Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Barry’s YALILearns session on Media Literacy.pptx

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 16 Ad

Barry’s YALILearns session on Media Literacy.pptx

"Media and Information Literacy consists of the knowledge, the attitudes, and the sum of the skills needed to know when and what information is needed; where and how to obtain that information; how to evaluate it critically and organise it once it is found; and how to use it in an ethical way. The concept extends beyond communication and information technologies to encompass learning, critical thinking, and interpretative skills across and beyond professional and educational boundaries. Media and Information Literacy includes all types of information resources: oral, print, and digital. Media and Information Literacy is a basic human right in an increasingly digital, interdependent, and global world, and promotes greater social inclusion. It can bridge the gap between the information rich and the information poor. Media and Information Literacy empowers and endows individuals with knowledge of the functions of the media and information systems and the conditions under which these functions are performed" (IFLA, 2011).

"We live in a world where the quality of information we receive largely determines our choices and ensuing actions, including our capacity to enjoy fundamental freedoms and the ability for self-determination and development. Driven by technological improvements in telecommunications, there is also a proliferation of media and other information providers through which vast amounts of information and knowledge are accessed and shared by citizens. Adding to and emanating from this phenomenon is the challenge to assess the relevance and the reliability of the information" (UNESCO, p. 11, 2011).

"Media and Information Literacy consists of the knowledge, the attitudes, and the sum of the skills needed to know when and what information is needed; where and how to obtain that information; how to evaluate it critically and organise it once it is found; and how to use it in an ethical way. The concept extends beyond communication and information technologies to encompass learning, critical thinking, and interpretative skills across and beyond professional and educational boundaries. Media and Information Literacy includes all types of information resources: oral, print, and digital. Media and Information Literacy is a basic human right in an increasingly digital, interdependent, and global world, and promotes greater social inclusion. It can bridge the gap between the information rich and the information poor. Media and Information Literacy empowers and endows individuals with knowledge of the functions of the media and information systems and the conditions under which these functions are performed" (IFLA, 2011).

"We live in a world where the quality of information we receive largely determines our choices and ensuing actions, including our capacity to enjoy fundamental freedoms and the ability for self-determination and development. Driven by technological improvements in telecommunications, there is also a proliferation of media and other information providers through which vast amounts of information and knowledge are accessed and shared by citizens. Adding to and emanating from this phenomenon is the challenge to assess the relevance and the reliability of the information" (UNESCO, p. 11, 2011).

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Recently uploaded (20)

Advertisement

Barry’s YALILearns session on Media Literacy.pptx

  1. 1. #YALICHECKS
  2. 2. • Introduction • Ways of curbing misinformation • News and media literacy tools
  3. 3. Media literacy is the ability to identify different types of media (means and institutions for publishing and broadcasting information) and the messages they are sending. In today’s digital age, it is easy for anyone to create media, and sometimes difficult for consumers to understand why something was created and whether it’s credible.
  4. 4. It is increasingly important to be an educated media consumer to help stop the spread of incorrect information. Being a leader in your community starts with sharing information responsibly and contributing to an accurate information environment. The prompts in this session will help you identify your media literacy skills and direct you to useful tools and resources.
  5. 5. The following measures will enable you learn how you could protect your reputation and community by preventing misinformation.
  6. 6. i. Stop In the rapidly expanding and increasingly open information world in which we live, there are good and bad actors. It’s on you to commit to being a responsible promoter of reliable and credible information. That starts by stopping to pause when you receive new information.
  7. 7. ii. Reflect Reflecting on the information before you share it involves reading the whole story, not just the headline. That means examining your own biases and those of the person or organization that sent it to you. Ask yourself if multiple voices and viewpoints are represented. Are those voices credible? What is the evidence, and is it verifiable on other channels or websites?
  8. 8. iii.Verify Don’t be taken in by shocking or flashy headlines. Read the story that accompanies it. If the headlines greatly exaggerate or misrepresent the information in the story — don’t share it. Also, misspellings and grammatical errors are usually a sign that something is not from a professional source. Be sure to make note of the facts cited in the story, then do a search to see if you can verify them.
  9. 9. Recommended resources to stay up to date on the latest misinformation loopholes and to ensure that you’re ready to stop, reflect, and verify are described in the next few slides.
  10. 10. i. Making a Change: Media Literacy (https://newseumed.org/curated- stack/making-change-media- literacy) This website from the Newseum offers a wealth of resources to better understand how misinformation spreads and what you can do to recognize it. The site’s videos and courses are useful too, for teaching friends and family about media literacy, why it matters, and how it affects your reputation.
  11. 11. ii. The News Literacy Project (https://newslit.org/) This site features nonpartisan, independent programs to help you separate fact from fiction in the digital age. The project’s resources also provide you with the tools you need to teach others how to become smart, active consumers of news and information and engaged, informed participants in their communities.
  12. 12. iii.The Columbia Journalism Review (https://www.cjr.org/) Monitoring the press in all its forms, CJR is an essential resource both for journalists and for others in communications, technology, academia and related fields. Calling attention to the media’s shortcomings and its strengths, the site will help you to better understand and promote the standards of honest, responsible journalism.
  13. 13. 1. Where do you go to get your daily news? Example: I get most of my news from Facebook and from conversations with my friends. 2. How do you determine that a person or website is credible? Example: I run a Google search of the author’s name. 3. What steps do you take to determine that a story is accurate? Example: I check to see if the story includes quotes from experts in the field.
  14. 14. 4. What other factors, in addition to the story itself, might affect your judgment of a story? Example: I might be in a hurry and not take the time to fact-check the source. 5. Why should you carefully evaluate websites before using and sharing their information? Example: Sharing false information can be damaging to my reputation and career success.
  15. 15. Please remember to subscribe, like, share, comment and leave your feedback on our various social media handles. #YALILearns #YALICares #Africa4HerWomen’sHealth #YALINetwork #YALICHECKS

×