By: Beth Amaral and Carla Huck
DHS SIOP Coaches


DO NOW:



Read the paragraph taken from “Exploring
American History” found at your table and
answer the following que...
 The

most violent slave revolt took place in
1831 in Virginia. It was led by Nat Turner, a
very religious man. Turner be...
 Participants

will be able to examine their
prior knowledge of second language
acquisition and correct any misconception...
 Read

the statement on the slide. Determine
if you think the statement is true or false.

 Write

either TRUE or FALSE ...
The emotional state of the
learner can interfere with the
acquisition of English.
 Anxiety

can block the leaner’s ability to
process information.
This is called the affective filter.

 Speaking

a new ...
Implications for the classroom
Teachers should:
Create a learning environment that
makes ELLs feel welcome and comfortabl...
All children learn a second
language in the same way.
 Second

language acquisition is directly
impacted by a child’s linguistic and cultural
rearing, as well as social class ...
 Some

immigrant children (from less
technologically advanced non-urbanized
societies) are taught in non-verbal means.
Th...
Implications for the classroom
Teachers need to be aware of cultural
and individual differences in learner styles.
Teach...
The more time English Language
Learners spend soaking up
English in the classroom, the
more quickly they will learn the
la...
 Language

is not “soaked up.” The learner
must understand the communication that
is conveyed by teachers.

 This

is ca...
Acquiring a New Language Requires…
 Hearing

and understanding messages from
teachers and English-speaking classmates.

...
Implications for the classroom
Teachers should…
 Deliver information to ELLs that is just
slightly above their English la...
Teachers should be concerned
about newly arrived ELLs who do
not speak any English after six
months.
New learners of English may…
 Go through a silent period.
 Be unable or unwilling to communicate
orally in English.
 Re...
Implications for the classroom
English Language Learners…
Need time to listen to others talk and to
digest what they hear...
Literacy in native language
contributes to more rapid
acquisition of English.
 The

most significant variable in how quickly
ELLs reach grade-level norms is their level of
literacy in their native la...
Implications for the classroom:
ELLs will acquire new concepts easily in
English if they already understand it in their
n...
A lot of immigrant children have
learning disabilities, not
language problems. They speak
English just fine but they are
s...
 There

are different levels of language
proficiency.
 Students may appear to speak English with
no problem “in the hall...
 Comprise

the social language students
learn to function in the
classroom, hallways, cafeteria, and on
the school bus.

...
 Refers

to the language of formal
academic learning.

 Is

the language of written texts in content
areas such as math ...
Implications for the classroom
Schools must…
Be careful of exiting students from language
support programs too soon.
Rea...
Until students learn
English, there is no point in
trying to teach them content
area subjects.
 ESL

students need to continue their
content education.
 Secondary students have the greatest
likelihood of achieving e...
Implications for the classroom
Sheltered instruction (SIOP) is an
approach in which ELLs can participate in a
content cou...
Effective teaching practices for
ELLs also benefit native speaking
students.
 Effective

practices for
ELLs are grounded in
professional literature
and in the experience and
best practices of all te...
Implications for the
classroom
What makes an effective teacher?
1: Interest and explanation
2: Concern and respect for stu...
Researchers cannot agree on the
most effective programs for ESL
students.
Based on the literature, ALL effective ESL
programs have the following:











Values the cultural identity of t...
Implications for the classroom
Effective classroom instruction for ELLs
should…
Be comprehensible to all learners
Be int...
Think, Pair, Share!
What strategies/tools are you
currently using to support your ELL
students?
CELEBRATING SUCCESS --- CAUGHT IN THE ACT OF
SIOP
Reflecting on Learning
Rate yourself 1-3, how well did you meet the
objectives today?
1. I can teach the concept to someon...
Mythbusters of second language acquisition revised
Mythbusters of second language acquisition revised
Mythbusters of second language acquisition revised
Mythbusters of second language acquisition revised
Mythbusters of second language acquisition revised
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Mythbusters of second language acquisition revised

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This PPT was used with High School teachers to make participants aware of what they know and should know about how ELLs learn English.

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Mythbusters of second language acquisition revised

  1. 1. By: Beth Amaral and Carla Huck DHS SIOP Coaches
  2. 2.  DO NOW:  Read the paragraph taken from “Exploring American History” found at your table and answer the following questions independently on your paper. What happened in 1831?  Why is this important?   You will be asked to share your answers in 5 minutes. Be ready!
  3. 3.  The most violent slave revolt took place in 1831 in Virginia. It was led by Nat Turner, a very religious man. Turner believed that God had chosen him to lead his people to freedom. The Nat Turner uprising did much to end any idea Whites might have had that Blacks were happy being slaves.  taken from “Exploring American History”
  4. 4.  Participants will be able to examine their prior knowledge of second language acquisition and correct any misconceptions.  Participants will be able to identify characteristics of second language learners.  Participants will be able to apply acquired knowledge and strategies in their own classrooms to improve student achievement.
  5. 5.  Read the statement on the slide. Determine if you think the statement is true or false.  Write either TRUE or FALSE on your whiteboard.  When everyone is ready, we will ask you to show your response.
  6. 6. The emotional state of the learner can interfere with the acquisition of English.
  7. 7.  Anxiety can block the leaner’s ability to process information. This is called the affective filter.  Speaking a new language requires that the student takes risks.  Students who are upset, scared or anxious will raise the affective filter.
  8. 8. Implications for the classroom Teachers should: Create a learning environment that makes ELLs feel welcome and comfortable. Look for signs of stress build-up and provide encouragement Compliment positive behavior and work Use mild, consistent consequences Allow legitimate opportunity to move about the room Provide short breaks between activities/assignments
  9. 9. All children learn a second language in the same way.
  10. 10.  Second language acquisition is directly impacted by a child’s linguistic and cultural rearing, as well as social class differences.  Schools in America use language as a way to communicate meaning, convey information, to control social behavior, and to solve problems(style of talk is analytic and deductive). Children are rewarded for clear and logical thinking.
  11. 11.  Some immigrant children (from less technologically advanced non-urbanized societies) are taught in non-verbal means. They are taught through observation, supervised participation, and self initiated repetition.  Children in some cultures are more accustomed to learning from peers rather than from adults; others are used to lecture.  Researchers have identified nine different types of ELLs who have unique needs.
  12. 12. Implications for the classroom Teachers need to be aware of cultural and individual differences in learner styles. Teachers should use a variety of instructional activities—small group work, cooperative learning, peer tutoring, individualized instruction. Effective classroom activities affirm the values of the home culture and develop a child’s positive emotional attitude toward their background.
  13. 13. The more time English Language Learners spend soaking up English in the classroom, the more quickly they will learn the language.
  14. 14.  Language is not “soaked up.” The learner must understand the communication that is conveyed by teachers.  This is called comprehensible input.
  15. 15. Acquiring a New Language Requires…  Hearing and understanding messages from teachers and English-speaking classmates.  Receiving a message that is slightly above current English language level.
  16. 16. Implications for the classroom Teachers should…  Deliver information to ELLs that is just slightly above their English language level.  Include visuals, graphs, organizers, photographs , and maps to support the language in a lesson.  Simplify language of instruction without watering down the key concepts.  Teach through multi-sensory modes  Make sure directions are understood (model frequently)
  17. 17. Teachers should be concerned about newly arrived ELLs who do not speak any English after six months.
  18. 18. New learners of English may…  Go through a silent period.  Be unable or unwilling to communicate orally in English.  Remain in this stage for a few days or more than a year.
  19. 19. Implications for the classroom English Language Learners… Need time to listen to others talk and to digest what they hear. Need time to develop receptive vocabulary. Should not be forced to speak before they are ready. *Unwillingness to speak does not mean ELLs are not learning.
  20. 20. Literacy in native language contributes to more rapid acquisition of English.
  21. 21.  The most significant variable in how quickly ELLs reach grade-level norms is their level of literacy in their native language (Thomas and Collier, 1997).  Students with little or no academic and cognitive development in their first language do less and less well as they move into the upper grades.
  22. 22. Implications for the classroom: ELLs will acquire new concepts easily in English if they already understand it in their native language. Teachers should encourage parents and students to use their native language at home. Schools should never tell parents that they must speak English at home.
  23. 23. A lot of immigrant children have learning disabilities, not language problems. They speak English just fine but they are still failing academically.
  24. 24.  There are different levels of language proficiency.  Students may appear to speak English with no problem “in the hallways with friends” but in class, they just don’t seem to grasp the concepts.  Many immigrant children have been misdiagnosed in the past as “learning disabled,” when in fact people misunderstood their fluency with social vs. academic language.
  25. 25.  Comprise the social language students learn to function in the classroom, hallways, cafeteria, and on the school bus.  Takes from one to three years to acquire.
  26. 26.  Refers to the language of formal academic learning.  Is the language of written texts in content areas such as math or science.  Requires achieve. three to seven years or longer to
  27. 27. Implications for the classroom Schools must… Be careful of exiting students from language support programs too soon. Realize that an ELL who is proficient in social language may not be able to understand the academic content of the classroom. Be aware that there are ELLs with learning disabilities, but they are more difficult to diagnose. These are often students who have been in the US for several years but have not progressed in language proficiency, e.g. LAS Links 1 score for several years.
  28. 28. Until students learn English, there is no point in trying to teach them content area subjects.
  29. 29.  ESL students need to continue their content education.  Secondary students have the greatest likelihood of achieving education success if they receive appropriate English language and content instruction simultaneously.  In the study of content, students interact in English with meaningful material that is relevant to their schooling.
  30. 30. Implications for the classroom Sheltered instruction (SIOP) is an approach in which ELLs can participate in a content course with grade-level objectives delivered through modified instruction that makes the information comprehensible to the students. The SIOP Model has a dual purpose: to systematically and consistently teach both content and language in every lesson.
  31. 31. Effective teaching practices for ELLs also benefit native speaking students.
  32. 32.  Effective practices for ELLs are grounded in professional literature and in the experience and best practices of all teachers  These practices are beneficial to ALL students but ESSENTIAL for ELLs
  33. 33. Implications for the classroom What makes an effective teacher? 1: Interest and explanation 2: Concern and respect for students and student learning 3: Appropriate assessment and feedback 4: Clear goals and intellectual challenge 5: Independence, control and active engagement 6: Learning from students Excerpted from Effective Teaching: Six Keys to Success, The Teaching Professor, March 2006. http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/effective-teaching-strategies-six-keys-to-classroom-excellence/
  34. 34. Researchers cannot agree on the most effective programs for ESL students.
  35. 35. Based on the literature, ALL effective ESL programs have the following:       Values the cultural identity of the student Has high expectations for the ESL students Integrates language and content Provides ongoing PD for ESL and content teachers Supports whole school inclusion Promotes collaboration among teachers
  36. 36. Implications for the classroom Effective classroom instruction for ELLs should… Be comprehensible to all learners Be interactive Connect school to students’ lives Promote cross-cultural understanding Develop language and literacy across the curriculum Help all students achieve learning outcomes
  37. 37. Think, Pair, Share! What strategies/tools are you currently using to support your ELL students?
  38. 38. CELEBRATING SUCCESS --- CAUGHT IN THE ACT OF SIOP
  39. 39. Reflecting on Learning Rate yourself 1-3, how well did you meet the objectives today? 1. I can teach the concept to someone else because . . . 2. I can demonstrate my learning and want to know more about . . . 3. I’m not sure, I need more . . .

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