Bec doms ppt on leadership management

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Bec doms ppt on leadership management

  1. 1. Leadership Management
  2. 2. Leadership, Management, Accountability and Team Building <ul><li>Leadership is setting a new direction or vision for a group that they follow. A leader is the spearhead for that new direction. </li></ul><ul><li>Management controls or directs people/resources in a group according to principles or values that have already been established. </li></ul><ul><li>Team Building is the process of enabling a group of people to reach their goal. </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability an obligation or willingness to accept responsibility or to account for one's actions. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Leadership and Management <ul><li>Leadership without management </li></ul><ul><li>Sets a direction or vision that others follow, without considering too much how the new direction is going to be achieved. </li></ul><ul><li>Management without leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Controls resources to maintain the status quo or ensure things happen according to already-established plans. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Leadership and Management <ul><li>Leadership combined with management </li></ul><ul><li>Does both - sets a new direction and manages the resources to achieve it. </li></ul><ul><li>Symbolic Leadership </li></ul><ul><li>When a leader acts as a figure-head without setting any direction. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Leadership Qualities What makes a good leader?
  6. 6. Leadership: Organizational or individual perspective <ul><li>Organizational: The aim of an organizational perspective is to improve organizational performance by identifying and developing leadership potential. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Leadership: Organizational or individual perspective <ul><li>The organizational task is therefore one of: </li></ul><ul><li>identifying the profile of leadership qualities that will enhance organizational performance; </li></ul><ul><li>selecting individuals whose character, skills and potential closely match that profile; and </li></ul><ul><li>developing those individuals so their potential becomes a reality. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Leadership: Organizational or individual perspective <ul><li>Individual: An individual's perspective on leadership is very different: </li></ul><ul><li>the aim is for the individual to develop into a position of leadership. </li></ul><ul><li>From this perspective, you are who you are and if your leadership qualities are not valued by the organization, then you are going to find it difficult to progress. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Leadership: Organizational or individual perspective <ul><li>The individual task is therefore one of: </li></ul><ul><li>understanding one's own leadership qualities or potential; and </li></ul><ul><li>selecting an organization or context where those attributes will be valued </li></ul>
  10. 10. Leadership Styles
  11. 11. Leadership Styles <ul><li>Modern leadership demands an ability to adapt one's style to achieve the maximum effectiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>Excellent leaders are able to take different approaches to suit the various needs of differing situations. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Leadership Styles <ul><li>Modern leader will: </li></ul><ul><li>develop flexibility and adaptability to use any of the styles; </li></ul><ul><li>recognize the different demands of each situation; </li></ul><ul><li>use the style(s) that will give optimum success. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Eight Leadership Styles
  14. 14. Leadership Styles <ul><li>I. ACTIVE BLUE: People-oriented, motivator, builds personal relationships, likeable, interpersonal skills, cares for others </li></ul><ul><li>When to use </li></ul><ul><li>Commitment from others is critical, or sensitive situations </li></ul><ul><li>When not to use </li></ul><ul><li>Decisions need to be forced through, conflict is being avoided </li></ul>
  15. 15. ACTIVE BLUE People-oriented, motivator, builds personal relationships, likeable, interpersonal skills, cares for others When to use Commitment from others is critical, or sensitive situations When not to use Decisions need to be forced through, conflict is being avoided
  16. 16. Leadership Styles <ul><li>II. REFLECTIVE BLUE Value-driven, has passion for key issues, focuses on important themes, champions the cause </li></ul><ul><li>When to use </li></ul><ul><li>The group has lost its sense of identity, or it is doing too many unimportant things </li></ul><ul><li>When not to use </li></ul><ul><li>There is a problem that needs to be solved with dispassionate objectivity (eg: technical issues) </li></ul>
  17. 17. REFLECTIVE BLUE Value-driven, passion, focuses , champions the cause When to use Lost its sense of identity When not to use There is a problem that needs to be solved with objectivity
  18. 18. Leadership Styles <ul><li>III. ACTIVE GREEN Tries things that are new, prototypes, introduces change, looks for unexpected outcomes, creates new opportunities, experiments </li></ul><ul><li>When to use </li></ul><ul><li>The group is 'stuck in a rut', or the status quo needs to be challenged </li></ul><ul><li>When not to use </li></ul><ul><li>There are already too many initiatives under way and some stability is needed </li></ul>
  19. 19. ACTIVE GREEN Tries new things, prototypes, introduces change, looks for unexpected outcomes, creates new opportunities, experiments When to use The group is ‘ stuck in a rut', or the status quo needs to be challenged When not to use There are already too many initiatives under way and some stability is needed
  20. 20. Leadership Styles <ul><li>IV. REFLECTIVE GREEN Develops long term vision, produces radical ideas, foresees the future, anticipates what is outside current knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>When to use </li></ul><ul><li>Radical change is needed, change is a long term activity </li></ul><ul><li>When not to use </li></ul><ul><li>There are immediate dangers, the group may not survive in the short term </li></ul>
  21. 21. REFLECTIVE GREEN Visionary, produces radical ideas, foresees the future, anticipates what is outside current knowledge. When to use Radical change is needed, change is a long term activity When not to use There are immediate dangers, the group may not survive in the short term
  22. 22. Leadership Styles <ul><li>V. ACTIVE YELLOW Takes action, produces results, leads from the front, sets an example, does what is asked of others </li></ul><ul><li>When to use </li></ul><ul><li>There is some inertia, or lack of achievement has destroyed motivation </li></ul><ul><li>When not to use </li></ul><ul><li>The group is being too expedient, current success may ebb in the future </li></ul>
  23. 23. ACTIVE YELLOW Takes action, produces results, leads from the front, sets an example, does what is asked of others When to use Lack of achievement has destroyed motivation When not to use The group is being too expedient, current success maybe low in the future
  24. 24. Leadership Styles <ul><li>VI. REFLECTIVE YELLOW Observes, listens, clarifies goals, establishes realistic expectations, makes aims crystal clear </li></ul><ul><li>When to use </li></ul><ul><li>The direction is vague or expectations have not been articulated </li></ul><ul><li>When not to use </li></ul><ul><li>There are already too many goals or too much information </li></ul>
  25. 25. REFLECTIVE YELLOW Observes, listens, clarifies goals, establishes realistic expectations, makes aims crystal clear When to use The direction is vague or expectations have not been articulated When not to use Already too many goals or too much information
  26. 26. Leadership Styles <ul><li>VII. ACTIVE RED Organizes, makes plans, sets measurable goals, coordinates work of different people, manages resources </li></ul><ul><li>When to use </li></ul><ul><li>There is chaos/lack of organization, or there are no measures of achievement </li></ul><ul><li>When not to use </li></ul><ul><li>There are so many processes that creativity has been stifled </li></ul>
  27. 27. ACTIVE RED Organizes, makes plans, sets measurable goals, coordinates work of different people, manages resources When to use There is chaos/lack of organization, or there are no measures of achievement When not to use There are so many processes that creativity has been stifled
  28. 28. Leadership Styles <ul><li>VIII. REFLECTIVE RED Analyses, uses models, produces explanations, compares other situations, engages in intellectual debate </li></ul><ul><li>When to use </li></ul><ul><li>The situation is complex or driven by technical solutions </li></ul><ul><li>When not to use </li></ul><ul><li>People's feelings are paramount, or the group go round in circular arguments </li></ul>
  29. 29. REFLECTIVE RED Analyses, uses models, produces explanations, compares other situations, engages in intellectual debate When to use The situation is complex or driven by technical solutions When not to use People's feelings are paramount, or the group go round in circular arguments
  30. 30. Leadership In Head Start <ul><li>Grantee and delegate agency must propose, within the framework of these regulations, the size of the policy groups ,the procedures for the election of parent members, and the procedure for the selection of community representatives. </li></ul>
  31. 31. Leadership In Head Start <ul><li>Grantee and delegate agencies must have written policies that define the roles and responsibilities of the governing body members and that inform them of the management procedures and functions necessary to implement a high quality program. </li></ul><ul><li>Grantee and delegate agencies must ensure that appropriate internal controls are established and implemented to safeguard Federal funds in accordance with 45 CFR 1301.13. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Leadership In Head Start <ul><li>Grantee and delegate agencies must develop and implement a systematic, ongoing process of program planning; </li></ul><ul><li>Grantees must establish and implement procedures for the ongoing monitoring of their own Early Head Start and Head Start operations, as well as those of each of their delegate agencies, to ensure that these operations effectively implement Federal regulations. </li></ul>
  33. 33. Management Performance and Change Management
  34. 34. Performance Management <ul><li>Performance Management is a process aimed at improving performance (eg: achievement of program objectives). </li></ul><ul><li>Performance Management&quot; is used in two contexts: </li></ul><ul><li>A way of maximizing performance of an individual, team or organization </li></ul><ul><li>A process for dealing with underperforming individuals (or teams). </li></ul>
  35. 35. Performance Management Principles <ul><li>I. Measurement </li></ul><ul><li>Establish performance measures (eg: sales turnover) </li></ul><ul><li>Establish measurable behavioral goals that will improve performance (eg: making 30 prospective phone calls a day) </li></ul><ul><li>Measure current behaviors (eg: logging actual phone calls) </li></ul>
  36. 36. Measurement Establish performance measures sales turnover Establish measurable behavioral goals 30 calls a day Measure current behaviors
  37. 37. Performance Management Principles <ul><li>II. Appraisal </li></ul><ul><li>Compare the current behaviors with the behavioral goals and identify the differences (eg: on average, 20 phone calls are actually being made, giving a shortfall of 10 phone calls). </li></ul>
  38. 38. Appraisal Compare the current behaviors 20 phone calls Behavioral goals 30 calls a day The difference 10 calls
  39. 39. Performance Management Principles <ul><li>III. Action </li></ul><ul><li>For each difference, plan how to bring actual behaviors in line with the goals, in order to improve the performance (eg: introduce a revised telephone script that qualifies the prospect more quickly, shortening each phone call and enabling more calls to be made in the time available) </li></ul><ul><li>Implement the plan (eg: issue the revised script to all telesales people, perhaps with some training to support its use) </li></ul>
  40. 40. Action Actual behavior 20 phone calls Behavioral goals 30 calls a day Improve Performance I. Revised script II. Shortening calls III. Enable more calls Implement the plan I. Issue revised script II. Train Staff
  41. 41. Performance Management Principles <ul><li>IV. Monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>Check to see if the new plans are being followed (eg: review a sample of phone call recordings to determine whether the new script is being used and check that it is 'workable'). </li></ul><ul><li>At appropriate times, return to the appraisal stage to assess the impact of the changes on the behavioral and performance measures (eg: review the average number of calls made per day and sales achieved). </li></ul>
  42. 42. Monitoring Check new plans I. Revised script II. Shortening calls III. Enable more calls New Plans I. Review calls to see if script is followed II. Check to see if its workable Return to Appraisal Compare the current behaviors Behavioral goals The difference
  43. 43. Performance Management Principles Measurement Appraisal Monitoring Action
  44. 44. Maximum vs. Poor Performance <ul><li>Maximum performance </li></ul><ul><li>1. Collaboration between management and staff </li></ul><ul><li>2. Can be informal, with written records only recording revised targets </li></ul><ul><li>3. A process, one of constant improvement </li></ul><ul><li>4. Often involves analysis of the process </li></ul><ul><li>Poor performance </li></ul><ul><li>1. Involves more confrontation </li></ul><ul><li>2. A formal process with each step being written down </li></ul><ul><li>3. A process that escalates into disciplinary proceedings and possible termination </li></ul><ul><li>4. Often involves analysis of one individual's behaviors/attitudes </li></ul>
  45. 45. Performance Management <ul><li>Waste of Potentially Good Ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Failure to listen and comment when workers offer suggestions. </li></ul><ul><li>Failure to encourage workers to offer suggestions. </li></ul><ul><li>Not asking workers advice on problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Failure to read and study about the work and about business methods. </li></ul>
  46. 46. Performance Management <ul><li>Failure to get from new employees helpful ideas which they may bring from previous employment. </li></ul><ul><li>Not consulting enough with other departments, such as technology, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Failure to consider or refer to the proper person all usable suggestions no matter where they come from. </li></ul>
  47. 47. Performance Management <ul><li>Failure to take proper interest in meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>Failure to benchmark performance of organization with other similar organizations and the sector as a whole. </li></ul>
  48. 48. Change Management
  49. 49. Change Management <ul><li>Change management is a basic skill in which most leaders and managers need to be competent. </li></ul><ul><li>There are very few working environments where change management is not important. </li></ul><ul><li>In this section we will take a look at the basic principles of change management, and provides tips on how those principles can be applied. </li></ul>
  50. 50. Change Management <ul><li>Five key principles that need to be kept in mind: </li></ul><ul><li>Different people react differently to change. </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone has fundamental needs that have to be met. </li></ul><ul><li>Change often involves a loss, and people go through the &quot;loss curve“. </li></ul><ul><li>Expectations need to be managed realistically. </li></ul><ul><li>Fears have to be dealt with. </li></ul>
  51. 51. Change Management <ul><li>Tips to apply to the principles when managing change: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Give people information - be open and honest about the facts, but don't give over optimistic speculation. </li></ul><ul><li>2. For large groups, produce a communication strategy that ensures information is disseminated efficiently and comprehensively to everyone (don't let the grapevine take over). This helps to recognize and deal appropriately with the INDIVIDUAL REACTION to change. </li></ul>
  52. 52. Change Management <ul><li>3.Give people choices to make, and be honest about the possible consequences of those choices. Meet their CONTROL and INCLUSION needs. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Give people time, to express their views, and support their decision making, providing coaching, counseling or information as appropriate, to help them through the LOSS CURVE </li></ul>
  53. 53. Change Management <ul><li>5. Where the change involves a loss, identify what will or might replace that loss - loss is easier to cope with if there is something to replace it. This will help easy potential FEARS. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Where it is possible to do so, give individuals opportunity to express their concerns and provide reassurances - also to help easy potential FEARS. </li></ul>
  54. 54. Change Management <ul><li>7. Keep observing good management practice, such as making time for informal discussion and feedback. </li></ul>
  55. 55. Management in Head Start <ul><li>All Early Head Start and Head Start grantee and delegate agencies must use funds from USDA Food and Consumer Services Child Nutrition Programs as the primary source of payment for meal services. </li></ul><ul><li>Grantee and delegate agencies operating center-based programs must establish and implement policies and procedures to respond to medical and dental health emergencies with which all staff are familiar and trained. </li></ul>
  56. 56. Management in Head Start <ul><li>Grantee and delegate agencies must ensure that all staff, consultants, and volunteers abide by the program's standards of conduct. </li></ul><ul><li>The organizational structure must address the major functions and responsibilities assigned to each staff position and must provide evidence of adequate mechanisms for staff supervision and support. </li></ul>
  57. 57. Management in Head Start <ul><li>Grantee and delegate agencies must establish and maintain efficient and effective record-keeping systems to provide accurate and timely information regarding children, families, and staff and must ensure appropriate confidentiality of this information. </li></ul>
  58. 58. Establishing a Team How to functions as a team
  59. 59. Team Building
  60. 60. Team Building <ul><li>“ Team” is a group of people working towards a common goal and/or objective </li></ul><ul><li>“ Terms used in a team building context. </li></ul><ul><li>A group of people; </li></ul><ul><li>Synergy; </li></ul><ul><li>Having one aim; </li></ul><ul><li>Whole > Sum; </li></ul><ul><li>Co-operation; </li></ul>
  61. 61. Team Building <ul><li>Flexibility; </li></ul><ul><li>Working together; </li></ul><ul><li>Reporting to one leader and </li></ul><ul><li>Serving one customer </li></ul>
  62. 62. Team Building <ul><li>From the definition of a team, you have to define the common goal or objective of the team. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, let us suppose that the goal or objective is 'to increase the sales of the company'. </li></ul><ul><li>Sales people; Sell to clients; </li></ul><ul><li>Sales Manager; Ensures the Sales People are equipped to sell properly; </li></ul>
  63. 63. Team Building <ul><li>Marketing Manager; Designs a product that’s attractive to potential buyers </li></ul><ul><li>Accountants; Control the costs of the product to keep it competitively priced </li></ul><ul><li>Administrators; Process the applications quickly so that the client does not lose patience and move to a competitor company </li></ul>
  64. 64. Team Building <ul><li>Personnel; Recruit high performing sales people, and provide training to maximize sales </li></ul>
  65. 65. Team Building <ul><li>Stationery suppliers; Provide marketing literature that looks professional and makes the product seem attractive </li></ul><ul><li>Cleaning staff; Keep sales offices looking attractive, so that clients and prospects feel comfortable visiting the branches </li></ul>
  66. 66. Team Building <ul><li>Stages in team building: </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify the team goals and objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Identify those issues which inhibit the team from reaching their goals and objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Address the issues, remove the inhibitors and enable the goals and objectives to be achieved </li></ul>
  67. 67. Team Building <ul><li>Team Building Scale </li></ul>Individual skills and perceptions Relationships between teams Relationships between people The culture of the organization
  68. 68. Team Dynamics
  69. 69. Team Dynamics <ul><li>Team Dynamics are the unseen forces that operate in a team between different groups of people. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, in a small team of six people, there may be two people who have a particularly strong friendship. </li></ul><ul><li>Friendship is a &quot;natural force&quot; that may have an influence on the rest of the team, and can affect the team positively or negatively. </li></ul>
  70. 70. Team Dynamics <ul><li>The positive effect of a strong friendship in a team might be: </li></ul><ul><li>friends communicate a lot together </li></ul><ul><li>...which naturally results in other members being drawn into the discussion </li></ul><ul><li>...which results in a good 'social' feel to the group </li></ul><ul><li>...which makes people enjoy being in the group </li></ul><ul><li>...which improves motivation and commitment </li></ul>
  71. 71. Team Dynamics <ul><li>The negative effect of a strong friendship might be: </li></ul><ul><li>to cause other people to feel excluded... </li></ul><ul><li>... are less likely to include the friends in decision making </li></ul><ul><li>... are likely to be in groups </li></ul><ul><li>… information may not flow across the whole group, but only within the subgroups </li></ul><ul><li>… miscommunication may lead to misunderstanding and poor collective performance </li></ul>
  72. 72. Team Dynamics <ul><li>How do you recognize team dynamics? </li></ul><ul><li>Personality styles (eg: including or excluding people) </li></ul><ul><li>Team Roles </li></ul><ul><li>Office layout (eg: cupboards dividing teams into two) </li></ul><ul><li>Tools and technology (eg: email, bulletin board, information pool enabling hidden communication). </li></ul>
  73. 73. Team Dynamics <ul><li>Organizational culture (eg: company cars acting as status symbols to separate groups of employees) </li></ul><ul><li>Processes/methodologies/procedures (eg: problem-solving methodology) etc. </li></ul>
  74. 74. Team Dynamics <ul><li>How can team dynamics be managed constructively? </li></ul><ul><li>look for the team dynamics - the 'natural forces' at play </li></ul><ul><li>determine whether they are acting for good or ill, </li></ul><ul><li>make interventions to make the effect of those dynamics more positive. </li></ul>
  75. 75. Accountability Owning It: How Personal Accountability Can Transform an Organization
  76. 76. Accountability <ul><li>For organizations that consistently struggle to meet goals, worker accountability may be an issue. </li></ul><ul><li>Symptoms of accountability deficiencies include </li></ul><ul><li>-blaming and finger-pointing, </li></ul><ul><li>-unclear and changing expectations and </li></ul><ul><li>-difficulty retaining quality employees. </li></ul><ul><li>When any or all of these issues occur, organizations should consider transforming their employees’ behaviors and attitudes with the power of personal accountability. </li></ul>
  77. 77. Accountability <ul><li>When employees take ownership of tasks and plans are clear, personal accountability emerges, </li></ul><ul><li>-lowering stress, </li></ul><ul><li>-increasing productivity, </li></ul><ul><li>-influencing job satisfaction and </li></ul><ul><li>-propelling the organization to meet its goals and objectives. </li></ul>
  78. 78. Accountability Deficiencies
  79. 79. Blame and Finger-Pointing <ul><li>When personal accountability is absent, pinning the blame on others is one of the most common behaviors employees engage in when things go wrong. </li></ul><ul><li>Do any of these charges sound familiar? </li></ul><ul><li>§ &quot;It's because of those strict regulations.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>§ &quot;Our partner dropped the ball.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>§ “Parents just don't participate.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>§ “The warehouse doesn’t delivery supplies timely.&quot; </li></ul>
  80. 80. Blame and Finger-Pointing <ul><li>Blame and finger-pointing stem from a lack of personal accountability and a fear of punishment. </li></ul><ul><li>In this type of environment, employees talk about – rather than to – each other. </li></ul><ul><li>Also, informal meetings that occur after meetings (hallway discussions), are where real opinions are heard. </li></ul>
  81. 81. Blame and Finger-Pointing <ul><li>When employees equate being “held accountable” with demotion or job loss, they will refrain from accepting responsibility for the outcomes of their work. </li></ul><ul><li>If the manager doesn’t model accountability, blame and finger-pointing will be the norm for their employees. </li></ul>
  82. 82. Blame and Finger-Pointing <ul><li>When an accountable employee does something wrong, he or she will say, &quot;This is what I did, and I accept responsibility. </li></ul><ul><li>This is what I learned from my mistake and this is how I will change.&quot; </li></ul>
  83. 83. Unclear and Changing Expectations <ul><li>When managers lack personal accountability, they are often unclear with their expectations or routinely change objectives, resulting in confusion and incomplete goals. </li></ul>
  84. 84. Unclear and Changing Expectations <ul><li>Unclear: </li></ul><ul><li>§ &quot;Diversity is very important and we will embrace it.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>§ &quot;We will change our IT systems to keep up with the times.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>§ &quot;We will focus on innovation this year.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Clear: </li></ul><ul><li>§ “To embrace our diversity, we will be implementing monthly diversity awareness seminars.” </li></ul><ul><li>§ “We need to update our firewalls to keep up with the latest viruses.” </li></ul><ul><li>§ “Our focus on innovation this year will require us to brainstorm better service techniques and processes, and improve quality.” </li></ul>Sample Expectations
  85. 85. Unclear and Changing Expectations <ul><li>Without any kind of clarity, the outcome of these types of expectations is no outcome at all. </li></ul><ul><li>Employees want to know what road to travel, the tasks they need to accomplish and milestones along the way. </li></ul>
  86. 86. Unclear and Changing Expectations <ul><li>To hold employees accountable, </li></ul><ul><li>-tasks must be clearly defined up-front, </li></ul><ul><li>-the expected outcomes must be explained, </li></ul><ul><li>-the stakes of completing/not completing the task made clear, and </li></ul><ul><li>-all parties must agree upon action steps by certain dates. </li></ul>
  87. 87. Difficulty Retaining Quality Employees <ul><li>Often a lack of accountability leads to equal rewards for unequal efforts among employees, spurring the best workers to see no value in working hard to further the goals of the organization. </li></ul><ul><li>High achievers will ultimately leave organizations that do not hold employees accountable. </li></ul>
  88. 88. Difficulty Retaining Quality Employees <ul><li>When a lack of measurement exists, good employees will not prosper. </li></ul><ul><li>To retain high achievers, everyone must be held accountable for their actions. </li></ul>
  89. 89. Other Challenges <ul><li>Additional symptoms that point to a lack of accountability : </li></ul><ul><li>§ Ineffective teamwork </li></ul><ul><li>§ Poor meeting management </li></ul><ul><li>§ Indirect and unclear communication </li></ul><ul><li>§ Gossip </li></ul><ul><li>§ Conflict </li></ul>
  90. 90. Personal Accountability Training <ul><li>Personal accountability training is an effective way to shift the corporate mindset to one of responsibility, empowerment and accountability </li></ul>
  91. 91. Purpose of personal accountability training <ul><li>I. Help employees understand the importance of accountability </li></ul><ul><li>II. Identify why the organization values accountable employees </li></ul><ul><li>III. Discuss each individual's role in the process, and </li></ul><ul><li>IV. Encourage employees to reexamine their attitudes and actions. </li></ul>
  92. 92. The Challenges of Poor Workforce Accountability <ul><li>When everything is working well, accountability is understood and embraced in an organization. However, when problems emerge, excuses seem to be the acceptable alternative. </li></ul><ul><li>Some of the most common signs that personal accountability is absent includes </li></ul><ul><li>blaming others, </li></ul><ul><li>nebulous expectations and </li></ul><ul><li>the inability to retain high achievers. </li></ul>
  93. 93. Steps to Achieving Personal Accountability <ul><li>Workers must take ownership of a task and its outcome at the time it was assigned. </li></ul><ul><li>Employees must have a preexisting mindset that they can and will get tasks accomplished. </li></ul><ul><li>Once employees take responsibility, a clear agreement must be in place between the task assigner and the task owner. </li></ul>
  94. 94. Steps to Achieving Personal Accountability <ul><li>The agreement must clearly articulate the task, the expected results and when it must be completed. </li></ul><ul><li>Employees must be willing to take personal action to see the results occur. </li></ul><ul><li>Employees must be willing to answer for outcomes, whether good or bad. </li></ul>
  95. 95. Benefits of Accountable Employees <ul><li>§ Personal action is taken to overcome obstacles and ensure results are achieved </li></ul><ul><li>§ Results are on target because the task, owner, expected results and deadline are clear </li></ul><ul><li>§ Individuals display a willingness to answer for the results of their actions </li></ul>
  96. 96. Benefits of Accountable Employees <ul><li>§ Productivity increases because employees, teams and entire departments are more effective and individuals agree to own tasks </li></ul><ul><li>§ Job satisfaction improves because tasks are clearly defined and success occurs more </li></ul><ul><li>§ Negative events become learning events </li></ul><ul><li>§ Workarounds and project restarts are significantly reduced </li></ul>
  97. 97. Head Start Accountability <ul><li>Every year, each agency must conduct and maintain a “Program Self Assessment”. </li></ul><ul><li>Every three years, a Head Start grantee must conduct and maintain a “Community Assessment,” designed to ensure that the program is serving the greatest number of eligible children in the local area. Updated annually </li></ul>
  98. 98. Head Start Accountability <ul><li>Every Head Start program must conduct a “Wage Comparability” study every three years to assure that wages paid to Head Start staff are in line with those paid for comparable jobs in the community served by that Head Start grantee. </li></ul>
  99. 99. Head Start Accountability <ul><li>Each program must provide every enrolled child with dental, mental health and health screenings, along with a developmental screening, and maintain files on the results of these screenings. </li></ul><ul><li>For each child with a disability, a “Transition Plan” must be maintained and implemented in accordance with IDEA. </li></ul>
  100. 100. Head Start Accountability <ul><li>Local programs must have written agreements with vendors and service providers and community partners. </li></ul><ul><li>Each program must meet the performance standards for each child and family and have documentation of such progress (individualized family plans, child’s education plan, etc.). </li></ul>
  101. 101. Head Start Accountability <ul><li>Every three years, USDA conducts an on-site audit with respect to the eligibility of children in the program and on food servings (making sure that each meal has met the Daily Requirements). </li></ul><ul><li>State and Local Requirements; i.e. state child care licensing standards. </li></ul>

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