Think11 final

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  • If you’re concentrating on one static task, you often fail to notice dynamic movement. That’s why you should not text and drive.
  • If you’re concentrating on one static task, you often fail to notice dynamic movement. That’s why you should not text and drive.
  • If you’re concentrating on one static task, you often fail to notice dynamic movement. That’s why you should not text and drive.
  • If you’re concentrating on one static task, you often fail to notice dynamic movement. That’s why you should not text and drive.
  • If you’re concentrating on one static task, you often fail to notice dynamic movement. That’s why you should not text and drive.
  • If you’re concentrating on one static task, you often fail to notice dynamic movement. That’s why you should not text and drive.
  • If you’re concentrating on one static task, you often fail to notice dynamic movement. That’s why you should not text and drive.
  • n the first few generations of CRM we saw the basic three pillars (sales, marketing, and customer service), a common data model (probably the best innovation CRM provided to organizations), and common integration points to the existing systems in the organization: ERP, legacy, databases — even partner applications in occasions (look ma, no VAN!).  The following picture is a basic representation of what CRM 1.0 looks like.Traditional CRM ImplementationThese implementations collected data across all functions in the front office, store it in a central location and use it.  That data was all operational: who did what when, for how long, and what were the results.  The promise of a “holistic customer representation” or “360 view of the customer” did not materialize since we were missing the most important item in the equation: what the customer wanted when they came to see us, why did they need that, and what was the result of the interaction.  In other words, we had the content but we were missing the context and intent of those interactions.Later we began to add “components” that complimented what we were missing.  Created analytical CRM by adding analytics engines to it.  Began to measure customer satisfaction via surveys and inserted that value into the customer records (not always).  Became proactive by trying to get what we needed to make good decisions: context and intent.  Products were enhanced, better integration added, and more powerful CRM solutions released.
  • Enter the Groundswell revolution and the advent of Social Media into the enterprise.  Organizations start to listen to customers.  They acknowledge there is a lot of data about their business but don’t know how to find it or tap into it.  We feel empowered by what we are discovering — but we still don’t have a framework to take advantage of this!  The tools give some guidelines and insights as to how to proceed, but nothing really in the sense of strategy or what to do with it.We are entering CRM 4.0 (amazing how Paul Greenberg’s book is also coming on version 4.0 — coincidence? I think not) and we need some guidance.
  • It’s an extension of CRM When a company feels human, people will regard it as a trusted peer.It affects thoroughly operations, its value chain and organizational structure
  • Door Experiment
  • Think11 final

    1. 1.
    2. 2.
    3. 3. InattentionalBlindness<br />
    4. 4.
    5. 5.
    6. 6.
    7. 7.
    8. 8.
    9. 9.
    10. 10.
    11. 11.
    12. 12.
    13. 13.
    14. 14.
    15. 15.
    16. 16.
    17. 17.
    18. 18.
    19. 19.
    20. 20.
    21. 21. “We are not seats or eyeballs or end users or consumers. We are human beings – and our reach exceeds your grasp.<br />Deal with it.”<br />
    22. 22.
    23. 23.
    24. 24.
    25. 25.
    26. 26.
    27. 27.
    28. 28.
    29. 29.
    30. 30. 50<br />
    31. 31. 12<br />
    32. 32. 0<br />
    33. 33.
    34. 34.
    35. 35.
    36. 36. Social CRM<br />
    37. 37.
    38. 38. Nobody cares about your products, people care about their problems.<br />
    39. 39.
    40. 40. Customers do not want a relationship with your Credit Union, they want the benefits a relationship can offer to them.<br />
    41. 41. Social CRM<br />Social CRM is part of a social business that helps companies make sense of (and then act on) data they collect from social customer interactions. <br />– Jacob Morgan<br />
    42. 42. Or…<br />Social CRM is a philosophy & a business strategy, supported by a technology platform, business rules, workflow, processes & social characteristics, designed to engage the customer in a collaborative conversation in order to provide mutually beneficial value in a trusted & transparent business environment. It’s the company’s response to the customer’s ownership of the conversation. <br />– Paul Greenberg<br />
    43. 43.
    44. 44.
    45. 45.
    46. 46.
    47. 47.
    48. 48.
    49. 49.
    50. 50. Remember…<br /><ul><li> Social CRM does not replace traditional CRM
    51. 51. Social CRM humanizes your Credit Union
    52. 52. Social CRM puts the customer in the core of the Credit Union’s strategy
    53. 53. Social CRM needs a new organizational mindset</li></li></ul><li>Ask yourself…<br /><ul><li> How can we grow sales thanks to our network’s network on LinkedIn?
    54. 54. How do we set up a real strategy to engage relevant prospects?
    55. 55. How can use interactions on Facebook to propose appropriate and on-time messages to our fans?
    56. 56. Can we truly create a value proposition that meets precisely the needs & expectations of our customers? Not our needs only, their needs.
    57. 57. How do we commit to such a vision?</li></li></ul><li>
    58. 58.
    59. 59.
    60. 60.
    61. 61.
    62. 62.
    63. 63.
    64. 64.
    65. 65.
    66. 66.
    67. 67.
    68. 68. The Tenets of VRM<br />The individual is the point of integration<br />The individual is the focus of interactions with vendors<br />The individual controls access to information<br />
    69. 69.
    70. 70.
    71. 71.
    72. 72. Let’s talk<br /><ul><li> @uwehook
    73. 73. uwe@bateshook.com
    74. 74. bateshook.com/think-11</li></li></ul><li>

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