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Reduce Waste and GHG

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Reduce Waste and GHG

  1. 1. 3. Reduce waste and support recovery and recycling<br />
  2. 2. 2<br />3. Reduce waste and support recovery and recycling<br />Water use intensity at FPAC member pulp and paper mills dropped almost 6% between 2005 and 2007, for a total reduction of nearly 20% since 1999.  <br />
  3. 3. Recycling Leadership and Momentum<br />3<br />64.6%<br />In 2003, members committed to increase recovery rate to 55% by 2012<br />Source: PPPC<br />
  4. 4. 4<br />3. Reduce waste and support recovery and recycling<br />Air emissions: Between 1999 and 2007, releases of total particulate matter per tonne of output decreased by 65% .<br />Source: FPAC Member Survey<br />
  5. 5. 5<br />3. Reduce waste and support recovery and recycling<br />Air emissions: Between 1999 and 2007, the amount of total reduced sulphur (TRS) released per tonne of output decreased by 60%.<br />Source: FPAC Member Survey<br />
  6. 6. 4. Reduce greenhouse gases and help fight climate change<br />
  7. 7. 7<br />Deforestation worldwide results in up to 17,4% of global human-caused GHG emissions (IPCC).<br />In comparison, deforestation caused less than 3% of the total GHG emissions in Canada (NRCan 2008a).<br />
  8. 8. 8<br />4. Reduce greenhouse gases <br />and help fight climate change<br />“Reduced deforestation and degradation is the forest mitigation option with the largest and most immediate carbon stock impact in the short term per ha and per year globally.”<br /> <br />“In the long term, sustainable forest management strategy, aimed at maintaining or increasing carbon stocks, while producing an annual sustained yield of timber, will generate the largest mitigation benefit”. <br />- Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change<br />IPCC, Working Group III, chapter 9, page 549-50.<br />
  9. 9. 4. Reduce greenhouse gases <br />and help fight climate change<br /> “ Promoting forest restoration and sustainable forest management has more promise for mitigating climate change than narrowly focusing on reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD).”<br /> “Overcoming deforestation using policy and economic tools is much less feasible than promoting carbon uptake by overcoming forest degradation and restoring forest and agricultural landscapes.”<br />R. Michael Martin, Director of the Forest Economics and Policy Division, Forestry Department, FAO<br />Unasylva 230, Vol. 59, 2008<br />
  10. 10. 10<br />Virtually no deforestation<br />Canada’s rate of deforestation is less than 0.02% <br />and is not due to logging.<br />Source: NRCan 2008a, Global Forest Watch<br />
  11. 11. 4. Reduce greenhouse gases <br />and help fight climate change<br />Forest as a % of Original Forests (1996) <br />(2009)<br />±90%<br />Baseline – 8000 Years ago<br />World Resource Institute. 2007a. Forest Extent: Forest area (current) as a percent of original forest area; World 1996.<br />
  12. 12. 12<br />Pulp & Paper Mills Performance<br />-57%<br />- 6%<br />+34%<br />Source: FPAC Energy Survey 1990-2007; Environment Canada. National Inventory Report: Greenhouse Gas Sources and Sinks in Canada, 1990-2007.<br />
  13. 13. Forest Sector GHG Emissions<br />Source: CCFM 2006d<br />
  14. 14. Forest Sector GHG Emissions<br />Forestry and Logging (NAICS 113); <br />Support Activities for Forestry (NAICS 1153); <br />Paper Manufacturing (NAICS 322), which includes pulp, paper, and paperboard mills; and <br />Wood Products Manufacturing (NAICS 321). <br />GHG emissions in 2002 were unchanged from 1980.<br />23% increase in energy use but significant improvements in energy efficiency producing more output per unit of energy used.<br />Greater reliance on cleaner fuels helped to limit growth in both energy use and emissions. <br />Production of pulp and paper increased by over 30%.<br />Source: CCFM 2006d<br />
  15. 15. Forest Sector GHG Emissions and Energy use<br />GHG emissions in 2002 were unchanged from 1980.<br />23% increase in energy use<br />Source: CCFM 2006d<br />
  16. 16. Forest Sector Energy Sources<br />Greater reliance on cleaner fuels<br />Source: CCFM 2006d<br />
  17. 17. 17<br />4. Reduce greenhouse gases <br />and help fight climate change<br />For pulp and paper manufacture, FPAC members reduced their greenhouse gas emissions intensity by 7% between 2005 and 2007 for a long-term reduction of 61% between 1990 and 2007. <br />Source: FPAC Energy Monitoring Report 1990-2007<br />
  18. 18. 18<br />4. Reduce greenhouse gases <br />and help fight climate change<br />Percentage of Energy from Biomass - FPAC Members<br />(Pulp & Paper Facilities)<br />Source: Sustainability Report 2009 (under press)<br />
  19. 19. 19<br />4. Reduce greenhouse gases <br />and help fight climate change<br />Pulp and paper mills improve their energy intensity by 5% between 2005 and 2007 for a long-term reduction of 22% between 1990 and 2007.<br /> <br />Energy Intensity FPAC Members<br />(pulp and paper facilities)<br />Source: FPAC Energy Monitoring Report 1990-2007<br />

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