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WELCOME 
Preston University 1 
 Introduction 
 Text Book/Reference Materials 
 Contents 
 Assessment 
 Quiz 10% 
 As...
RECRUITMENT & SELECTION 
By Air Cdre ( R ) Anwar Saeed
Difference between Recruitment and Selection 
Recruitment is the process of searching the 
candidates for employment and s...
Difference between Recruitment and Selection 
• The basic purpose of 
Recruitments is to create a talent 
pool of candidat...
TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS 
By Air Cdre ( R ) Anwar Saeed
TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS 
• Selection is to match people to work 
• ‘Work’ is more than the range of tasks...
TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS 
Selection process Flow Chart 
Analyze Role 
Develop competencies/person 
specifi...
TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS 
Person Specification 
The specification embraces a profile of the role and of th...
TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS 
Competencies 
• The term ‘competencies’ is used to describe all the work-related...
TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS 
Response 
• The response process is usually based on application forms or curric...
TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS 
Testing 
• Psychological tests 
Psychological tests use systematic and standardi...
TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS 
Exercises 
• The key elements in establishing work simulations are to develop ex...
TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS 
Check and Offers 
• Terms and conditions to be provided within two months of tak...
LLAABBOOUURR MMAARRKKEETTSS 
By Air Cdre ( R ) Anwar Saeed
LLAABBOOUURR MMAARRKKEETTSS 
Types of Market 
Economic 
The classic economic theories divide labour markets: 
• Internal L...
LLAABBOOUURR MMAARRKKEETTSS 
Types of Market 
Geographic 
A third way of looking at labour markets is on a geographical ba...
LLAABBOOUURR MMAARRKKEETTSS 
Labour Market Changes 
• Labour shortages in the 1980s which accompanied growth of organizati...
LLAABBOOUURR MMAARRKKEETTSS 
Accessing Markets 
• Employment centres, such as careers service or job centres or 
unemploym...
Recruitment & selection  c 1 & 2 16-09-2010
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Recruitment & selection c 1 & 2 16-09-2010

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Recruitment & selection c 1 & 2 16-09-2010

  1. 1. WELCOME Preston University 1  Introduction  Text Book/Reference Materials  Contents  Assessment  Quiz 10%  Ass/PR 10%  Mid Quarter Exam 25%  Final Exam 50%  Cp 05%  Rules of the class  Mobiles on “Silent” please  “No class within class” please
  2. 2. RECRUITMENT & SELECTION By Air Cdre ( R ) Anwar Saeed
  3. 3. Difference between Recruitment and Selection Recruitment is the process of searching the candidates for employment and stimulating them to apply for jobs in the organization Selection involves the series of steps by which the candidates are screened for choosing the most suitable persons for vacant posts.
  4. 4. Difference between Recruitment and Selection • The basic purpose of Recruitments is to create a talent pool of candidates to enable the selection of best candidates for the organization, by attracting more and more employees to apply in the organization. • Recruitment is a positive process i.e. encouraging more and more employees to apply. • Recruitment is concerned with tapping the sources of human resources • There is no contract of recruitment established in recruitment • The basic purpose of selection process is to choose the right candidate to fill the various positions in the organization. • Selection is a negative process as it involves rejection of the unsuitable candidates. • Selection is concerned with selecting the most suitable candidate through various interviews and tests. • Selection results in a contract of service between the employer and the selected employee.
  5. 5. TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS By Air Cdre ( R ) Anwar Saeed
  6. 6. TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS • Selection is to match people to work • ‘Work’ is more than the range of tasks and activities undertaken; it includes the physical, economic, and social environment in which the activities take place. • The key elements in selection are: o A clear and precise specification o Effective use of multiple techniques o Elimination of redundant processes o Measurement o Evaluation and continuous improvement.
  7. 7. TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS Selection process Flow Chart Analyze Role Develop competencies/person specification Identify Labour Market Attract Candidates Screen Applications Assess (interview, tests, assessment centers etc) Decision Take/check references Short-list Choice reject reject Monitor/revie w Offer Induction
  8. 8. TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS Person Specification The specification embraces a profile of the role and of the ideal person to fill that role. Since selection is about matching people to roles, it is important that both sides of the equation are clearly specified. Poor selectors overlook the necessity of clear role information. Good selectors understand that one of the best judges of a candidate’s suitability for a role is the candidate; helping candidates to gain a clear assessment of the role will provide important benefits. Person specification headings • Knowledge – what the individual need to know to carry out the role. •Skills and abilities – what the individual has to be able to do to carry out the role. •Behavioral competencies – the types of behavior required for successful performance of the role. These should be role specific, ideally based on an analysis of employees who are carrying out their roles effectively. The behaviors should also be linked to the core values and competency framework of the organization to help in ensuring that candidates will fit and support the organization’s culture. As reported by Purcell et al (2003), companies such as Selfridges take great care to develop specifications that define the behaviors required and to use selection techniques that provide for cultural fit between the individual and the organization. •Qualifications and training – the professional, technical or academic qualifications required or the training that the candidate should have undertaken. •Experience – the types of achievement and activities that would be likely to predict success. •Specific demands - anything that the role holder will be expected to achieve in specified areas, eg develop new markets or products, improve sales, productivity or levels of customer services, introduce new systems or processes. •Special requirements – travelling, unsocial hours, mobility, etc.
  9. 9. TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS Competencies • The term ‘competencies’ is used to describe all the work-related personal attributes, knowledge, experience, skills and values that a person draws on to perform their work well. • In many HR applications, such as training or performance management, the competencies are described in terms of behaviors and patterns of work, and the focus is on those competencies which differentiate between effective and superior performance. • For selection purposes a slightly broader approach needs to be taken, for a number of reasons. • First, it is not appropriate to focus only on the competencies which differentiate superior from effective performance. • Second, providing descriptions of the competencies in terms of everyday work behaviors is of only limited value. It is highly likely that candidates will be external to the organization, and/or in a different area of work. • Third, there are great practical constraints which may render it difficult to get examples of the candidates displaying the competencies in everyday work behavior. Attracting • The initial part of the selection process is concerned with ‘selling’ the role. • The process of attracting people to apply for the role requires achievement of a balance. • There need to be sufficient candidates to afford and opportunity to choose, but the quality of candidates needs to be good enough to make such decisions meaningful.
  10. 10. TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS Response • The response process is usually based on application forms or curricula vitae. • The use of application forms adds and additional stage to the overall process because the initial contact from the candidates has to be followed with a response in sending out the forms. • There is, however, the opportunity to send the other information described above and, on occasions, it may therefore be ultimately more cost effective than dealing with direct applications. • The use of an application form means a standardized response against which a great number of candidates can be assessed. Screening • Providing selectors with a clear idea of the competencies to focus on when screening the application form, together with example of good or poor evidence, will significantly improve the quality and consistency of the selection process. • A similar principle can be applied to the screening of curricula vitae, although the varied nature of each candidate’s CV makes the task more difficult and time-consuming. Interviewing Interviewing suffers from a number of problems. 1. It is difficult for the interviewer to sustain attention throughout the interview, with interviewers sometimes able to remember only the opening and closing stages of the interview. 2. Judgment of interviews can sometimes be clouded by prejudices or influenced unduly by stereotyping the candidate with, for example, others in his or her organization, or by ‘mirroring’ in which the interviewer looks more favourably on candidates matching the interviewer’s own profile. 3. Perhaps the most common failing of interviews is the lack of preparation on the part of the interviewer.
  11. 11. TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS Testing • Psychological tests Psychological tests use systematic and standardized procedures to measure differences in individual characteristics such as intelligence and personality. They enable selectors to gain a greater understanding of candidates to help in predicting the extent to which they will be successful in a job. Psychological tests are measuring instruments, which is why they are often referred to as psychometric tests. ‘Psychometric’ literally means mental measurement. For selection purposes, the main types of tests are those used for measuring intelligence and ability and those concerned with assessing personality characteristics. •Intelligence tests •Ability tests •Personality tests The ‘big five’ personality characteristics • Extraversion/introversion – gregarious, outgoing, assertive, talkative and active (extraversion); or reserved, inward-looking, diffident, quiet, restrained (introversion) • Emotional stability – resilient, independent, confident, relaxed; or apprehensive, dependent, under-confident, tense, • Agreeableness – courteous, cooperative, likeable, tolerant; or rude, uncooperative, hostile, intolerant. • Conscientiousness – hard-working, persevering, careful, reliable; or lazy, dilettante, careless, expedient. • Openness to experience – curious, imaginative, willingness to learn, broad-minded; or blinkered, unimaginative, complacent, narrow-minded.
  12. 12. TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS Exercises • The key elements in establishing work simulations are to develop exercises which are realistic, are capable of being observed and evaluated, which encourage true rather than artificial behavior from candidates, and are cost effective. Assessment Centres • Assessors are brought together for debriefing and provide their evaluation of candidates based on overall performance through all the assessment elements. • The main characteristics of assessment centers are : • Exercises are used to capture and simulate the key dimensions of the job. These may include one-to-one role-plays and group exercises; it is assumed that performance in these simulations predicts behavior on the job; • Candidates are interviewed and tested; • Performance is measured in several dimensions in terms of the competencies required to achieve the target level of performance in a particular job or at a particular level in the organization; • Several candidates or participants are assessed together to allow interaction and to make the experience more open and participative; • Several trained assessors or observers are used to increase the objectivity of assessments.
  13. 13. TTHHEE SSEELLEECCTTIIOONN PPRROOCCEESSSS Check and Offers • Terms and conditions to be provided within two months of taking up employment. The information on candidates needs to be checked for authenticity. • This may include documentary checks on qualifications, licenses, etc, statutory check on work eligibility, specialist checks on health and credit or criminal records, and taking up references. • Offers of employment may be conditional or unconditional. • Conditional offers are sometimes based on pre-conditions. Such as receipt of satisfactory references or achievement of an academic qualification. • Some offers are post-conditional, for example they may be subject to satisfactory completion of probationary period. • Offers nee to be clear and explicit, and although there are no legal requirement for a written contract of employment, there is a legal requirement for a statement of main
  14. 14. LLAABBOOUURR MMAARRKKEETTSS By Air Cdre ( R ) Anwar Saeed
  15. 15. LLAABBOOUURR MMAARRKKEETTSS Types of Market Economic The classic economic theories divide labour markets: • Internal Labour Market Internal Labour market is classically defined as the market with a single organization, as opposed to the general labour market covering all forms of employment. • The External Market The external market was concerned with all those who were either in employment or available for employment and it is this group that is featured in all statistical information on labour markets, whether produced by government bodies or others. Social Sociological terms to describe labour markets have been primary and secondary labour markets. •The Primary Market The primary market relates to those in full-time long-term employment. •The Secondary Market The secondary market relates to those in casual, part-time, or temporary work which impact on this perspective.
  16. 16. LLAABBOOUURR MMAARRKKEETTSS Types of Market Geographic A third way of looking at labour markets is on a geographical basis. Traditionally we have been concerned with the difference between local and national markets since some labour is constrained for economic or other reasons to the locality, while ‘career’ jobs have tended to operate on a national market. Thus, lower-paid manual or clerical positions would tend to be resourced from the local labour markets while professional, technical or managerial roles are more likely to be resourced from the national labour market.
  17. 17. LLAABBOOUURR MMAARRKKEETTSS Labour Market Changes • Labour shortages in the 1980s which accompanied growth of organizations have turned to a labour surplus following universal trends to downsizing. • Skills shortage prevail in spite of labour surplus and government intervention (such as Training and Enterprise Councils and National Vocational Qualifications) and such skills shortage are deteriorating in each reported year. • The age composition of the labour market is changing in line with demographic changes so that there are fewer young people and a greater number of older people in the population generally. • The gender composition of the employment market is changing so that male employment is declining and any growth in employment is in female employment. • There is a sectoral shift from manufacturing industry, in which employment is steadily declining, to the leisure and retail sectors where there is growth in employment.
  18. 18. LLAABBOOUURR MMAARRKKEETTSS Accessing Markets • Employment centres, such as careers service or job centres or unemployment offices. • Agencies, sometimes for temporary positions, sometimes for permanent positions and sometime as an out-sourced operation in which the agency acts as a provider of services rather than a broker for labour. • Consultants to undertake search and selection, particularly when searching for high level or more specialized positions where there may be a need to tap into an industry market. • Advertising through various media, whether on a local, national or international basis and whether on a general or specialized focus.

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