Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

How We Get Feedback Wrong

514 views

Published on

After decades of attempts by thousands of companies to improve how managers give feedback, research still suggests that feedback does nothing – or even makes things worse. The session launches an extensive research project to finally transform the entire concept and implementation of "feedback." Prepare to be surprised, it turns out many things we've been told about feedback are wrong. Presented by Dr. David Rock, Director of the NeuroLeadership Institute, at Goal Summit 2017.

Published in: Recruiting & HR
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

How We Get Feedback Wrong

  1. 1. RETHINK FEEDBACK Dr. David Rock
  2. 2. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute About the NLI A research-driven leadership institute, building a new language for leadership since 1998. 2
  3. 3. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute Performance Three practice areas Transform performance by lifting the quality of conversations Diversity & Inclusion Move the needle on today's diversity and inclusion challenges. Learning & Change Accelerate and embed new behaviors through brain-based learning strategies. 3
  4. 4. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute Trends: 2016 4
  5. 5. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute Results • Conversation quality improves • Conversation frequency rises • Employee engagement goes up • Pay differentiation increases • Yes, it is worth the investment 5
  6. 6. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute The one thing everyone agrees on… It’s all about the quality of the conversations 6
  7. 7. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute 1. Goal setting 2. Everyday feedback 3. Regular check-ins against goals 4. End of cycle reviews 5. Compensation conversations 6. Career conversations ? The ‘big 6’ conversations 7
  8. 8. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute Kluger & DeNisi (1996) Is it time for a feedback revolution? Feedback does nothing, or makes things worse, more often than it improves performance. 8
  9. 9. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute The current (implicit) hypothesis Managers need to be reminded, encouraged, cajoled into giving more feedback, and trained to do so. Yet, after over 40 years of training programs, this is still a huge problem globally. 9
  10. 10. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute A number of common perceptions about feedback are wrong. What our RESEARCH found 10
  11. 11. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute MISTAKE 1: We think we hate feedback “Can I give you some feedback?” What they say: 11
  12. 12. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute MISTAKE 1: We think we hate feedback What we hear: “Can I criticize your work so I can feel better about myself?” 12
  13. 13. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute MISTAKE 1: We think we hate feedback 13
  14. 14. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute MISTAKE 1: We think we hate feedback We think we hate feedback… Yet perhaps we just don’t like it when it comes unsolicited from other people. 14
  15. 15. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute It’s best to focus on errors We are built to detect errors, so that’s how we focus MISTAKE 2: We believe: Poor performance is from not knowing one’s errors People will change once informed of an error 15
  16. 16. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute It’s best to focus on errors Yes, it can be helpful to outline errors. MISTAKE 2: Yet, without knowing what to do more of, we can over-focus on what not to do. 16
  17. 17. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute Feedback must be giver-driven MISTAKE 3: In the old world of work, managers knew more 17
  18. 18. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute Feedback must be giver-driven MISTAKE 3: In the old world of work, managers knew more Prosocial motivation: It feels good to feel helpful 18
  19. 19. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute Feedback must be giver-driven MISTAKE 3: In the old world of work, managers knew more Prosocial motivation: It feels good to feel helpful Status & autonomy boost to the giver The “I told you so” effect 19
  20. 20. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute A NEW approach 20
  21. 21. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute A NEW approach 21
  22. 22. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute 1. Both sides feel less threatened 2. You get feedback more quickly and regularly 3. You can ask many people, reducing bias 4. You can get the specific feedback you need ... Asking is better for you 22
  23. 23. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute What to build on Where to refocus Getting specific feedback Ask for both types: 23
  24. 24. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute What happens now Someone presents poorly to a client Feedback from one person, often well after the fact. It’s uncomfortable for both, often too general or too detailed. The feedback is easily discarded for being biased. 24
  25. 25. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute What happens now Someone presents poorly to a client Feedback sought from 2-3 people. Immediately. Uncomfortable but manageably so. Receiver gets the exact information needed, and can try to improve immediately. 25
  26. 26. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute Mental Contrasting Mental contrasting engages prefrontal, temporal, and occipital areas; significantly greater activity than indulging in positive fantasies. Achtziger, A., Fehr, T., Oettingen, G., Gollwitzer, P. & Rockstroh, B. 26
  27. 27. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute • Start from the top • Emphasize this is what top performers do • Show people clearly what this looks like • Build into work streams and technology ... How do we get everyone asking? ?? 27
  28. 28. © 2017 NeuroLeadership Institute June 13 | Santa Clara, CA 28
  29. 29. Thank you

×