easily accessible if attention is paid to it. For instance, you might know someone’s phone number. This information is not stored in your conscious mind, but in your subconscious. If you think about it, you can produce the phone number, but it isn’t simply floating around in your conscious mind. You need to direct your attention to memory in order to dredge up the phone number. Those memories you can recall easily are not conscious unless you pay attention and focus. When someone asks you to describe your perfect day, you reach into your subconscious mind for these memories. However, if someone asked you to describe the worst day you ever had, especially if it was particularly traumatic, you might not really be able to describe the worst. You’d be able to discuss memories in your subconscious that were memorably bad, but a truly traumatic day could be in part, or completely repressed. In this way, one of the differences between the unconscious and the subconscious is that, at least in Freud’s estimation, the unconscious worked as a protecting force on the mind, even if this protection was wrongly guided. Really finding the most traumatic day of your life might mean significant therapy to access layers of memory buried away from both from conscious and subconscious, deeply hidden in the mind.
  • The unconscious and the subconscious are vastly different, though non-psychiatric professionals often incorrectly use subconscious. In contrast to the unconscious, the subconscious mind lies just below consciousness, and it is easily accessible if attention is paid to it. For instance, you might know someone’s phone number. This information is not stored in your conscious mind, but in your subconscious. If you think about it, you can produce the phone number, but it isn’t simply floating around in your conscious mind. You need to direct your attention to memory in order to dredge up the phone number. Those memories you can recall easily are not conscious unless you pay attention and focus. When someone asks you to describe your perfect day, you reach into your subconscious mind for these memories. However, if someone asked you to describe the worst day you ever had, especially if it was particularly traumatic, you might not really be able to describe the worst. You’d be able to discuss memories in your subconscious that were memorably bad, but a truly traumatic day could be in part, or completely repressed. In this way, one of the differences between the unconscious and the subconscious is that, at least in Freud’s estimation, the unconscious worked as a protecting force on the mind, even if this protection was wrongly guided. Really finding the most traumatic day of your life might mean significant therapy to access layers of memory buried away from both from conscious and subconscious, deeply hidden in the mind.
  • A subliminal message is a signal or message embedded in another medium, designed to pass below the normal limits of the human mind’s perception. These messages are unrecognizable by the conscious mind, but in certain situations can affect the subconscious mind and can negatively or positively influence subsequent later thoughts, behaviors, actions, attitudes, belief systems and value systems. The term subliminal means "beneath a limen" (sensory threshold). This is from the Latin words sub, meaning under, and limen, meaning threshold. Perception Without Awareness Perception without awareness is the implanting of an idea without the subject being aware of it. An everyday example of this priming in action is when someone whistles a tune and then sometime later you start to whistle the same tune. A third party observing the two of you would see exactly what happened. But you remain oblivious to the way the tune entered your mind. You might not even remember your friend whistling it first. In 1999 Adrian North, David Hargreaves and Jennifer Mckendrick of the University of Leicester staged a psychology experiment in a wine shop. They found that when French music was played in the shop 77% of the wine sold that day was French. When German music was played 73% of the wine sold on that day was German. The nationality of the music was changed on alternate days over a two week period. When questioned after their purchases 86% of the customers said categorically that the music did not affect their choice. In a later experiment Dr North showed that music could also be used to significantly to prime the sense of taste. In this situation a wine tasting was held against a background of different types of music. Wine tasted against a background of powerful and heavy music was described as heavy. At the other extreme, wine tasted against a background of soft mellow music was described as mellow. The subject's perception of taste had been unknowingly altered by the music they heard. The extent to which people can be primed by the words they read has been shown by several experiments, notably one by Bargh, Chen and Burrows in 1996. Subjects studied sets of words and unscrambled them to make sentences. Half of the subjects had sentences with many words that related to stereotypes of old age: slow, wrinkled, feeble etc. The other subjects had neutral words. When they completed their scrambled sentence test walked down a corridor to deliver their paper. The subjects primed with words relating to old age, walked far slower along the corridor than their colleagues as if they had taken on an aspect of the words they were reading. 3 years ago taste test MRI scans – treacted to brands coke and pepsi – lower brain (freud theory)
  • Packaging brandingv
  • The newly discovered subconscious experience and its vital role in Customer retention.

    1. 1. The newly discovered role of the subconscious experience in customer retention Steven Walden
    2. 2. Agenda
    3. 3. Agenda
    4. 4. The Subconscious is Located Beneath Conscious Awareness 4Ps rational understanding Subconscious & Emotional understanding CSAT Implicit measures
    5. 5. Traditional Research Fails to Measure the Subconscious 4Ps rational understanding Subconscious & Emotional understanding CSAT Implicit measures
    6. 6. Intention – Left brain Behaviour – Right brain Traditional research Subconscious research
    7. 7. Subconscious Experiences Are All Around Us
    8. 8. The Subconscious Works Through Experience Clues
    9. 9. Decisions are Not Just Rational! Confirmed By Neuroscience and Nobel Prize Winner <ul><li>The rational model is one in which the beliefs and desires are supposed to be determined. We were real believers in decision analysis 30 years ago, and now we must admit that decision analysis hasn’t held up </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Professor Daniel Kahneman (winner 2002 Nobel Prize for Economics) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Emotions are in the loop of reason </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Professor Antonio Damasio </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. How Subconscious Research is Currently Conducted
    11. 11. Agenda
    12. 12. Objective <ul><li>Confirm link </li></ul><ul><li>To discover if there is a link between the subconscious feelings of consumers and retention i.e., tenure and £ per month </li></ul><ul><li>Understand link </li></ul><ul><li>To discover how these subconscious feelings communicate to high retention clients and consumers </li></ul>
    13. 13. Background – Harvard and Jung ‘ … the IAT is based on the assumption that it will be easier to respond to concepts that are strongly associated than to weakly associated concepts…’ Fazio and Olson, 2003 ..so, the higher the speed of association a word has with a brand logo the more we can say it is subconsciously associated with it…..….. ‘ … Carl Jung theorized that …people connect ideas, feelings, experiences, by way of associations… these influence behaviour’ Project Implicit, Harvard University
    14. 14. You Say Mother…. I say Father.. Speed of Response Counts <ul><li>Happy </li></ul><ul><li>Pleased </li></ul><ul><li>Satisfied </li></ul><ul><li>Contented </li></ul><ul><li>Excited </li></ul><ul><li>Cared for </li></ul><ul><li>Interested </li></ul><ul><li>In control </li></ul><ul><li>Important </li></ul><ul><li>Influential </li></ul>Good emotions <ul><li>Annoyed </li></ul><ul><li>Sad </li></ul><ul><li>Unhappy </li></ul><ul><li>Despairing </li></ul><ul><li>Bored </li></ul><ul><li>Sluggish </li></ul><ul><li>Submissive </li></ul><ul><li>Dominated </li></ul>Bad emotions <ul><li>Irritated </li></ul><ul><li>Hurried </li></ul><ul><li>Neglected </li></ul><ul><li>Unsatisfied </li></ul><ul><li>Stressed </li></ul><ul><li>Disappointment </li></ul><ul><li>Frustrated </li></ul><ul><li>Interesting </li></ul><ul><li>Energetic </li></ul><ul><li>Stimulated </li></ul><ul><li>Exploratory </li></ul><ul><li>Indulgent </li></ul><ul><li>Trusting </li></ul><ul><li>Valued </li></ul><ul><li>Focused </li></ul><ul><li>Safe </li></ul>cartoonstock,.com
    15. 15. Subliminal Response to Brand identity - useful for Packaging and Logo Design Fastest response Slowest response
    16. 16. Agenda
    17. 17. We Profile the Emotions By Speed of Response Fast Slow POSITIVE emotions Fast Slow Blue Chip Brand In Blue: Lower the bar the quicker the emotional response NEGATIVE emotions Other Brands In Orange: Higher the bar the slower the emotional response Full sample profile Non-buyers profile Milliseconds Milliseconds Blue chip mobile brand Neutral brands – the benchmark neutral line
    18. 18. Retention is Subconsciously Felt: There is Tribal Loyalty Fast Slow <ul><li>All (Non-buyers and buyers) associate POSITIVE emotions more ‘quickly’ with the blue-chip Mobile Provider than the neutral brand set </li></ul><ul><li>They are saying: ‘I recognise this provider and even though I don’t buy it I like mobiles’ </li></ul><ul><li>EVERYONE LIKES MOBILES </li></ul>POSITIVE emotions Blue Chip Mobile Brand Other Mobile Brands Full sample profile Milliseconds
    19. 19. Retention is Subconsciously Felt: There is Tribal Loyalty <ul><li>Non- buyers of the blue-chip brand associate the NEGATIVE emotions more ‘quickly’ with the blue-chip Mobile Provider </li></ul><ul><li>They recognise the provider </li></ul><ul><li>They dislike the provider more than you would expect </li></ul><ul><li>I DISLIKE MOBILES - ‘NOT MY BRAND’ </li></ul>Fast Slow NEGATIVE emotions Milliseconds Non-Buyers profile Blue Chip Mobile Brand Other Mobile Brands
    20. 20. Attitude Scores Hide Subconsciously Held ‘True Feelings’ f =12 models 90% statistical significance; PLS <ul><li>12 different scenarios to test the data (e.g., raw time, raw time in bands of 0-10 et al.) </li></ul><ul><li>Satisfaction </li></ul><ul><li>Recommendation </li></ul><ul><li>Preference </li></ul><ul><li>Expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Continuation of use </li></ul>POSITIVE SUBCONSCIOUS EMOTIONS NEGATIVE SUBCONSCIOUS EMOTIONS NEUTRAL EFFECT NEUTRAL EFFECT
    21. 21. Attitude Scores Need Feelings Because… they do not feel subconsciously satisfied
    22. 22. Retention is Driven by Positive Subconscious Feelings! Normally, no link is found or <5% Tenure is not usually as highly explained Retention Effects Positive Emotions Behaviour (£per month) 44% Tenure 56% <ul><li>Retention (Tenure and spend - £s per month) </li></ul>POSITIVE SUBCONSCIOUS EMOTIONS NEGATIVE SUBCONSCIOUS EMOTIONS DRIVE NEUTRAL EFFECT
    23. 23. The Magic Dust of Research: The Link to Retention– Subconscious Loyalty <ul><li>The more retained (tenure and spend) the more subconsciously attached I am to your brand experience </li></ul><ul><li>The more retained (tenure and spend) with another brand the more there is a subconsciously felt ‘detachment’ from you </li></ul>
    24. 24. We Put a Value on the Subconscious Retention emotions!
    25. 25.
    26. 26. “ Gut-Reaction” Drives Consumer Decision-Making <ul><li>‘ One figure which always surprises people is that the subconscious processes 200,000 times more information than the conscious mind without us having to focus on it and does that processing before our eyes have even recognised the person or object. It is disposed to process emotions even faster, around 10 times faster than our conscious mind’. </li></ul><ul><li>Dr Peter Jones </li></ul>
    27. 27. Based on Our Results What Should We Do Next?
    28. 28. Step 1: Define Which Subconscious Emotions Link to Value The brand feels/acts like… Link to Value Cared for, pleased, in control Retention - Tenure
    29. 29. Step 1: Define Which Subconscious Emotions Link to Value The brand feels/acts like… Link to Value Cared for, pleased, in control Happy and pleased Retention - Tenure Retention Spend per month
    30. 30. Step 1: Define Which Subconscious Emotions Link to Value The brand feels/acts like… Link to Value Cared for, pleased, in control Happy and pleased Unhappy, annoyed, sluggish, submissive Retention - Tenure Retention Spend per month Conscious Attitudes
    31. 31. Step 2: Understand What This Means Subconsciously Cared for, pleased, in control Happy and pleased Unhappy, annoyed, sluggish, submissive Subconscious feel says ‘fun’ but executed in a poor way Subconscious feel says ‘care’ and executed in an excellent way Subconscious feel says we are scared, we don’t know what to do or how to do it! (pre-2009) Our blue-chip customer feels the brand is Possible Examples
    32. 32. Step 3: Reposition Your Subconscious Experience The Blue-Chip Company should…. Possible Examples Cared for, pleased, in control Happy and pleased Unhappy, annoyed, sluggish, submissive Subconscious feel says ‘fun’ but executed in a poor way Subconscious feel says ‘care’ and executed in an excellent way Subconscious feel says we are scared, we don’t know what to do or how to do it! (pre-2009)
    33. 33. Possible Examples of Subconscious Roles Beyond Philosophy Full Model NEGATIVE DOMINANCE Subconscious feel from media reports says: ‘big bad corporation’ The ‘Power’ emotions are important in the Subconscious Experience hypothesis Happy and pleased Unhappy, annoyed, sluggish, submissive Cared for, pleased, in control Subconscious feel says ‘fun’ but executed in a poor way Subconscious feel says ‘care’ and executed in an excellent way Subconscious feel says we are scared, we don’t know what to do or how to do it! (pre-2009)
    34. 34. Why Bother? <ul><li>The Subconscious Experience drives and destroys the value you get from retention: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We have seen how ..Subconscious positive emotions drive retention behaviour : they affirm our beliefs when we have ‘skin in the game’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>We have seen how .. Consciously measured Attitude (e.g., satisfaction) hides consumers ‘true’ subconsciously held feelings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>We have seen how .. Retained buyers feel subconsciously different to non-buyers i.e., there is a subconscious barrier to change </li></ul></ul><ul><li>By focusing on Subconscious feelings you are using a unique competitive differentiator; be one of the first to focus on this ! </li></ul>By using IAT you can understand your subconscious experience and manage this for growth….. This can be your competitive difference
    35. 35. Recommendations <ul><li>It is critical to understand how the subconscious impacts your experience </li></ul><ul><li>Use IAT to understand this </li></ul><ul><li>Design a new emotionally engaging experience around the subconscious </li></ul><ul><li>Use Moment Mapping® / Emotional Signature® to do this </li></ul>
    36. 36. More Info Presenter: Steven Walden [email_address] Tel: 0207 917 1717 Beyond Philosophy www.beyondphilosophy.com

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