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UKSCA Case Study

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UKSCA Case Study

  1. 1. UKSCA Accreditation Case Study Ben Spong Portsmouth FC
  2. 2. Content  Sport and Subject  Needs Analysis –Sport and Subject  Subject Assessment and Goals  3 Month Integrated Coaching Program  Review and Reassessment  Future Recommendations  References
  3. 3. Sport and Subject  Age: 16 (at start of intervention)  Playing age: 8  Training age: 1  Sport: Football (soccer)  Position: Centre Defender  Level: 1st year scholar in Portsmouth FC Youth Team
  4. 4. Needs Analysis - Sport  Low intensity for 70% of match play with 150-250 brief intense actions, including changes of direction and repeated sprint efforts (Bangsbo, Mohr & Krustrup, 2006)  Central Defenders spend the majority (34%) of game time between Aerobic and Anaerobic Threshold, in HR Zone 3 (Bujnovsky et al., 2015)  TD = 10,336m ± 471m, with 186m ± 82m of Sprint TD (1.78%) (Andrzejewski et al., 2015)  Multi directional movements: lateral, forward, backwards, turning, jumping, kicking, sprinting (Bangsbo, Mohr & Krustrup, 2006)  Potential to play 60+ games, with 3-4 hours training 4 days per week. Change in volume from schoolboy to apprentice level playing.
  5. 5. Needs Analysis – Sport Injury Risk  Lower extremity non-contact ligament injuries at ankle and knee most prevalent in soccer with ATFL and MCL most commonly reported  Youth players injury risk increased during PHV  Previous injury highlighted as significant risk factor across all ages of football (soccer) (Read et al., 2016)  Proprioception and Eccentric Hamstring exercises suggested as a positive intervention for reducing injury risk (Junge & Dvorak, 2004)
  6. 6. Needs / Characteristics Position Height (cm) Weight (kg) Body Fat (%) Central Defence 175 66 12 CMJ 20m Sprint AR AL 24.4 3.03 8.17 8.22 (Gioldasis et al., 2014 ; Nike Average SPARQ Data Season 14/15) Player Height (cm) Weight (kg) Body Fat (%) Player A 186 78.4 6.7 CMJ 20m AR AL YoYo 1RM BP 1Rm Sqt 23.45 3.3 8.7 8.4 31 95 110
  7. 7. Screening  Modified Functional Movement Screen (Cook, 2014) Dysfunction Daily Intervention Poor BL Stability SL Stability Exercises (BL) Poor Ecc Control of LL Propriception exercises, Pistol Squat, Depth Jumps, SL Landing Tight Hamstrings Foam Rolling, Dynamic Stretching Routine *No significant injury history recorded.
  8. 8. Goals and Outcomes Coach Goals S+C Coach • Improve RFD • Improve Eccentric Control • Improve Proprioception on SL • Increase Arrowhead Speed Physio • Remain Injury Free • Increase SL Stability Technical Coach • Increase in game Speed • Increase in game Strength • In Game body position
  9. 9. Program Outline  3 month, 12 week block (2 x 6 week mesocycles). Feb – April ’16 Weeks 1-6 7-12 Strength • RFD • Tech Education • RFD • Tech Education Power • On Pitch Plyo x2 p/w • Power Based Gym Work • On Pitch Plyo x2 p/w Speed • SAQ Drills in Warm up x5 p/w • Running Mechs within • Plyometrics in Warm Up x5 p/w • Horizontal force production to increase forward mechanics Agility • On Pitch x2 p/w On pitch x2 p/w Endurance • Daily Red Zone targets • Daily Red Zone Targets
  10. 10. Macrocycle – 1 season
  11. 11. Macrocyle Overview  Season long program, with 6 week mesocycles. Encompassing Pre Competiton, Competiton, Transition and Recovery phases (Bompa, 1999)  Wave loaded Volume and Intensity (Rosenblatt, 2014)  Performance peaking December and March, based on fixture schedule and scholarship structure.
  12. 12. Mesocycle Conditioning Programme
  13. 13. Mesocycle Outputs Week 1-6 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 WEEKLY TARGET Actual Scores Week 7-12 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 WEEKLY TARGET Actual Scores
  14. 14. Mesocycle Strength Programme
  15. 15. Strength Outcomes
  16. 16. Mesocycle Overview  Wave loaded weeks, with deload every 5th week to allow for supercompensation and general adaptation (Rosenblatt, 2014; Bompa, 1999)  Monitored using a Training Impulse (RPE Session Duration = SRPE) (Gabbett, 2016)  Chronic workload gained from SRPE, and maintained throughout season  HR used to monitor time spent in Red Zones, although unreliable and not used for program design at this stage
  17. 17. Microcycle Plan Mon Tues Weds Thurs Fri Sat Sun Warm Up • Light Jog • Dynamic Mobility • Straight Line Sprint • Plyometic • Power Work, Jumps, Bounds REST • Agility • COD • Light • Dynamic Mobility • Straight Line Sprint GAME REST Tech • Light Session, Phase of Play • Hard Session • SSGs • Phase of Play • Running Block REST • Hard Session • SSG • Light Session • Set Piece • Game Prep GAME REST Gym • UL Strength • LL Strength REST • WB Power • UL Strength OFF GAME REST Other • Prehab • Hydration Test • Prehab • Hydration Test • Prehab • Hydration Test • Prehab • Hydration Test • Prehab • Hydration Test Prehab REST
  18. 18. Microcycle Outcomes 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
  19. 19. Microcyle Overview  Wave loaded, with peak on Saturday game day  2 Rest Days (Weds, Sun)  2 day recovery method (Sun, Mon (Active))  SRPE measured, acute workload matching chronic workload 1:1 – 1.5 (Gabbett, 2016)
  20. 20. Pre & Post Training Player Height (cm) Weight (kg) Body Fat (%) Player A 186 78.4 6.7 CMJ 20m AR AL YoYo 1RM BP 1Rm Sqt 23.45 3.3 8.7 8.4 31 95 110 Player Height (cm) Weight (kg) Body Fat (%) Player A 186 80.2 6.3 CMJ 20m AR AL YoYo 1RM BP 1Rm Sqt 24.60 3.14 8.3 8.5 24 97.5 115
  21. 21. Recommendations  More focus on in-session conditioning drills to maintain high endurance capacities  Purchase of GPS monitors to assist in load monitoring  HR Monitors used more frequently to ensure physical loading is closely monitored  Development of Agility based movements to supplement those completed on-field, and reduce Arrowhead time in testing  Begin to ‘feel’ successful lifting in the gym.
  22. 22. References Andrzejewski, M., Chmura, J., Pluta, B., & Konarski, J. M. (2015). Sprinting Activities And Distance Covered By Top Level Europa League Soccer Players. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching, 10(1), 39–50. Bangsbo, J., Mohr, M., & Krustrup, P. (2006). Physical And Metabolic Demands Of Training And Match-play In The Elite Football Player. Journal Of Sports Sciences, 24(7), 665–674. Http://Doi.Org/10.1080/02640410500482529 Bompa, T. (1999). Periodization: Theory And Methodology Of Training (4th Ed.). Leeds: Human Kinetics. Bujnovsky, D., Maly, T., Zahalka, F., & Mala, L. (2015). Analysis Of Physical Load Among Professional Soccer Players During Matches With Respect To Field Position. Journal Of Physical Education & Sport, 15(3), 569–575. Cook, G., Burton, L., Hoogenboom, B. J., & Voight, M. (2014). Functional Movement Screening: The Use Of Fundamental Movements As An Assessment Of Function - Part 1. International Journal Of Sports Physical Therapy, 9(3), 396–409. Gabbett, T. J. (2016). The Training-injury Prevention Paradox: Should Athletes Be Training Smarter And Harder? British Journal Of Sports Medicine. Http://Doi.Org/10.1136/Bjsports-2015-095788 Gioldasis Aristotelis, Bekris Evangelos, & Gissis Ioannis. (2014). Playing Position: Anthropometric And Fitness Demands In Youth Soccer. Sport Science Review, 23(3-4), 151. Http://Doi.Org/10.2478/Ssr-2014-0009 Junge, A., & Dvorak, J. (2004). Soccer Injuries. Sports Medicine, 34(13), 929–938. Http://Doi.Org/10.2165/00007256-200434130-00004 Read, P. J., Oliver, J. L., De Ste Croix, M. B. A., Myer, G. D., & Lloyd, R. S. (2016). Assessment Of Injury Risk Factors In Male Youth Soccer Players. Strength & Conditioning Journal (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins), 38(1), 12–21. Rosenblatt, B., Joyce, D., & Lewingdon, D. (2014). Planning A Performance Program. In High Performance Training For Sports (Vol. 1, Pp. 247–259). Leeds: Human Kinetics. Verkhoshansky, Y., & Siff, M. (2009). Supertraining (6th Ed., Vol. 1). Rome: Verkhoshansky SSTM.

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