Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Living traditions in urban art:
Portuguese pavement art, 
the “Calçada Portuguesa” 
& the practice of tile painting or
“Az...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013
Stone pavement is an art 
with a long history. Romans 
are the most we...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
One of the most important reasons 
for this kind of pavement was to 
prevent mud on the floor and 
streets because the spa...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
In 1842, military commander Eusebius 
Furtado ordered inmates in the Castelo
de São Jorge, a Lisbon prison, to cover 
its ...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
Seven years later, Furtado was 
given a commission to pave the 
whole area of Rossio Square, in 
Lisbon centre, with a wav...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
Until the early 20th century, designs were made by the 
craftsmen themselves, the "calceteiros", that were 
inspired by tr...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
The mosaics require backbreaking 
labour to maintain, making the 
traditional art of the calceteiros both 
rare and expens...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
In November 1986, the Lisbon City 
Council created the School of 
pavers in order to renew the actual 
crew of pavers and ...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
Tiles (called azulejos) are 
everywhere in Portugal. They 
decorate everything from walls of 
churches and monasteries, to...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
Although they are not a 
Portuguese invention (the use of 
glazed tiles began in Egypt), they 
have been used more 
imagin...
After the Gothic period, most 
large buildings had extensive areas 
of flat plaster on their interior 
walls, which needed...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
The term azulejo comes from the Arabic 
word az‐zulayj, meaning "polished stone." 
The Moors brought this term to the Iber...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
Gradually the Portuguese painters weaned 
themselves off ornam...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
Photos by Artfully
Text from:
Portuguese pavement art, the "Calçada Portuguesa"
http://margaridab.hubpages.com/hub/Portugu...
LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
www.artfully.com.au
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Artfully living traditions-in_urban_art-portugal-july2013

772 views

Published on

Photos taken in Portugal of Portuguese pavement art, the “Calçada Portuguesa” & the practice of tile painting or “Azulejo” , accompanied by brief articles.

Published in: Travel, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Artfully living traditions-in_urban_art-portugal-july2013

  1. 1. Living traditions in urban art: Portuguese pavement art,  the “Calçada Portuguesa”  & the practice of tile painting or “Azulejo” Beth Jackson, Director & Curator, Artfully LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  2. 2. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013 Stone pavement is an art  with a long history. Romans  are the most well known for  this kind of work, both  inside and outside  buildings, made with  intricate, beautiful and  colourful designs but, in  Portugal, it wasn't only the  Romans that influenced this  kind of work, Arabian  occupation of the territory,  was also important to the  development of such  techniques. artfully
  3. 3. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  4. 4. One of the most important reasons  for this kind of pavement was to  prevent mud on the floor and  streets because the space between  stones lets the rain water to be  absorbed, but there are other  advantages like its durability, and  its ease and affordability to repair. The Portuguese pavement is a  decorative art applied in most of  the sidewalks around the country  and it's former colonies.  LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  5. 5. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  6. 6. In 1842, military commander Eusebius  Furtado ordered inmates in the Castelo de São Jorge, a Lisbon prison, to cover  its courtyard with a zig‐zag pattern of  tiles. The design used on that floor was  a simple layout, but for the time, the  work was somewhat unusual, causing  the Portuguese chroniclers to write  about it and attracting so much  attention, not only in Portugal, that it  was the subject of one of the world’s  earliest photographs by Louis Daguerre.  Castelo de S. Jorge, 1842 by Louis Jaques Daguerre  LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  7. 7. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  8. 8. Seven years later, Furtado was  given a commission to pave the  whole area of Rossio Square, in  Lisbon centre, with a wavy pattern  known as “the wide sea”. After  this, the use of calçadas was made  mandatory for all new paving  projects in the Portuguese capital.  The cobblestone quickly spread  throughout the country and  colonies and Portuguese masters  were asked to perform and teach  these works abroad, creating  authentic masterpieces in  pedestrian areas.  LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  9. 9. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  10. 10. Until the early 20th century, designs were made by the  craftsmen themselves, the "calceteiros", that were  inspired by traditional motifs like armillary spheres, ships,  compass roses, ropes, crosses, crowns, crests, emblems,  ocean waves, seaweed, starfish, anchors, stylized animals  and birds, dolphins and crabs. In the fifties designs began  to be made by architects and artists. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  11. 11. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  12. 12. The mosaics require backbreaking  labour to maintain, making the  traditional art of the calceteiros both  rare and expensive. It's an arduous  labour, where long hours are spent  painstakingly laying the stones in a  prostrated position. At right: the image of the Saint Queen  Elizabeth of Portugal, in Coimbra,  designed with black and white stones of  basalt and limestone. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  13. 13. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  14. 14. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  15. 15. In November 1986, the Lisbon City  Council created the School of  pavers in order to renew the actual  crew of pavers and promoting the  art of paving. Other cities around  the country also initiated formation  projects in order to train  professional men and women,  hoping to ensure the "survival" of  cobblestone. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  16. 16. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  17. 17. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  18. 18. Tiles (called azulejos) are  everywhere in Portugal. They  decorate everything from walls of  churches and monasteries, to  palaces, ordinary houses, park  seats, fountains, shops, and  railway stations. They often  portray scenes from the history of  the country, show its most  ravishing sights, or simply serve as  street signs, nameplates, or house  numbers. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  19. 19. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  20. 20. Although they are not a  Portuguese invention (the use of  glazed tiles began in Egypt), they  have been used more  imaginatively and consistently in  Portugal than in any other nation.  They became an art form, and by  the 18th century no other  European country was producing  as many tiles for such a variety of  purposes and in so many different  designs. Today, they still remain a  very important part of the  country's architecture. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  21. 21. After the Gothic period, most  large buildings had extensive areas  of flat plaster on their interior  walls, which needed some form of  decoration. These empty  architectural spaces produced the  art of the fresco in Italy, and in  Portugal, the art of the azulejo. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  22. 22. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  23. 23. The term azulejo comes from the Arabic  word az‐zulayj, meaning "polished stone."  The Moors brought this term to the Iberian  Peninsula, but despite their long presence,  their influence in early Portuguese azulejos was actually introduced from Spain in the  15th century, well after the Christian  reconquest. No tile work from the time of  the Moorish occupation survives in  Portugal.  King Manuel I was dazzled by the  Alhambra in Granada (Spain), and decided  to have his palace in Sintra decorated with  the same rich ceramic tiles. The first ones  were imported from Seville, and in  accordance to Islamic law, they portrayed  no human figures, only geometric patterns. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  24. 24. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  25. 25. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully Gradually the Portuguese painters weaned  themselves off ornamental decoration and  employed human or animal figures in their  designs. The dominant colors were blue,  yellow, green and white, but in the 17th  century, large, carpet‐like tiles used just white  and blue, the fashionable colors at the time of  the Great Discoveries, influenced by the Ming  Dynasty porcelain from China. They now  portrayed Christian legends, historical events,  and were not only decorative, but also  protected against damp, heat and noise.
  26. 26. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  27. 27. Photos by Artfully Text from: Portuguese pavement art, the "Calçada Portuguesa" http://margaridab.hubpages.com/hub/Portuguese‐ pavement‐art‐the‐Calada‐Portuguesa# & AZULEJOS: The Art of Portuguese Ceramic Tiles http://www.golisbon.com/culture/azulejos.html LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully
  28. 28. LIVING TRADITIONS IN URBAN ART, PORTUGAL, JULY 2013artfully www.artfully.com.au

×