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Goal Setting & Identifying Problem.pptx

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Goal Setting & Identifying Problem.pptx

  1. 1. Setting & Identifying Problem/sGoal Counseling Techniques pcbestrella
  2. 2. Conceptualizing Problems and Setting Goals • There are some of the larger issues of counseling which we need to appropriately consider. These are: – Nature of the client problems – Establishment of goals that are realistic antecedents to the solutions of the those problems.
  3. 3. Conceptualizing problem and establishment of counseling goals…. • There are philosophical questions that underlie even these issues, since there is no one way of conceptualizing human problems. • What brings clients to counseling? – 1. Clients enter counseling when they experience needs that they alone are unable to understand or to meet. – 2. The experience of “needing” is a natural part of the process of living and is the means which we facilitate and enhance that process.
  4. 4. Jourard /Maslow • All human beings share certain basic needs. • 1. Survival needs –self preservation • 2. Physical needs – nourishment ,freedom from pain,rest, replenishment of energy • 3. Love and sex needs –to become involve to another person • 4. Status, success, and self-esteem-needs that motivate us to gain respect,confidence , & admiration
  5. 5. Basic needs…. • 5. Physical and mental-health needs. To become a functional human beings • 6. Freedom needs –To feel autonomous, free to make own choices or free not choose • 7. Challenge needs – the need for an activity, future orientation,opportunity (not feel bored) • 8. Cognitive-clarity needs. Our drive to resolve the conflicts in values, ideas, and commitment that exist in our world.
  6. 6. Role of counselor when these needs are unmet • Create a favorable climate for counseling, even beyond being a good and caring listener; • To hear the unmet needs as clients describe their problems; • To help them hear those needs as well • To help clients translate these needs into wants in clear and that the working mode can be translated from a passive to an active one.
  7. 7. • Listen for those solutions that client has tried that have become part of the problem and help the client see this. • Help clients formulate goals that will help meet the needs. • Help client recognize that they are making progress.
  8. 8. Responses of the clients in attempting to solve the problems • 1. Attitudes the client may already have that contribute to the problem, impede the solution , or become the problem; • 2. Feelings, the emotional responses to the problem that often exaggerate the problem, impede the comprehension of the problem or become the problem; • 3. Behavior, the habits and routines that are unthought or inappropriate responses, and perhaps contributors to the problem;
  9. 9. • 4. Interaction Patterns. These established ways of reacting to familiar others including miscommunication channels, expectations, self fulfilling prophesies, etc.
  10. 10. Two types of Goals • 1. Process goals. (General goals) These are related to the establisment of therapeutic conditions necessary for client change. e.g. establishing rapport • 2. Outcome goals. These are goals directed to your client's changes to be made as a result of counseling. (Visible & Observable) • Clients need to understand their concern and how counseling can be used to respond to their concerns.
  11. 11. Exercise on Goal Setting (3 goals) • Gary is in Grade 11. He is bright and personable, but a little bit shy. He came to counseling with the problem of relating to girls. Specifically, he belives hat there is some flaw in his personality that “turns girls off”. His reason for thinking this grow out of his experience with dating. He reports that girls go out with him once or twice and then don't acccept anymore dates. He admits getting discouraged when he calls a girl for a date and she says she already has a commitment. If this happens tweice, he never calls the girl again, assuming that she doesn't want to date him.
  12. 12. Three elements of Good Outcome Goals • 1st element includes the behavior to be changed; • 2nd, the conditions under which the changed behavior will occur; • 3rd, the level or amount of change.
  13. 13. 2nd Exercise • Determine which of the elements of an outcome goal- behavior, condition or level may be missing. • 1. To decrease temper tantrums. • 2. To increase exercise to two times a week over a six week period. • 3. To decrease the number of nightly arguments at home with your father. • 4. To decrease tardiness. • 5. To reduce aggressive behavior with siblings by 50%. • 6. To make 3 positive comments about the strengths of each member of your family during
  14. 14. Answers: • 1. The missing elements are the (C) and (L) of the goal. • 2. This goal specifies the behavior and the level; the condition (C) is missing. • 3. The level (L)of the goal is missing here. • 4. This goal specifies the behavior (b); the condition (c) and level (L) are not present. • 5. The behavior (B) is missing here; aggressive behavior” is a lable and does not specify what the person would reduce. • 6. this is a complete outcome goal ! ” Making positive comments” is the behavior; “three of them in one week” is the level; “ to each family member” is the condition.
  15. 15. Questions: • Are your goals specific or vague? • How would you and Garry know when you had achieved these goals? • Are your goals process or outcome goals? • If they are process goals, would you need to involve Tom in their establishment? • If they are outcome goals, how would achieving them affect Tom's dating problem?
  16. 16. How outcome goals are established? • 1. They begin as overall goals that are directly related to the client's specific or general concerns or descrition of a set of problems; and • 2. Specific and observable sub-goals are established whichd if achieved, permit the realization of the overall goals.
  17. 17. Exercise 3 • Based from the e.g. case, write your general goal and 4 specific goals • General Goal___________________________________ ______________________________________ _________________________ • Specific goals • 1 • 2 • 3 • 4
  18. 18. Client participation in goal setting • Goal setting is highly personal. Therefore, the client must select goals that are important enough to make sacrifices to achieve. • Both counselor and client could work together to determine specific goals and subgoals, that when achieved might alleviate the client's concerns.

Editor's Notes

  • Client should be helped to develop more fully his or her self-actualizing potential and to increase the frequency of positive self-statments by e.g. 50%
  • Ientify a few goals which you think might be appropriate in working with Garry , given that you know very little about him.
  • Thus, goal-setting moves from general to specific goals; the specific goals are directly related to the general goal, and the general goal is a reflection of the problems presented to the counselor.
  • As with aspect of the counseling relationship, goal-setting should be an interactdive process, both assume responsibility.

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