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Citizen kane 2012 from i mac

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Citizen kane 2012 from i mac

  1. 1. Citizen Kane Orson Welles 1941
  2. 2. What are the first images we see?
  3. 3. What do the opening film images tell us?
  4. 4. Caged
  5. 5. Gilded
  6. 6. Gilded• What does Kane collect?
  7. 7. Gilded• What does Kane collect? • statues
  8. 8. Gilded• What does Kane collect? • statues • animals
  9. 9. Gilded• What does Kane collect? • statues • animals • people
  10. 10. Gilded
  11. 11. Gilded
  12. 12. Gilded
  13. 13. Gilded
  14. 14. Gilded
  15. 15. Gilded
  16. 16. Gilded
  17. 17. Gilded
  18. 18. Mise-en-scène, character, themes
  19. 19. Mise-en-scène, character, themes• After opening sequence, how are we introduced to Kane’s life?
  20. 20. Mise-en-scène, character, themes• After opening sequence, how are we introduced to Kane’s life? • Newsreel
  21. 21. Mise-en-scène, character, themes• After opening sequence, how are we introduced to Kane’s life? • Newsreel • Images, words, people’s recollections, memories, reflections (distorted mirrors?)
  22. 22. Words-ImagesThe Impossible TruthMemory is Inaccurate
  23. 23. • Words cannot fully describe what we remember; memory fails. Words are imprecise in what they describe.• Interpretation: people use different words to recall experience; always different and made complicated by one’s own relation to the historical moment• Newspapers (spin, bias, and gossip, a particular POV)• The Newsreel (movies!) that tells “the life” of Kane…does it?
  24. 24. mise-en-abyme
  25. 25. Why does Kane (re)collect?What is he hoping to retrieve?
  26. 26. Why does Kane (re)collect?What is he hoping to retrieve?• A mother’s love
  27. 27. If he seeks his mother’s lost love, what does he seek from his father-figures?
  28. 28. If he seeks his mother’s lost love, what does he seek from his father-figures?• Death• Despises Thatcher (surrogate father)
  29. 29. In his own words . . .
  30. 30. In his own words . . .• Kane’s words fail him• Declaration of Principles—failure, or at least, inaccurate• Dying word—Rosebud (Do we ever really know what Rosebud meant to Kane? We know it is a sled, but…)• (Rumor: William Randolph Hearst nickname for his girlfriend’s, Marion Davies, genitalia)• Other people’s words—Thatcher’s written diary begins the story of Kane
  31. 31. Who do we Trust?
  32. 32. Who do we Trust?Kane? Bernstein? Leland? Susan? Thatcher?The Press?
  33. 33. Who do we Trust?
  34. 34. Who do we Trust?• What is trust? What does it mean “to trust”?• Trust: • Trust: to feel safe, loved, protected • Financial arrangement established for children at early age—but at what cost? ‘Trust-fund’ babies.• Trust: Business arrangement, monopoly; all control in the hands of a single power
  35. 35. Who do we Trust?But aren’t all relationships—family, marriage, business, friendship—financial relationships?
  36. 36. Cinematic Relationships• The Triangular Pattern• Oedipal Complex• Son loves mother (doesn’t know it is his mother)• Son kills father to have mother• Discovers his lover is his mother (taboo)• Blinds himself when he realizes the truth
  37. 37. Cinematic Relationships Theory: To avoid incest taboo, boy displaces desire onto other objects and/or people. In truth, son blinds himself to his mother’s love by transferring love elsewhere
  38. 38. Cinematic RelationshipsTriangular Patterns echo Kane’s Oedipal Complex His Search
  39. 39. Cinematic RelationshipsTriangular Patterns echo Kane’s Oedipal Complex His Search
  40. 40. Cinematic RelationshipsTriangular Patterns echo Kane’s Oedipal Complex His Search
  41. 41. Cinematic RelationshipsTriangular Patterns echo Kane’s Oedipal Complex His Search
  42. 42. Cinematic RelationshipsTriangular Patterns echo Kane’s Oedipal Complex His Search
  43. 43. Cinematic RelationshipsTriangular Patterns echo Kane’s Oedipal Complex His Search
  44. 44. Cinematic RelationshipsTriangular Patterns echo Kane’s Oedipal Complex His Search
  45. 45. Cinematic RelationshipsTriangular Patterns echo Kane’s Oedipal Complex His Search
  46. 46. Cinematic RelationshipsTriangular Patterns echo Kane’s Oedipal Complex His Search
  47. 47. Cinematic RelationshipsTriangular Patterns echo Kane’s Oedipal Complex His Search
  48. 48. Cinematic Love Triangles
  49. 49. Cinematic Love Triangles
  50. 50. Cinematic Love Triangles ? Ho ge ma a ge? omH ? age omH
  51. 51. Cinematic Love Triangles ? Ho ge ma a ge? omH ? age omH
  52. 52. Mise-en-scène and character Susan• Analyzing character through theme of collecting and caging
  53. 53. Mise-en-scène and character Susan
  54. 54. Mise-en-scène and character Susan
  55. 55. Mise-en-scène and character Susan
  56. 56. Mise-en-scène and character Susan
  57. 57. Mise-en-scène and character Susan
  58. 58. Mise-en-scène and character Susan
  59. 59. Mise-en-scène and character Susan
  60. 60. Mise-en-scène and character Susan
  61. 61. Mise-en-scène and character Susan
  62. 62. Bird CageSusan: Mise-en-scène Notes
  63. 63. Bird Cage Susan: Mise-en-scène Notes• The British sometimes refer to a woman as a “bird”• Susan is the “songbird” and “love-bird” caught in a Lover’s Nest (headlines)• Kane creates little shadow-bird images (the rooster) on the wall for her— fore-“shadowing” things to come• Her bedroom wallpaper has little animals on it• When she tries to commit suicide we see a close-up of Susan’s face on the pillow, lighting creates shadows as if prison/cage bars across her face.• Remember: lighting is mise-en-scène• The Cockatoo during the Butler’s recounting: birds’s screech sounds like her singing and talking• When Gettys blackmails Kane for his affair with Susan, he tells him he will send him to Sing-Sing

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