Starting a School Walking Program <br />
Why should schools start a walking program?<br />For the first time in more than 100 years, our children’s life expectancy...
Ideas for Walking Programs<br />Encourage parents and children to walk to school <br />Schedule a small amount of time dur...
Indoor lessons on measuring items
Create writing lessons using  walking areas
Create lesson plans that involve a pedometer</li></ul>Walking Clubs or Fitness Challenges<br /><ul><li>Create a calendar w...
Introduce Pedometers in the Classroom<br />An electronic instrument that measures the up & down motion of the hip in a ver...
Ready to Walk<br />Start out at a slow, easy pace for each walking session <br />The walking step is a rolling motion. Str...
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Tips on Starting a School Walking Program

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Walking is the easiest form of physical activity. This presentation guides teachers, principals and administrators on starting a walking program for elementary school students.

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Tips on Starting a School Walking Program

  1. 1. Starting a School Walking Program <br />
  2. 2. Why should schools start a walking program?<br />For the first time in more than 100 years, our children’s life expectancy is declining due to the increase in weight<br />Children in North Carolina are 4 times more likely to be overweight than youth nationally<br />Young people exhibit risk factors for heart disease as early as third grade<br />Nine million American children ages 6-19 are overweight<br />A 5% increase in physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption can produce a cost saving benefit of $1.54 billion per year<br />
  3. 3. Ideas for Walking Programs<br />Encourage parents and children to walk to school <br />Schedule a small amount of time during the day where the children can walk ;<br /><ul><li>The DEW program (Drop everything and walk)</li></ul>Create lesson plans that involve walking<br /><ul><li>Outdoor scavenger hunt for different items from science class
  4. 4. Indoor lessons on measuring items
  5. 5. Create writing lessons using walking areas
  6. 6. Create lesson plans that involve a pedometer</li></ul>Walking Clubs or Fitness Challenges<br /><ul><li>Create a calendar where you can track how many days each child walks</li></ul>County-Wide Goals – Walk-A-Thon, 5K Community Walk/Run<br />
  7. 7. Introduce Pedometers in the Classroom<br />An electronic instrument that measures the up & down motion of the hip in a vertical plane<br />Can not measure intensity or frequency<br />Use in the classroom to monitor physical activity and motivate at-risk youth to increase physical activity<br />Integrate pedometers into your standard course of study<br />Pedometers are useful for teaching students, improving your teaching & walking program<br />
  8. 8. Ready to Walk<br />Start out at a slow, easy pace for each walking session <br />The walking step is a rolling motion. Strike the ground first with your heel<br />Roll through the step from heel to toe <br />Push off with your toe<br />Allow your muscles to warm up before you stretch, add speed or hills<br />Warm up for 5 minutes at this easy pace <br />Do stretches to increase flexibility during walking:<br /><ul><li>Repeat exercises 5-10 times or hold given stretches for 15-30 seconds
  9. 9. Move in slow and controlled motions
  10. 10. Stretch to the point of tension, not pain
  11. 11. Be sure to stretch both sides of your body</li></li></ul><li>Classroom Management<br />Establish Guidelines:<br />“You shake it, we take it”<br />Number/Label pedometers<br />Discovery Time – wearing the pedometer, reset, how it works, etc.<br />Emphasize confidentiality, honesty, respect and care for the pedometers<br />
  12. 12. Incentives <br />Toe Tokens <br />Kids love to collect them and wear them on shoelaces, bracelets, necklaces, and backpacks<br />Mile Markers<br />Use these markers to reward students when they have reached 25, 50, 75 and 100 miles of walking<br />
  13. 13. Be Active North Carolina <br />Website: <br />http://www.beactivenc.org<br />Twitter:<br />http://www.twitter.com/BeActiveNC<br />Facebook:<br />http://www.facebook.com/BeActiveNorthCarolina<br />YouTube:<br />http://www.youtube.com/user/BeActiveNCorg<br />Blog:<br />http://www.parentingforhealth.org/blog<br />

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