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Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step

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My talk from the 2015 Big Design Conference in Dallas, TX. Discusses how the use of biometric capture devices may give us a new tool in our user experience research toolkit.

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Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step

  1. 1. 1 PREPARED BY BIOMETRICS IN UX RESEARCH: THE NEXT BIG STEP September 19, 2015 Big Design Conference Dan Berlin, Managing Director, Experience Research
  2. 2. 2 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Today’s Talk • State of UX Research Today • What are Biometrics? • Using Biometrics for UX Research • Biometric Research Going Forward
  3. 3. 3 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Hi! I’m Dan Berlin • BA in Psychology from Brandeis U. • Seven years of tech support • Participant in a usability study and discovered the world of UX • Quit my job • Did a 2.5 year program at Bentley U. to get an MBA and MS in Human Factors in Information Design • Have been doing UX research for eight years • Managing Director of Experience Research at Mad*Pow, a design agency in New England
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  5. 5. 5 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step State of UX Research TodayUX Research Today
  6. 6. 6 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step State of UX Research TodayUX Research Today One on one In-Depth-Interviews (IDIs)
  7. 7. 7 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step State of UX Research TodayUX Research TodayUX Research Today In-situ observation (ethnography)
  8. 8. 8 UX Research Today Observation in the wild
  9. 9. 9 Qualitative Methods Are…
  10. 10. 10 Observation in the wild
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  12. 12. 12
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  15. 15. 15
  16. 16. 16 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Automated Usability Studies
  17. 17. 17 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Eye Tracking Has Come A Long Way
  18. 18. 18 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Eye Tracking Has Come A Long Way
  19. 19. 19 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step How Eye Tracking Works
  20. 20. 20 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step
  21. 21. 21 Heat Map
  22. 22. 22 Heat Creep Map
  23. 23. 23 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Eye Tracking as a Comparison Tool (Galfino, et al., 2012)
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  25. 25. 25 Where are people looking at a given point in time?
  26. 26. 26 WHAT ARE BIOMETRICS?
  27. 27. 27 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step What Are Biometrics?
  28. 28. 28 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step What Are Biometrics?
  29. 29. 29 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step What Are Biometrics? Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) • Measures stress levels via skin’s electrical conductivity
  30. 30. 30 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step What Are Biometrics? Blood Volume Pulse (BVP) • Measures valence (positive or negative stress) via amount of blood in the fingertips (Scheirer, Fernandez, Klein, & Picard, 2002)
  31. 31. 31 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step What Are Biometrics?
  32. 32. 32 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step What Are Biometrics?
  33. 33. 33 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step What Are Biometrics?
  34. 34. 34 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step What Are Biometrics?
  35. 35. 35 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step What Are Biometrics?
  36. 36. 36 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Fun & Games
  37. 37. 37 USING BIOMETRICS FOR UX RESEARCH
  38. 38. 38 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Seeking a New Tool (Rohrer, 2014)
  39. 39. 39 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Seeking a New Tool (Rohrer, 2014)
  40. 40. 40 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Measuring Emotion • Arousal (stress) • Calm to excited • Valence (affect) • Positive to negative (Posner, Russell, & Peterson, 2005)
  41. 41. 41 (Ward, Marsden, Cahill, & Johnson, 2002)
  42. 42. 42 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Using Biometrics for UX Research
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  44. 44. 44 Best Practices
  45. 45. 45 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Best Practices
  46. 46. 46 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Best Practices • Inform the recruiter and respondents informed about the use of biometric tools • Explain the sensors to participants as you attach them • Minimize distractions, including outside noise
  47. 47. 47 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Running the Study • Start with a resting period • Surfing the web or reading a magazine • Do an easy, baseline task then move on to the stimulus task • Ideally, this is done before each stimulus, but okay if not Baseline Task (1 min) Stimulus Task Stimulus Task Ideal AcceptableResting (5 mins)
  48. 48. 48 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step Analyzing Data • Data over time • Normalize the data and plot it over time to find trends and events • Significant events • Determine % change from baseline and find spikes/dips • Specific events • Look at the data during the time the participant was interacting with something specific
  49. 49. 49 GOING FORWARD
  50. 50. 50 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step More Research is Needed… Much More • Does it all work as expected? Does it behave as the literature shows? • Recreate the studies of the early 2000s with modern equipment and interfaces • What additional value does it provide beyond current qualitative measures? At what cost? • Comparative studies between traditional usability studies and biometric studies • What methods work best? What methods don’t work well? • Comparative studies between different moderation and analysis methods
  51. 51. 51 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step More Research is Needed… Much More • The equipment and software is getting cheaper by the day • Anyone can do this type of research • Don’t forget to tell us what does and doesn’t work!
  52. 52. 52 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step For More Information Eye Tracking: A comprehensive guide to methods and measures. Kenneth Holmqvist, et. al., Oxford University Press, 2011. Eye Tracking the User Experience. Aga Bojko, Rosenfeld Media, 2013. Eye Tracking in User Experience Design. Jennifer Romano-Bergstrom & Andrew Schall, Morgan Kaufman, 2014.
  53. 53. 53 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step For More Information Psychophysiology: Human Behavior & Physiological Response. John L. Andreassi, Psychology Press, 2006. The Handbook of Psychophysiology. John Cacioppo, Louis G. Tassinary, & Gary G. Berntson, 2007.
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  55. 55. 55 Biometrics in UX Research: The Next Big Step References Galfino, G., Dalmaso M., Marzoli D., Pavan, G., Coricelli C., & Castelli L. (2012). Eye gaze cannot be ignored (but neither can arrows). Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 65(10), 1895- 1910. doi: 10.1080/17470218.2012.663765 Posner, J., Russell JA., Peterson, BS. (2005 Summer) The circumplex model of affect: an integrative approach to affective neuroscience, cognitive development, and psychopathology. Development and Psychopathology, 17(3), 715-734. Rohrer, C. (2014, October 12). When to Use Which User-Experience Research Methods. Retrieved from: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/which-ux-research-methods Scheirer, J., Fernandez, R., Klein, J., & Picard, R. (2002). Frustrating the User on Purpose: A Step Toward Building an Affective Computer. MIT Media Laboratory Perceptual Computing Section Technical Report No. 509. Retrieved from: http://vismod.media.mit.edu/tech-reports/TR-509.pdf Ward, R., Marsden, P., Cahill, B., & Johnson C. (2002). Physiological Responses to Well-Design and Poorly Designed Interfaces. Proceedings of CHI 2002 Workshop on Physiological Computing. Minneapolis, MN, USA.

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