NISO Webinar: Behave like a Startup: Adapting Your Organization to Rapid Change

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During a recent BookExpo meeting, a publishing company executive asserted, "Any company that isn't behaving like a start-up is doomed." What does this mean in the context of service organizations such as libraries, as well as businesses that serve the library industry such as publishers and vendors? How can large institutions be more nimble, act more quickly, adopt new tech more easily? What can be learned from startups and what can be avoided?

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  • Organizational structure of projectRole of Core Team as intermediaryCommitment of functional analysts and subject matter expertsCode size1.3M lines of code (includes KFS and Rice)1727 JIRAsSignificant resource commitment for code demonstration Not just the software infrastructure – Rice, KFS, Jackrabbit, Solr Data prep and loading Driver’s Manual
  • All standards basedShifted much of the content intelligence into the back end, so the front end was for display and various interfaces would allow different devices and personalities and applications.
  • Topic, theme, event based siteContent-aggregationTraffic-drivingLightweightDiscoverabilityMonetizationUser experience
  • NISO Webinar: Behave like a Startup: Adapting Your Organization to Rapid Change

    1. 1. http://www.niso.org/news/events/2013/webinars/startupBehave Like a Startup: Adapting Your Organization to Rapid Change NISO Webinar: January 9, 2013 Speakers: Brian Matthews Michael Winkler John Sack
    2. 2. THINKING LIKE A STARTUPBEHAVING LIKE AN R&D SHOP pathways to innovation Brian Mathews Virginia Tech NISO January 2013
    3. 3. Imagine the process of stretching telephone cable 3,000 miles… …under the ocean.1957
    4. 4. TELSTAR transformed communications1962
    5. 5. TECHNOLOGIES DISCOVERY SYSTEMS PEDAGOGIES PUBLISHING MODELS LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS PARTNERSHIPS TUITION STRUCTURES CREDENTIALING PROCESSES ATTITUDES, PREFERENCES, ANDNEW EXPECTATIONS
    6. 6. “Libraries, traditionally “Moving from afocused on the products collection-centeredof scholarship, are now model to anprompted to understand engagement-centeredand support the process one does not happenof scholarship.” overnight.”
    7. 7. THINK LIKEA STARTUPan organizationdedicated to creatingsomething new underconditions of extremeuncertainty
    8. 8. A STARTUP IS… an organization searching for a profitable, scalable, reliable model. valuable
    9. 9. New GrowthValue
    10. 10. BUILD * MEASURE * LEARN FEEDBACK LOOP
    11. 11. Three Essential Qualities “Entrepreneurialism is 1.Usable about constantly creating and testing theses.” Bob Summers, TechPad 2.Feasible 3.Valuable**This is why most startups fail!
    12. 12. FLEXIBLE WORKSPACE space wasn’t usable assistance services
    13. 13. EXAM CRAMscale wasn’t feasibleassistance services
    14. 14. SKYPE A LIBRARIAN service wasn’t valuableCourtesy of Char Booth
    15. 15. NCSU LEARNING COMMONSlessons from bean bags
    16. 16. NCSU Virtual Bookshelflet the community be involved in improving it
    17. 17. VT LibrariesWriting Center + other support agencies
    18. 18. Increase: Sharing, Publishing, & Archiving of Scientific
    19. 19. R&D @ UC Santa Barbara We really don’t know anything about graduate students• Libraries are for undergrads, didn‟t want be there• 90% used Google Scholar and couldn‟t name core databases (but knew the core journals)• Half didn‟t view database access as a library service, thought it was provided by dept/campus/free• Kindles in labs: wanted non-scholarly content• Website that gathers all grad related support materials together• Classes, videos, or handouts on getting published, giving conference talks, & applying for grants• Need help getting organized and time management
    20. 20. R&D @ Virginia TechCurriculum Visualization• Our instructional effort is not feasible, scalable and in some cases is not valuable• How can we strategically package instruction content across the curriculum• Talking with profs, advisors, and students in several departments
    21. 21. Consider the value of phonelines to a wireless society.
    22. 22. www.brianmathews.comFree copies of startup & R&D papers
    23. 23. Kuali OLE : Behaving Like a Startup An Agile Approach to Community Source Software Michael Winkler | Director of Information Technologies & Digital Development | University of Pennsylvania Email: winkler4@upenn.edu | Twitter: @winkler4 NISO Webinars | Behaving Like a Startup | 01.09.13
    24. 24. A Word or Two About Kuali OLENISO Webinars | Behaving Like a Startup | 01.09.13
    25. 25. Building an ILS Integrated Library System Open source Enterprise caliber Scales to research university and consortia size Service-oriented architecture FlexibleNISO Webinars | Behaving Like a Startup | 01.09.13
    26. 26. NISO Webinars | Behaving Like a Startup | 01.09.13
    27. 27. Kuali OLE as a Community Aligned vision Shared resources and commitment Working together is strategic  Differences not as great as similarities  Risk mitigation through shared investment  Shared knowledge and effort  Intentional collaboration Software for academic libraries, http://www.cowlitzsheriff.org/community.html built by academic libraries Vendors and Open Communities Agile approach: Appealing and consistent NISO Webinars | Behaving Like a Startup | 01.09.13
    28. 28. The Promise of Agile Quick Tight alignment Practical Opportunistic Documentation & testing Buy in http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coding_Shots_Annual_Plan_high_res-5.jpg Demonstrable progress NISO Webinars | Behaving Like a Startup | 01.09.13
    29. 29. Challenges of Agile Mechanics of a multi-institution project  Time constraints  Details  Scale  Proximity – miles and time zones  On-boarding new participants Barriers to Agile  Research and planning  “If we knew what it was we were doing it wouldn‟t be called research, would it?” - Einstein  Learning curves  For analyst and coders  For functional experts  Organizational structure of project  Code size  Resource commitment for demonstration NISO Webinars | Behaving Like a Startup | 01.09.13
    30. 30. Response to Challenges Recognize Evolution  From startup  To architecture  To code production  Acknowledging and accepting decisions  Already moving to implementation phase Reorganize to Match http://blog.pathway.com/the-ah-ha-moments-in-human-genetics/  Development managers  Functional analysts  Move closer to developers  Set timeline and tie deliverables to timeline Webinars | Behaving Like a Startup | 01.09.13 NISO
    31. 31. Lessons Learned No place for ego! Don‟t be afraid to change! Act – Recognize and deal! Match to phase!  And prepare for phase changes Resource Agile process! http://socialchange.is/4-lessons-ive-learned-from-launching-a- Be Agile! successful-non-profit/einstein-lessons-learned/#!prettyPhoto NISO Webinars | Behaving Like a Startup | 01.09.13
    32. 32. Startup behavior atStanford‟s HighWireCan an 18-year-old still act like a startup?(and get away with it?)Presenter: John Sack, FoundingDirectorDate: January 9, 2013
    33. 33. “Foster…a…culture…to drive innovation”HighWire | Stanford University 33
    34. 34. Why “behave like a startup”?• Speed• Innovation• 20 hour days• Lots of pizza• Sleep at work• Don‟t get paid for months…HighWire | Stanford University 34
    35. 35. University-based “Startups”• HighWire is a department inside the Stanford University Libraries• University infrastructure, or bureaucracy? – HR policy changes – Facility policy changesHighWire | Stanford University 35
    36. 36. HighWire | Stanford University 36
    37. 37. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles• Pivots• Feedback loops• Skunkworks• MVP• Free stuff• Dog food• Demo or Die• Stealth• Platforms• White spaceHighWire | Stanford University 37
    38. 38. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles Move quickly, not• Pivots completely• Feedback loops• Skunkworks• MVP• Free stuff• Dog food• Demo or Die• Stealth• Platforms• White spaceHighWire | Stanford University 38
    39. 39. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles• Pivots Identify what’s working and• Feedback loops make that the business• Skunkworks• MVP• Free stuff• Dog food• Demo or Die• Stealth• Platforms• White spaceHighWire | Stanford University 39
    40. 40. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles• Pivots• Feedback loops Get feedback from the• Skunkworks market/customers and• MVP make sure you learn from it and adapt with it• Free stuff• Dog food• Demo or Die• Stealth• Platforms• White spaceHighWire | Stanford University 40
    41. 41. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles• Pivots• Feedback loops• Skunkworks Create a separate• MVP organization that is totally• Free stuff focused on making it to market• Dog food• Demo or Die• Stealth• Platforms• White spaceHighWire | Stanford University 41
    42. 42. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles• Pivots• Feedback loops• Skunkworks• MVP Minimal Viable Product –• Free stuff don’t gild the lily, ship it• Dog food• Demo or Die• Stealth• Platforms• White spaceHighWire | Stanford University 42
    43. 43. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles• Pivots• Feedback loops• Skunkworks• MVP• Free stuff Leverage open source and• Dog food services already built out• Demo or Die and accessible by APIs, web services, etc.• Stealth• Platforms• White spaceHighWire | Stanford University 43
    44. 44. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles• Pivots• Feedback loops• Skunkworks• MVP• Free stuff• Dog food As in, “startups eat their• Demo or Die own dog food”• Stealth• Platforms• White spaceHighWire | Stanford University 44
    45. 45. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles• Pivots• Feedback loops• Skunkworks• MVP• Free stuff• Dog food• Demo or Die Set a ship date that matters• Stealth somewhere in the real• Platforms world – a date you can’t change –• White space and hit itHighWire | Stanford University 45
    46. 46. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles• Pivots• Feedback loops• Skunkworks• MVP• Free stuff• Dog food• Demo or Die• Stealth Don’t talk, DO.• Platforms• White spaceHighWire | Stanford University 46
    47. 47. Characteristics• Rapid product cycles• Pivots• Feedback loops• Skunkworks• MVP• Free stuff• Dog food• Demo or Die• Stealth Deliver a tool or capability• Platforms that others can leverage,• White space not just an “application”.HighWire | Stanford University 47
    48. 48. Characteristics of a Startup• Rapid product cycles• Pivots• Feedback loops• Skunkworks• MVP• Free stuff• Dog food• Demo or Die• Stealth• Platforms Find an empty niche to fill,• White space not a crowded spaceHighWire | Stanford University 48
    49. 49. Some Examples from Stanford‟s HighWire• Shift from traditional platform to “HighWire Open Platform” to enable others – Drupal-enabled front-end – Mini-sites – Mobile-web sites – APIs – Co-development with publishers• Feedback from end-users – Suggestion forms – Detailed interviews• Network/community effects – „Toll-free‟ inter-journal links – Free back issues – Alerting – Publishers‟ community• Discovery – Google, Google Scholar – Microdata, Linked Open DataHighWire | Stanford University 49
    50. 50. Drupal-enabled Front-EndRethink the front-end (user interface) toimprove cost, resource availability, time tomarket, flexibility• Take advantage of layered Highwire Open Platform• Open source tools• Many „modules‟ (extensions)• Widely-adopted• Significant third-party support• Example: boneandjoint.org.ukHighWire | Stanford University 50
    51. 51. Mini-sitesEnable short-cycle, low-costexperimentation to test product ideas withusers• Drupal-based templates• A couple of days to build a site• Use monitoring tools to observe usage• Example: sustainability.pnas.orgHighWire | Stanford University 51
    52. 52. Mobile-web sitesDeliver mobile-optimized versions of everyHighWire journal site; time to market wascritical priority• Drupal-based• Start with a clean slate and build up, rather than prune down the general website• Keep it simple, templated• 1200 sites delivered in 15 monthsHighWire | Stanford University 52
    53. 53. APIsGive other developers access to content tobuild products/services, bypassing the front-end user-interface• APIs for metadata, content, search, authentication/authorization• Eventually support text/data mining using industry standards in developmentHighWire | Stanford University 53
    54. 54. Co-development with Publishers• Divide up the work so publisher and HighWire can do implementation work on a project in parallel• Drupal-based, so developers need to know Drupal, not HighWire• HighWire Integration Module extends Drupal• Agile project techniques• Example: www.bmj.comHighWire | Stanford University 54
    55. 55. Feedback from End-UsersDetailed interviews, ethnographic-style, tokeep us aware of user tasks, workflows• 45 interviews with researchers in 2011/12• Feeds back into product development• To be published in Learned Publishing• Interviewing clinicians/practitioners 2012/13• Students and teachers should followHighWire | Stanford University 55
    56. 56. Network/community Effects• Figure out where an electronic resource and workflow can be different… …and better• Inter-journal links• „Toll-free‟ inter-journal links• Free back issuesHighWire | Stanford University 56
    57. 57. DiscoveryRecognize the tools people actually use,and improve content visibility (ranking),accuracy (correctness, completeness) andcurrency (up-to-date-ness) in those tools• Google & Google Scholar• Make it better, not perfectHighWire | Stanford University 57
    58. 58. Thank you.- John Sack, sack@stanford.edu
    59. 59. THANK YOU Thank you for joining us today.Please take a moment to fill out the brief online survey. We look forward to hearing from you!

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