Semantic web assignment1

424 views

Published on

Semantic Web course assignment 1. web

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
424
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Semantic web assignment1

  1. 1. Semantic  Web  –  Assignment  1  Assigment  name:  WebKR  Assignment  1  Full  name:  Barry  Kollee  Student  number:  10349863  Student  username:  UvA  student  (barry.kollee@student.uva.nl)    Web  of  Data  1.  What  does  the  word  Semantic  web  means?  Semantic  web  can  be  described  as  how  computers  are  linked  to  each  other  in  a  conceptual  way.  They  manage  to  talk  to  one  and  another  by  using  a  common  language  which  results  in  an  appropriate  way  of  sending  and  retrieving  data.    All  the  data  from  the  web  (text,  images,  video,  sound  etc.)  is  organized  by  using  keywords  and  paths  (URI’s).  The  ideal  goal  for  a  ‘Semantic  web’  is  to  be  able  to  share  information  easily  with  different  computers  so  that  the  paths  and  indexes  would  become  ‘Machine  readable’.  By  using  this  methodology  we  should  be  able  to  link  all  data,  which  is  available  on  the  web,  to  one  and  another  which  enables  data  sharing  to  all  kinds  of  services.  So  the  goal  of  Semantic  web  is  to  “make  the  web  more  accessible  to  computers”.  2.  Why  is  automatic  reuse  and  data  interoperability  on  the  web  difficult?  The  web  it  not  just  a  Semantic  web.  Applications  on  the  web  need  information  to  work  with.  Because  our  information  systems  are  keeping  their  data  to  themselves  we’re  unable  to  link  them.  Applications  use  different  formats,  structures,  vocabularies  and  have  a  different  way  of  giving  meaning  to  certain  values.    We  already  try  to  let  the  web  share  their  information  easier.  We  do  that  by  using  different  API’s  and/or  give  structure  to  our  work  by  using  common  languages  which  are  defined  as  standards.  But  still  there  remains  a  translation  or  index-­‐bridge  throughout  these  information  systems.  3.  Why  is  DBpedia  a  hub  in  the  Web  of  Data?  DBpedia  gives  us  the  opportunity  to  create  new  links  to  all  this  information  on  the  web.  DBpedia  is  able  to  link  data,  which  gives  us  a  way  to  communicate  and  share  data  with  other  datasets  and  ontologies.  With  this  in  mind  we  could  make  a  reference  from  a  ‘squirrel’  to  a  ‘swimming  pool’.   14.  What  are  the  four  rules  of  linked  data  ?  There  aren’t  actual  rules  for  linking  data  but  it’s  more  that  they  can  be  described  as  behaviors.  However  we  can  state  that  not  keeping  us  to  these  ‘rules’  would  disable  us  to  make  data  interconnected.   1. Use  URL’s  as  names  for  things.  All  data  on  the  web  is  being  placed  on  a  unique  addressee.  The  naming   conventions  of  these  data  files/paths  is  really  important  so  that  you  can  easily  refer  to  it.   2. Use  HTTP  URL’s  so  that  people  can  look  up  those  names.  The  main  goal  for  this  rule  is  that  we  apply   standards  to  our  URL’s  (addresses  of  data)  so  that  they  are  accessible  more  easily.                                                                                                                          1  Berners-­‐Lee.,  (2006),  http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html    
  2. 2. 3. When  someone  looks  up  a  URL,  provide  useful  information,  using  the  standards   4. Include  links  to  other  URL’s,  so  that  they  can  discover  more  things.  This  rule  is  all  about  linking  data  to  the   web.  5.  Pick  and  investigate  four  other  datasets  from  http://linkeddata.org.  Briefly,  describe  what  kind  of  data  the  dataset  describes.  LinkedMDB  This  dataset  it’s  goal  is  to  build  a  Semantic  web  for  video’s.  It  includes  a  large  number  of  interlinks  to  several  datasets  on  the  open  data  could  and  references  to  related  web  pages.  GovTrack  GovTrack  is  a  helper  for  public  research  about  the  United  States  Congress  and  the  state  legislatures.  Their  goal  is  to  give  government  transparency  and  to  innovate  their  government  with  this  transparency.  Berkeley  BOP  (BBOB)  Our  group  is  focused  on  the  development,  use,  and  integration  of  ontologies  into  biological  data  analysis.  We  invite  you  to  learn  more  about  our  projects  and  people.  Jamendo  Jamendo  is  a  dataset  of  Creative  Commons  licensed  music,  based  in  France.  It  publishes  a  set  of  URL’s  with  an  RDF  representation  holding  links  to  external  datasets.  6.  For  each  of  the  four  datasets  you  selected,  list  a  scheme  or  ontology  used  by  that  dataset.  Are  there  ontologies  that  are  commonly  used?  LinkedMDB   • Actor   • Performance   • Writer  GovTrack  (searching  for  politicians)   • State   • Addresse   • Zip  code  Berkeley  BOB  (BBOB)   • malaria_ontology   • plant_environment:  Jamendo   • nameOfArtist   • nameOfSong  
  3. 3. There  could  probably  be  lots  of  commonly  used  ontologies.  However  these  datasets  are  not  that  alike  and/or  the  same  naming  convention  could  mean  something  else  (Homonyms).  We  could  state  that  (for  example)  ‘nameOfArtist’  could  also  be  available  inside  the  LinkedMDB  and  Jamendo  database.  However  the  meaning  of  Artist  could  differ  between  the  movie  dataset  (LinkedMDB)  and  the  music  dataset  (Jamendo).    However  in  some  cases  they  could  refer  to  the  same  class.  For  example  if  you  would  search  for  ‘nameOfArtist’  in  both  Jamendo  and  LinkedMDB  we  could  get  an  actor  who  is  also  a  musician  (i.e.  Will  Smith).  7.  What  is  the  relation  between  RDF,  RDFS  and  OWL?  RDF  RDF  is  a  standard  model  for  data  sharing  throughout  the  web  and  describes  a  data  model.  ‘RDF  extends  the  linking  structure  of  the  Web  to  use  URIs  to  name  the  relationship  between  things  as  well  as  the  two  ends  of  the  link’  Using  this  simple  model,  it  allows  structured  and  semi-­‐structured  data  to  be  mixed,  exposed,  and  shared  across  different   2applications.’  RDFS    RDFS  are  vocabularies  for  describing  ontologies  in  RDF.  A  developer  can  use  RDFS  to  give  meaning  to  vocabularies.  By  using  RDFS  we  can  in  stead  refer  to  just  to  individual  object  to  a  certain  class.    OWL    Owl  is  an  ontology  language  where  you  can  describe  how  data  is  linked  together  and  you  can  set  certain  constraints  and  restrictions  on  this  data.  I.e.  that  a  parent  could  only  have  one  child.  This  enables  us  to  give  more  specified  information  about  a  certain  object.    The  relation  between  these  above  three  is  that  they  describe  a  data  model.  They  are  distinguished  by  each  other  because  one  model  is  more  specific  then  the  other  or  in  a  is  describing  data  in  a  different  way.       348.  What  is  RDFa  (Resource  Sescription  Framework  in  attributes)   ?    RDFa  is  a  specification  for  attributes  to  be  used  with  languages  such  as  HTML  and  XHTML  to  express  structured  data  and  it’s  a  tool  for  HTML  authors  to  link  data  together  in  a  structural  manner.  These  authors  are  able  to  add  a  set  of  attribute-­‐level  extensions  to  HTML,  XHTML  and  XML.  An  example  of  a  goal  of  this  usage  is  when  you  order  a  concert  ticket  and  you’ll  have  it  scheduled  in  your  agenda  right  away.  If  you  would  zoom  in  to  all  our  data  and  would  give  taqs  and  hints  for  our  computer  programs  then  this  would  become  very  helpful  because  they  start  to  understand  the  data  it’s  structure.      9.  What  is  the  relationship  between  the  Facebook  Open  Graph  Protocol   5and  RDFa?    They  both  are  defining  the  action  or  path  that  the  data  should  be  linked  to.  So  links  are  being  created  to  the  properties  of  a  certain  user.  Also  mobile  applications  can  create  new  links  to  the  exisiting  facebook  web  by  creating  links  to  the  facebook  Open  Graph.  We  also  create  links  with  RDFa  to  certain  objects  by  giving  taqs  and  hints  in  the                                                                                                                          2  http://www.w3.org/RDF/  3  http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml-­‐rdfa-­‐primer/  4  http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/CR-­‐rdfa-­‐syntax-­‐20080620/  5  http://developers.facebook.com/docs/opengraph/    
  4. 4. created  HTML.  10.  Can  you  consider  a  data  dictionary  an  ontology?    No,  because  a  dictionary  has  got  objects  and  the  meaning  of  these  objects,  but  their  not  linked  to  each  other.  Every  objects  defines  itself  and  is  not  referring  or  saying  something  about  other  data  parts.  However  a  CMS  (or  program  alike)  should  be  able  to  give  meaning  (properties)  to  all  our  objects  and  could  possible  be  able  to  link  objects  to  one  and  another.    RDF(S)       61.  Name  four  different  syntaxes  for  RDF.     • Turtle   • RDFa   • RDF-­‐XML   • Notation  3  (n3)    2.  What  is  the  difference  between  the  data  models  of  RDF  and  XML?    Within  XML  there  is  no  definition  of  the  data  that  is  listed.  And  within  RDF  there  is.  That’s  because  RDF  is  a  data  model  and  not  a  data  format.    3.  What  is  the  relation  between  RDF  and  RDFS?     7‘RDF  is  a  universal  language  that  lets  users  describe  resources  in  their  own  vocabularies’.  So  they  both  describe  a  resources.    4.  What  information  of  a  class  can  RDFS  describe?  And  what  information   8of  a  property?    Class   • Rdfs:Resource,  the  class  of  all  resources   • Rdfs:Class,  the  class  of  all  classes   • Rdfs:Literal,  the  call  of  all  literals  (strings)   • Rdf:Property,  the  class  of  all  properties   • Rdf:Statement,  the  class  of  all  reified  statements    Properties   • Rdf:type,  relates  a  resource  to  it’s  class   • Rdfs:subClassOf,  which  relates  a  class  to  one  of  its  superclasses   • Rdfs:subPropertyOf,  relates  a  property  to  one  of  its  superproperties   • Rdfs:domain,  which  specifies  the  domain  of  a  property   • Rdfs:range                                                                                                                            6  http://www.w3.org/TeamSubmission/n3/  7  http://ids.snu.ac.kr/w/images/8/85/WEC_2009_RDF_RDFS.pdf    8  http://ids.snu.ac.kr/w/images/8/85/WEC_2009_RDF_RDFS.pdf  
  5. 5. 5.  Give  two  example  inferences  that  you  can  draw  in  RDFS,  using  IF-­‐  THEN  rules  (for  each  rule,  give  the  antecedents  and  conclusion).   1. IF   PvdA  owl:sameAs  VVD   Barry  voted  VVD   THEN   Barry  voted  PvdA     2. IF   Human  owl:sameAs  Person   Barry  isA  Person   THEN   Barry  isA  Human    Ontology  This  assignment  has  been  made  together  with  Eric  de  Rijcke  (Vu  studentID:  2523479).  The  domain  we  have  chosen  for  is  ‘common  food’.  RDFS  scheme  @prefix rdf: <http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns# > .@prefix rdfs: <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema# > .@prefix ex: <http://www.example.org/> .@prefix food: <http://www.example.org/food/> .ex:Vegetables rdfs:subClassOf ex:Holland .ex:Candy rdfs:subClassOf ex:Holland .ex:Kale rdf:type ex:Vegetables .ex:Endive rdf:type ex:Vegetables .ex:Stroopwaffle rdf:type ex:Candy .ex:Drop rdf:type ex:Candy .food:typical rdfs:range ex:Holland .ex:FoodOfCountry food:typical ex:Japan .      Validation  Confirmation        
  6. 6.  Diagram      

×