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Concrete Experimentation in Scrum at Scrum Australia 2014

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A lot of companies fail when it comes to turning change ideas into small and executable steps with learnings as a desired outcome. Agile day-to-day work, such as dealing with retrospective outcomes, becomes very challenging, and whole Agile transitions fail because of this inability to navigate in complex environments. Following a few simple steps to plan, execute, and learn from experiments will provide tangible outcomes, closing the gap between where you are right now and where you want to be with being Agile. If everyone followed these steps, change would be much faster and less feared.

This session will not only cover the answer to why experimenting is the only way to drive successful change, but will also provide actionable insights, like the 10 necessary features of good experiments and a straightforward framework for making the most out of experiments.

Further details: http://lanyrd.com/2014/auscrum/sdfkpy

Published in: Business

Concrete Experimentation in Scrum at Scrum Australia 2014

  1. 1. Concrete Experimentation in Scrum Scrum Australia 21/10/2014 Bernd Schiffer
  2. 2. Moving to Australia
  3. 3. Move to Australia Is it nice? Yes Get pregnant Our foPrl aOnz No Move back
  4. 4. 20% Chance of getting pregnant per ovulation cycle if absolutely everything’s okay.
  5. 5. Getting pregnant is COMPLEX (not complicated) complicated complex
  6. 6. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complexity “Complexity is generally used to characterise something with many parts where those parts interact with each other in multiple ways. […] …even among scientists, there is no unique definition of complexity…”
  7. 7. staying aware of danger signals, and avoiding inappropriate reactions, managers can lead effectively in a variety of situations. EXPERIMENTS THE CONTEXT’S RESPONSE TO CHARACTERISTICS THE LEADER’S JOB DANGER SIGNALS DANGER SIGNALS A Leader’s Framework for Decision Making by David J. Snowden and Mary E. Boone in Harvard Business Review (11.2007) SIMPLE Repeating patterns and consistent events Clear cause-and-effect relationships evident to every-one; right answer exists Known knowns Fact-based management Sense, categorize, respond Ensure that proper processes are in place Delegate Use best practices Communicate in clear, direct ways Understand that extensive interactive communication may not be necessary Complacency and comfort Desire to make complex problems simple Entrained thinking No challenge of received wisdom Overreliance on best practice if context shifts Create communication channels to challenge orthodoxy Stay connected without micromanaging Don’t assume things are simple Recognize both the value and the limitations of best practice COMPLICATED Expert diagnosis required Cause-and-effect relationships discoverable but not immediately apparent to everyone; more than one right answer possible Known unknowns Fact-based management Sense, analyze, respond Create panels of experts Listen to conflicting advice Experts overconfident in their own solutions or in the efficacy of past solutions Analysis paralysis Expert panels Viewpoints of nonexperts excluded Encourage external and internal stakeholders to challenge expert opinions to combat entrained thinking Use experiments and games to force people to think outside the familiar COMPLEX Flux and unpredictability No right answers; emergent instructive patterns Unknown unknowns Many competing ideas A need for creative and innova-tive approaches Pattern-based leadership Probe, sense, respond Create environments and experiments that allow patterns to emerge Increase levels of interaction and communication Use methods that can help gener-ate ideas: Open up discussion (as through large group methods); set barriers; stimulate attractors; encourage dissent and diversity; and manage starting conditions and monitor for emergence Temptation to fall back into habitual, command-and-control mode Temptation to look for facts rather than allowing patterns to emerge Desire for accelerated resolution of problems or exploitation of opportunities Be patient and allow time for reflection Use approaches that encourage interaction so patterns can emerge CHAOTIC High turbulence No clear cause-and-effect rela-tionships, so no point in looking for right answers Unknowables Many decisions to make and no time to think High tension Pattern-based leadership Act, sense, respond Look for what works instead of seeking right answers Take immediate action to reestablish order (command and control) Provide clear, direct communication Applying a command-and-control approach longer than needed “Cult of the leader” Missed opportunity for innovation Chaos unabated Set up mechanisms (such as parallel teams) to take advantage of opportunities afforded by a chaotic environment Encourage advisers to challenge your point of view once the crisis has abated Work to shift the context from chaotic to complex COMPLICATED Expert diagnosis required Cause-and-effect relationships discoverable but not immediately apparent to everyone; more than one right answer possible Known unknowns Fact-based management Sense, analyze, respond Create panels of experts Listen to conflicting advice Experts overconfident in their own solutions or in the efficacy past solutions Analysis paralysis Expert panels Viewpoints of nonexperts excluded COMPLEX Flux and unpredictability No right answers; emergent instructive patterns Unknown unknowns Many competing ideas A need for creative and innova-tive approaches Pattern-based leadership Probe, sense, respond Create environments and experiments that allow patterns to emerge Increase levels of interaction and communication Use methods that can help gener-ate ideas: Open up discussion (as through large group methods); set barriers; stimulate attractors; encourage dissent and diversity; and manage starting conditions and monitor for emergence Temptation to fall back into habitual, command-and-control mode Temptation to look for facts rather than allowing patterns to emerge Desire for accelerated resolution of problems or exploitation of opportunities High turbulence No clear cause-and-effect rela-tionships, so no point in looking Act, sense, respond Look for what works instead of seeking right answers Applying a command-and-control approach longer than needed “Cult of the leader”
  8. 8. So, experimenting…
  9. 9. Not our own chart!
  10. 10. Preferences over Plans
  11. 11. CAT SHOE, SIC! clear goal arranged trackable through metrics small has due date out in the open evalutated through hypothesis safe-to-fail impelled by champions communicated before start Thus!
  12. 12. Another example Fix It or Trash It
  13. 13. Clear Goal Stop piling up bugs.
  14. 14. Arranged cf. ”How We Deal With Software Defects in Production" by Oliver Lorenz (10.09.2013, http://www.technology-ebay.de/the-teams/mobile-de/blog/how-we-deal-with-software-defects-in-production.html )
  15. 15. Trackable Through Metrics 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 #bugs 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 bugs raised bugs fixed and trashed -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 6 week Experiment starts here
  16. 16. Small “Only” 6 weeks. Only one team. small
  17. 17. Has a Due Date After 6 weeks, incl. presentation of final results after standup scheduled in advance.
  18. 18. Out in the Todo Arrange Open Experi-menting Ready for Reflection Done 3 Smaller Teams Hire internal Coach First Open Space Fix It or Trash It Happi-ness Index cf. “7 Steps to Build a Kanban Board for a Scrum Team’s Impediments” by Bernd Schiffer (05/09/2011, http://agiletrail.com/2011/09/05/7-steps-to-build-a-kanban-board-for-a-scrum-teams-impediments ) Yes, that’s a Kanban board.
  19. 19. Evaluated through Hypothesis h = We can handle more or equal amount of bugs than currently coming in. h0 = The amount of bugs keeps increasing.
  20. 20. Safe-to-Fail Source: http://thinkvitamin.com/design/backstage-star-wars-photos/
  21. 21. Impelled by Champions
  22. 22. Communicated before Start
  23. 23. CAT SHOE, SIC! clear goal arranged trackable through metrics small has due date out in the open evalutated through hypothesis safe-to-fail impelled by champions communicated before start Thus!
  24. 24. Tip 1: Do Retrospectives Treat every action as an experiment.
  25. 25. Tip 2: Uncover What’s Really Going on
  26. 26. http://thechive.com/2014/04/23/this-will-get-your-ocd-boiling-27-photos/funny-ocd-17/ http://www.jokideo.com/ocd-overdrive/ Tip 3: Don’t Be Perfect http://www.clickypix.com/funny-ocd-pictures-drive-crazy/funny-ocd-pictures-26/ http://www.funnyjunk.com/funny_pictures/4044631/Ocd+20/
  27. 27. Our Experi- Omuetcnotm’s e
  28. 28. Result of Our Experiment’s Outcome
  29. 29. Concrete Experimen-tation in Scrum Scrum Australia 21/10/2014 Bernd Schiffer ‣@berndschiffer ‣@bold_mover ‣ coaching@berndschiffer.com ‣ http://slideshare.net/berndschiffer ‣ http://berndschiffer.com ‣ http://boldmover.com ‣ http://agiletrail.com Thank you!

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