The SIOP model...an Overview

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Sheltered Instruction is a way to teach English Language Learners within the context of their academic classes. The SIOP model is the only research based method that effectively ensures that all students have equal access to the curriculum.

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The SIOP model...an Overview

  1. 1. The SIOP MODEL: Making Content Comprehensible for English Language Learners Presented by DHS SIOP Coaches Carla Huck and Beth Amaral February 25, 2014 ACE
  2. 2. A Team-Building Activity 1. Find three things that everyone on the team likes 2. Find three things that everyone on the team dislikes 3. Find one thing that is unique to each of the team members 4. Decide on a team name that has something to do with your collective likes and dislikes 5. Write your TEAM name on your “Table Tent”
  3. 3. Objectives Content: • Participants will be able to demonstrate understanding of the 8 components of the SIOP Model through discussion and hands-on practice activities • Participants will be able to make connections between current practice and new strategies or ideas presented. Language: • Participants will engage in speaking, listening, reading, and writing exercises using high school content area curricular materials. • Participants will be able to describe how sheltered instructional practices positively impact teaching and learning for our diverse student population
  4. 4. ELLs at ACE
  5. 5. What is SIOP? • Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol
  6. 6. 1. Lesson Preparation Teachers plan their lessons carefully, including attention to: • Content and language objectives • Appropriate content concepts • The use of supplemental materials • Adaptation of content • Meaningful activities
  7. 7. Lesson Preparation • For teachers new to the SIOP Model, the lesson planning process will incorporate a new element, which is writing specific content and language objectives for each lesson. • Content objectives are created from district and state standards, specific to the lesson being taught. • Language objectives will help students develop language proficiency and vocabulary knowledge concurrently with subject matter understandings.
  8. 8. Practical Application: Categorizing Content and Language Objectives Example: • Work with your team to categorize the given objectives on the T-chart SWBAT compare and contrast the North’s and South’s positions in the weeks preceding the first battle of the Civil War SWBAT write five sentences about the North’s and South’s positions in the weeks preceding the first battle of the Civil War
  9. 9. 2. Building Background Research supports teachers’ explicit activation of students’ prior knowledge, and the building of background for those students who may lack prior knowledge about the content topic. To fill in the gaps and help students create linkages, teachers must: • Make explicit links to their students’ background experiences and knowledge • Connect past learning and new concepts • Teach and emphasize new vocabulary
  10. 10. Building Background • Before viewing the video clip, think about what you do in your classroom to build background. Record your practices. • As you watch the video clip, jot down practices you see that relate to building background. • Reflect on your notes. What are you already doing to build background? What practices did you see in the video that you want to implement in your classroom?
  11. 11. Practical Application: Using Anticipation Guides • “Fast Food Nation” example: 1. Prior to reading your article, read the statements and check if you agree or disagree. 2. Discuss your responses with your group. Reach consensus on the agree/disagree column for the group. 3. Read the article. 4. Revise any of your responses.
  12. 12. 3. Comprehensible Input Reflect on a time when, despite teacher explanations, you just didn’t “get” what you were supposed to be learning. What could the teacher have done to make the content concepts more clear? To improve comprehensibility, we need to: • Use speech appropriate to students’ English proficiency (enunciate, slower rate) • Explain academic tasks clearly – orally and in writing • Employ a variety of techniques such as modeling, visuals, hands-on activities, scaffolding, multimedia
  13. 13. Comprehensible Input • It is important that explanations are very clear about what students are to do, and how they are to do it. When steps to processes and procedures are written, orally presented, and modeled, students will be more likely to succeed.
  14. 14. Practical Application Your team assignment: 1. You have been given a reading that you will use with your students. 2. Design a graphic organizer that matches your reading, to be used before, during and/or after reading the article. 3. Draw and complete your final version on chart paper. GALLERY WALK: View your peers’ graphic organizers and leave a sticky note indicating what you think the article is about.
  15. 15. 4. Strategies This component focuses on the cognitive and metacognitive strategies that learners use to make sense of new information and concepts. Learning strategies include re-reading, note-taking, organizing information, predicting, self-questioning, evaluating. . . etc. Teachers: • Provide students with instruction in and practice with a variety of learning strategies • Scaffold their teaching consistently with techniques to support understanding, such as think-alouds • Promote higher-order thinking through a variety of question types and levels
  16. 16. Strategies
  17. 17. Practical Application Work with a partner to complete the THIEVES organizer from your text.
  18. 18. 5. Interaction Our ELLs will not become proficient speakers of the language unless they have frequent opportunities to use it. Teachers who monopolize the vast majority of classroom talk, as is common practice, minimize opportunities for students to practice their English language skills. To encourage and promote meaningful discussion and responses about content, teachers need to provide: • Frequent opportunities for interaction and discussion from teacher-student and among students • Grouping configurations that support language and content objectives • Sufficient wait time for student responses • Ample opportunities for students to clarify key concepts in L1, as needed
  19. 19. Interaction Types of cooperative learning groups 1. Base groups: long-term groups with stable membership • Personalize the classroom, develop community • Mixed ability 2. Flexible small groups: last from 1 period to several periods to complete a specific task • Promote multiple perspectives • Members chosen to maximize learning 3. Partners: chosen ad hoc or by seating arrangement and can rotate • Provide practice opportunities • Give peer assistance before independent practice
  20. 20. Practical Application • Math Rally-Robin, “I have, who has?” • Group Response with a White Board/ PEMDAS: 1. ( 9 + 5 ) × ( 9 - 5 ) = 2. 5² × 10 -12² = 3. 3 × 9 - 5 × 2 = 4. 7 × 8 + 36 ÷ 9 = 5. 10³- (21 ÷ 7) =
  21. 21. 6. Practice and Application Students need daily opportunities to practice and apply what they are learning. They are more likely to retain new information if they immediately put it to use; and the teacher can assess students’ learning while they are practicing and applying their new understandings within each lesson. In this component, teachers provide: • Hands-on materials and/or manipulatives for students to practice using new knowledge • Activities for students to apply content and language knowledge • Activities that integrate all four language skills
  22. 22. Practice and Application • Classroom lectures and textbook readings are not enough for ELLs to master the material. • Students need to practice through multiple modalities. • Remember VKAT: (Visual, Kinesthetic, Auditory, Tactile)
  23. 23. Practical Application Step 1: GIST • Watch the video clip from Discovery Education (Fair Trade Chocolate 2:16) • Take note of 10 key terms • Turn your terms into a summary statement
  24. 24. Practical Application Step 2: CONGA LINE • Count off by twos • Form two lines of “ones” and “twos” facing each other • For 30 seconds, ones will share their GIST summary with the person across from them and how they will implement this strategy in the classroom. • After 30 seconds, the “twos” will share. • Then, the head of the line of “twos” will conga through the center to the end of the “twos” line and everyone will shift up one, giving everyone a new partner.
  25. 25. 7. Lesson Delivery Have you ever written a fabulous lesson plan, but when you taught the lesson it went differently than planned? The Lesson Delivery component focuses on this common problem by using content and language objectives to guide lesson delivery, ensuring students are engaged in meaningful activities with appropriate pacing. Teachers are asked to deliver their lessons with: • Content objectives clearly supported • Language objectives clearly supported • Students engaged 90 – 100% of the period • Pacing appropriate to students’ ability level
  26. 26. Lesson Delivery Look for evidence of these factors that contribute to high student engagement: • Well-planned lessons • Clear explanation of academic tasks or instructions • Appropriate amount of time spent on each task • Strong classroom management skills • Opportunities for students to apply learning in meaningful ways • Active student involvement • Lesson design meets the language and learning needs of students
  27. 27. Practical Application • PASS THE INDEX CARD 1. Write an upcoming topic from your curriculum. 2. Divide your card into 4 sections: reading, writing, listening, speaking 3. Write an activity in each section. 4. Pass your card to the right. 5. Add more ideas on your peers’ cards.
  28. 28. 8. Review and Assessment Although this component is the eighth in the SIOP protocol, the process of reviewing and assessing student understanding is ongoing and continuous. Best practice dictates that we assess students before, during, and after instruction and these findings guide future lesson design and delivery. Teacher actions include: • Comprehensive review of key vocabulary and concepts • Regular, specific academic feedback to students • Assessment of student comprehension and learning throughout the lesson
  29. 29. Review and Assessment Many ways to manage response rates throughout the class period: • Choral response • White boards • Response chaining • Response cards • Hand signals • Vote with your feet • Technology based (Socrative, Stick Pick app)
  30. 30. Practical Application Please complete your 3-2-1 Exit Ticket: 3 things I learned today 2 ideas I will implement in my classroom 1 strategy I would recommend to a colleague
  31. 31. Reflecting on Learning Content: • Participants will be able to demonstrate understanding of the 8 components of the SIOP Model through discussion and hands-on practice activities • Participants will be able to make connections between current practice and new strategies or ideas presented. Language: • Participants will engage in speaking, listening, reading, and writing exercises using high school content area curricular materials. • Participants will be able to describe how sheltered instructional practices positively impact teaching and learning for our diverse student population Did we meet our objectives?
  32. 32. Reflecting on Learning • Please return our formal evaluation sheets • For more information and resources, access Google Drive – SIOP Ideas folder Carla Huck huckca@danbury.k12.ct.us Beth Amaral amarae@danbury.k12.ct.us

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