A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
Babasabpati...
A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
Babasabpati...
A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
Babasabpati...
A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
Babasabpati...
A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
Babasabpati...
A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
Babasabpati...
A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR
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A project report on comparative profitability analysis in sugar industry undertaken at shree renuka sugars ltd

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A project report on comparative profitability analysis in sugar industry undertaken at shree renuka sugars ltd

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  • Great Article. Thanks for the info. Does anyone know where I can find a blank "Lease Unit Form" to fill out?
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A project report on comparative profitability analysis in sugar industry undertaken at shree renuka sugars ltd

  1. 1. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 1 Executive Summary Title of the project “Comparative Profitability Analysis in sugar industry- a study undertaken of Munoli and Ajara plant at Shree Renuka Sugars Ltd.” Main Objectives of the Study: o To know the profitability of Munoli and Ajara Plant. o To estimate the Return on investment of both the Plants. o To compare the profitability of the plants. o To project the profitability of the plants for next 2 years. Techniques applied for the study o Return on Investment (ROI) o Linear Trend Analysis. Data Collection o Primary Data: Primary data are those data which are collected directly without the use of any secondary media. Such as Interaction with the company officials o Secondary Data: Secondary data are those which are obtained from sources such as follows: o Annual reports of the company o Internal Financial records of the company o Books
  2. 2. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 2 Need of the study o To know the advantages of setting plants at different locations. o To know the various factors affecting the profitability. Limitation o Profitability analysis is a wide study which involves numerous techniques; each and every aspect of it cannot be dealt in detail. o As this is an external study, the results are not complete and clear as I m having a little idea about practical difficulties facing day to day, except the information provided by the SRSL; o Lastly the study is purely academic. The experience makes this study less precise when compared with a professional study.
  3. 3. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 3
  4. 4. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 4 COMPANY OVERVIEW Founded in October 1995, SRSL manufactures sugar, energy, ethanol and biofertilizers in an integrated plant in North Karnataka, India. With an able management and robust vision, Shree Renuka Sugars today is one of the fastest growing sugar manufacturers in the country. Shree Renuka Sugars is an integrated manufacturing company with strategic focus on Sugar and its allied products in Power and Ethanol. The Company's registered office is in Belgaum, Karnataka and Corporate Office is at Mumbai. Their key manufacturing facility is in Munoli, Athani & Havalgah, Karnataka and they also operate three leased facilities at Ajara & Arag in Maharashtra and at Aland in Karnataka. The current capacities of SRSL are as per the table below: Unit Cane(TCD) Cogeneration (MW) Distillery (KLPD) Refinery (TPD) Munoli, Karnataka 7,500 35.5 120 1,000 Athani, Karnataka 6,000 37 160 1,000 Havalgah, Karnataka 4,000 - - - Ajara, Maharashtra 2,500 - - - Arag, Maharashtra 4,000 - - - Aland, Karnataka 1,250 - - - Haldia, West Bengal - 15 - 2,000
  5. 5. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 5 Total 25,250 87.5 280 4,000 SRSL has the largest sugar refining capacity in India of 4000 tons per day (TPD), two 1000TPD each refineries integrated with its plants at Munoli and Athani and a 2000 TPD port based refinery coming up in Haldia SRSL has acquired a majority stake in KBK, an engineering company primarily engaged in providing turnkey solutions in the field of distilleries, Ethanol plants and bio- fuels. SRSL has also acquired a standalone distillery of 100 KLPD from Dhanuka Petrochem located at Khopoli, Maharashtra. The Company has set up a wholly owned subsidiary viz. Shree Renuka Biofuels Holdings FZE in Sharjah International Free Zone (SAIF Zone) for its overseas investments. Company History Shree Renuka Sugars Limited has been incorporated as a public limited company on 25th October 1995. MURKUMBI family of Belgaum with participation of over 4500+ farmer shareholders has promoted the company. It is an integrated manufacturing company with strategic focus on Sugar and its allied products in Power and Ethanol. The Company's registered office is in Belgaum, Karnataka and Corporate Office is at Mumbai. Its key manufacturing facility is in Munoli, 70 Kms from Belgaum and also operates a leased facility at Ajara, Maharashtra. The company is working on other acquisitions, expansions and lease opportunities to strengthen its existing strong fundamentals and growth prospects. Shree Renuka Sugars initially acquired a sick sugar mill with a capacity of 1,250 TCD of Nizam Sugars Limited, a Government of Andhra Pradesh undertaking, situated in Hindapur in Andhra Pradesh. This unit's asset base was moved to its own location in Munoli and expanded its capacity to 2500 TCD with 11.2 MW cogeneration plant. The commissioning and trial production took place in November 1999. A distillery and ethanol plant of 60kl per day capacity was added in 2002. The sugar refinery was set up to process raw sugar to produce refined sugar meeting European specifications.
  6. 6. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 6 Shree Renuka Sugars is operating on lease a co-operative facility in Ajara, South Maharastra which is a 2500 TCD plant. Further the company is operating on lease a co-operative facility in Mohan nagar in Sangli district of Maharashtra, which has a capacity of 4000 TCD. In fiscal 2002, they ventured into manufacture of ethanol by setting up a distillery with a capacity of 60 KLPD at the Munoli unit. In 2003, we set up a refinery to process raw sugar with a processing capacity of 250 TPD at Munoli and subsequently increased to 1,000 TPD. In 2004, the Company acquired on lease, a loss-making co-operative sugar mill in Ajara, Maharashtra with a manufacturing capacity of 2,500 TCD and added another lease facility of 2,500 TCD in Arag, Maharashtra and subsequently which got commissioned in the ongoing crushing season and Arag Plant was further expanded to 4,000 TCD in 2006. In 2005, the Company has acquired M/s. Haripriya Sugars, a green-field project at Athani with land and licenses and successfully commissioned 6,000 TCD plant in March, 2007 with co- generation facility of 37 MW and distillery of 120 KLPD. During the same period they have also acquired a sick sugar mill in Sindhkheda, Dhule, Maharashtra of 2500 TCD from Sitson India Private Limited which was dismantled and relocated & expanded to 4,000 TCD at Havalga, Afzalpur, Karnataka. The Company acquired another lease unit, a loss-making co-operative sugar mill in Aland, Karnataka with a 1,250 TCD plant. The crushing capacity of Munoli plant increased to 7,500 TCD along with an additional co-generation capacity of 15 MW and additional Ethanol capacity of 60 KL. The current manufacturing capacity of Sugar, Power and Ethanol is 25,250 TCD, 87.5 MW and 280 KLPD respectively at various locations in the state of Karnataka, Maharashtra and West Bengal. The refining capacity of raw sugar is 4,000 TPD at Munoli, Athani and Haldia. The Company’s merchant export division is the second largest sugar exporter out of India. The Company has built a capability in sugar trade business and incorporated an overseas subsidiary, Renuka Commodities DMCC in Dubai.This fiscal it is the largest raw sugar importer into India. The Company manufactured and traded over 250,000 MT of sugar in 2002-03 and
  7. 7. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 7 350,000 MT in 2004-05. Total trade flow puts the Company in the top 10 of sugar producers/marketers in India. In the first year of incorporation (FY05), Renuka Commodities DMCC posted a profit of Rs.153 million and achieved a turnover of Rs.1,562 million. The company came out with an Initial Public Offer (IPO) at an issue price of Rs.285/- per share aggregating to Rs.1,100 million. The Company was listed with NSE and BSE on October 31, 2005 at 9% premium to the issue price. The Company has nearly 9,000 farmers as its shareholders. These farmers were allotted these equity shares of 500 shares each at par during the initial stage of implementation of operations of the Company. The company offered its shares to Qualified Institutional Placement through Motilal Oswal Investments in August 2007 at an issue price of Rs.750/- per share aggregating to Rs.1,640 million. Company Vision “To become the most efficient processor of sugar and the largest marketer of sugar and ethanol in the country.” Company Mission Shree Renuka Sugars Ltd aims to become the most efficient and market driven integrated processor of sugarcane in the world, while enabling the team to grow in learning and motivating atmosphere, participating in the all round development of the community and delivering consistently on returns to all the shareholders
  8. 8. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 8 Business Segments Company’s business operation can be segregated into four divisions are as below: � Sugar Milling Division � Ethanol Division � Power Division � Sugar Refining Division SRSL PRODUCTS SRSL are one of the few fully integrated sugar companies, which have capabilities to extract maximum value from sugarcane. Sugar is the primary product of sugarcane. However, sugarcane crushing yields by-products like molasses that are used in facilities for the generation of power and production of ethanol and fuel ethanol. Sugar Renuka Sugars produces EC II grade refined sugar which confirms to EU norms (Less than 45 ICUMSA). SRS uses phosphorisation process which produces sulphur less sugar. It is considered a higher end product mostly used for direct consumption in European and African countries as well by corporates for Industrial usage.
  9. 9. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 9 SRSL has two integrated refineries each at the Munoli and the Athani Plant. It is also in the last stages of commissioning a stand alone refinery at Haldia, West Bengal. This reinforces the focus on value and products and an export oriented outlook. Ethanol SRSL produces alcohol from the molasses (Molasses is the brown coloured residue after sugar has been extracted from the juice. Molasses still contains some quantity of sugar, but this sugar cannot be extracted by usual technology) left after the extraction of sugarcane juice, which can be used both for potable purpose as well as an Industrial chemical. Further this alcohol can be again purified to produce fuel grade ethanol that can be blended with petrol. Power In the process of crushing of sugar cane, Bagasse, a fibrous by-product is produced which is used in the boilers to generate steam. We produce power from bagasse, which is used in the manufacturing process as well as sold to the state electricity boards. Further this bagasse based cogeneration plant is eligible for carbon credit compensation under the Kyoto protocol. Bio-Fertilizers The residue product from distillery operations blended with chemicals is being sold as bio- fertilizers
  10. 10. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 10 Elements of Growth Strategy of Shree Renuka Sugars Limited  Large Expansion of Installed Capacity  End to End Integration of all Plants  Quick Scale-up of capacity by leasing  TRADE-FLOW: Synergy of trading and manufacturing  Reduce Price risk by Hedging  Capitalize on Changes in the World market  New Ideas in Old Business
  11. 11. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 11 Organizational Chart of SRSL Chairperson M.D. Dir. comm CFOPresident ED1GM Sales ED2 Mgr Sales Dy mgr Sales Sr.Godown Keeper G.D K HR Asst mgr comm Co. Sec DGM GM Mgr A/c Sr Ac off. Dy Mgr Ac off. GM cane Dept Dy cane Mgr Cane supplier Asst.cane off. Cane off. C. E. Eng C. Chem C. Eng GM 3GM1 C.Eng C.Chem C.E.Eng GM2 C.Eng C.Chem C.E.Eng GM cane Dept Dy cane Mgr Cane supplier Asst.cane off. Cane off. GM5 Distillery Lab I/C C. Chem Mgr. Dist GM4 C. Eng C.Chem C. Eng GM3 C. Eng C.Chem C. Eng GM2 C. Eng C.Chem C. Eng GM1 C. Eng C.Chem C. Eng
  12. 12. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 12 INDIAN SUGAR INDUSTRY Domestic Scenario India is the largest consumer and second largest producer of sugar in the world (Sthece: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service). In SY 2006/07 India produced 28.5 mln tons and consumed 20 mln tons of sugar. India has exported around 1.5 mln tons of sugar after the ban on sugar exports was lifted in January, 2007. With an opening stock of 4 mln tons in 2005-06, India will end the year with stocks of more than 11 mln tons. The following table shows the supply demand balances since 2000. India has swung itself from a net importer to a potentially big exporter in a matter of 2 years. This shows the cyclicity of the Sugar industry in India. The Indian sugar industry is the second largest agro-industry located in the rural India. The Indian sugar industry has a turnover of Rs. 700 billion per annum and it contributes almost Rs. 22.5 billion to the central and state exchequer as tax, cess, and excise duty every year (Sthece: Ministry of Food, Government of India). It is the second largest agro-processing industry in the country after cotton textiles. With more than 600 operating sugar mills in different parts of the country, Indian sugar industry has been a focal point for socio-economic development in the rural areas. About 50 million sugarcane farmers and a large number of agricultural labtheers are involved in sugarcane cultivation and ancillary activities, constituting 7.5% of the rural population. Besides,
  13. 13. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 13 the industry provides employment to about 2 million skilled/semi skilled workers and others mostly from the rural areas. (Sthece: ISMA) Production In 2006/07, India produced 28.5 mn tons of sugar. UP and Maharashtra together contributed more than 67% to the total production. Maharashtra overtaking UP became the largest producer of sugar. Maharashtra’s production increased from 5.9 mn tons to 9.6 mn tons this year. Higher yields and greater cane acreage contributed to this increase. Following table shows region wise distribution of production. Current Industry Status In 2005/06, there were 581 installed sugar mills in the country with a production capacity of 190 lakh MTs of sugar, of which only 455 are working. These mills are located in 18 states of the country. Around 312 of the total installed mills are in the cooperative sector, 205 in the private sector and 64 in the public sector (Sthece: Directorate of Sugar). The no. of factories in the private sector has increased by more than 15% which shows the corporatization of sugar production. But majority of the industry is still fragmented with more than 50% of the industry represented by the co operatives. Maharashtra has been the most enterprising of the states in starting new factories which increased from 102 in 2004/05 to 142 in 2005/06.
  14. 14. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 14 Sugarcane Availability Sugarcane occupies about 4.2% of the total kharif area under cultivated area and it is one of the most important cash crops in the country. The area under sugarcane has gradually increased from 2.7 million hectares in 1980-’81 to 4.3 million hectares in 2005-06, mainly because of much larger diversion of land from other crops to sugarcane by the farmers for economic reasons. From a level of 154 MMT in 1980-1981, the sugarcane production increased to 241 MMT in 1990-1991 and further to 297 MMT in 2006-2007 (Sugar India Yearbook).
  15. 15. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 15 Sthece: ICRA sugar sector analysis Production Mix Most of the mills in India are not equipped to make refined sugar. Mills which are designed to produce refined sugar can manufacture sugar not only from sugarcane but also from raw sugar which can be imported. Therefore, such mills can run their production all the year round, as opposed to single stage mills which are dependent upon the seasonal supply of sugarcane Due to good demand and bulk requirement, a lot of millers have shown interest in producing Raw Sugar this year. It is to be seen if this latent demand can be converted into an opportunity and India can establish itself as a bulk exporter of Raw Sugar. Global Sugar Scenario Supply and Demand During the 2006/07 crop cycle, production exceeded consumption by over 10 mln tons. Global cane sugar production shot up to 131 mln tons from 110 mln tons in 2005/06, a jump of 19%. World sugar production totaled 162.6 mln tons, balance contributed by Beet Sugar. Global consumption grew by 5.3 mln tons to 152.4 mln tons. The year on year consumption growth
  16. 16. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 16 increased to 3.5% from 1.8% in 2005/06. 2006/07 saw a major swing from deficit to surplus, with much of the growth in production coming from the Asian countries, especially India which turned into an exporter in January, 2007 and has thus swung the world sugar balances in the other direction. Major Sugar Producers India and Brazil continue to dominate the global sugar production followed by China, Thailand Mexico and Australia. In SY 2006-07 India and Brazil together contributed more than 60 mln MT out the total 131 mln MT of sugar produced from cane. Top ten countries produced more than 80% of the total production. World Sugar Consumption Currently 69% of the world’s sugar is consumed in the country of origin whilst the balance is traded on world markets. India is the largest consumer of sugar and consumption has grown faster in Asia than across the world. Long-term potential for consumption growth, particularly in
  17. 17. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 17 Southern African countries, remains positive. Consumption growth in China has increased as a result of the buoyant economic conditions currently being experienced in that country. 2007/08 Estimates According to the International Sugar Organization (ISO) said that 2007-2008 sugar production would reach 165.6 million tons, up 3 million tons on the year. It also said the 2007-2008 surpluses would be around 10.8 million tons. World consumption is projected at 156.8 million tons, up 2.3% from 2006- 2007. The ISO also predicted that India would become the world’s largest sugar producer in 2007-2008, replacing Brazil. They forecast India’s production at a record 33.15 million tons, up 2.55 million tons on the year. World Sugar Prices
  18. 18. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 18 Higher world market prices during the past two years provided the incentive amongst sugar producers worldwide to expand their cane and beet sugar crops. The resultant increased sugar availability has served to dampen world market prices which have fallen from US20 cents/lb in February 2006 to less than 9.5 US cents/lb at the end of July 2007. Globally sugar is standardized as either raw sugar, which is traded on the NYBOT or Refined Sugar traded on the LIFFE exchange, London. There are a lot of other regional exchanges in Major producing countries like Brazil and India, but liquidity and participation remains dominant in the NYBOT and the LIFFE.
  19. 19. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 19 Recent Developments Preferential prices in the EU and US remain at a significant premium to the world sugar price. In terms of the EU Sugar Regime reform, a uniform price is now being paid for ACP (African, Caribbean and Pacific) and EBA (Everything But Arms) sugar protocol exports. The EU sugar regime has changed from the year 2006/07 with most of the preferential quota being abolished by the April 2005 WTO ruling. This created a glut of refined sugar globally in March – May 2007 leading the prices rally to more than 400$ per tonne A lot of standalone refineries have been announced to fill the gap left by the exit of the European Sugar which have again depressed the world refined sugar prices to the lows of 270$ per tonne in August 2007. Going forward India is going to play a very crucial role in World Sugar Trade. Policy decisions and Production figures in India would have substantial impact on the world sugar prices.
  20. 20. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 20 Competitive Strengths The Company believes that we have distinct and different competitive strengths in the businesses. 1. Shree Renuka Sugars Ltd. is fully integrated player As opposed to a conventional sugar mill, where the primary product is sugar and the by-products, bagasse and molasses are sold to third parties, an integrated sugar mill is able to extract the maximum value out of sugarcane by being able to produce value added products like Ethanol, Power, and Bio fertilizers from molasses, bagasse and press mud respectively. The Company is able to process sugarcane into all three co – products i.e. Sugar, power and ethanol. Further, the Company’s integrated distillery provides several advantages such as - a. They need not have to sell molasses to third parties b. Ready power and steam is available for ethanol from the co-generation plant c. A number of sugar mills in the region do not have attached distilleries. This enables the Company to have access and buy molasses as and when required. 2. Reduced impact of seasonality by processing of raw sugar The manufacturing processes at Munoli and Athani facilities are designed as such that can produce sugar not only from sugarcane but also from raw sugar. The uniqueness of the Company’s business model is that its operations can run on two feed stocks - sugarcane and/or raw sugar. The Company, in the intermediate stage, extracts raw sugar from cane and then processes this intermediate raw sugar into refined white sugar. In the off-crushing season, the Company runs the second intermediate process, producing refined white sugar on a raw sugar feed. The benefits of such dual feeding are Multi- pronged - a. Greater fixed asset utilization and distribution of fixed overheads; and b. Reduced impact of seasonality of the sugarcane crops. c. Higher level of operations.
  21. 21. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 21 SRSL is one of the few mills in the country to leverage double feed operations. 3. Superior utilization of fixed assets SRSL achieve higher capacity utilization and asset turnover as compared to industry due to longer operating season in the region, higher sugar content in available cane, and dual raw material capability. All India average for duration of crushing was 96 days in SY 2005 and 126 days in SY 2006 [Source: Indian Sugar, Vol. LVII, July 2007]. They were able to operate the factory for a longer period. We operated the mills for 208 days in SY 2004, 329 days (including sugar refining) in SY 2005 and 230 days in SY 2006. During the nine months ended June 30, 2007, we have already operated for 269 days (including sugar refining). 4. Access to superior technology for refining of sugar SRSL have a tie-up for technical expertise in refining operations with Tate & Lyle Industries Pte of UK, which is a GBP 4.07 billion company and one of Europe’s largest sugar refiner. The sugar refinery was set up with technical assistance from Tate & Lyle Industries Pte of UK. We have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with Tate & Lyle Industries Pte of UK, whereby they will render technical assistance on an ongoing basis for further development of refining capability and development of value-added products. 5. Company sales are focused towards corporate and industrial buyers Sugar traditionally was sold in the wholesale market to agents and dealers. SRSL believes in marketing sugar directly to corporate and industrial buyers to capture a larger market share. Dealing with corporate and industrial buyers has several benefits like: � Scope to fix prices in advance and reduce price risk; � Reduced working capital cost due to increased comfort for working capital lenders; and � Reduced dependence on brokers for sale of sugar.
  22. 22. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 22 SRSL supplies sugar to multinational companies who manufacture carbonated soft drinks, fruit juices, chocolates, baby food and dairy products. Corporate sales constituted 20% of the gross sugar sales Some of their key corporate buyers of sugar are Hindustan Coca Cola Beverages Private Limited, PepsiCo, ITC Ltd, Britannia Industries Limited, Nestle’ India Limited, Cadbury India Limited, to name a few. 6. Prominent trading presence in India’s international sugar trade The Company is active in international trading of sugar from India. The exported 558,297 MT of sugar between 2002-2007 and are ranked 2nd (Source: Indian Sugar Mills Association)in terms of overall exports of Indian sugar in terms of quantity. They have imported 381,458 MT of raw sugar between 2002-2007. Their wholly owned subsidiary, Renuka Commodities DMCC is active in third country trade of sugar, which gives them a continuous presence in India’s key export markets. The Company has also been awarded a 2 star export house status by the Director General of Foreign Trade (DGFT), Government of India. Trading in sugar gives the Company an enhanced trade flow much larger than its own manufactured sugar. This translates into a deeper and wider exposure to price trends and customer buying patterns in both domestic and international sugar markets. 7. Locational Advantage Another strong positive for the Company is the advantage of being located in south India. Sugar companies in south India are inherently at an advantage over northern India mills as: a. They have a longer crushing season. b. The market for co-generated power has matured in these States with proven stability in off take and payments from the electricity distribution companies. c. The Company, located in south India, are closer to ports and that opens up a cost-effective option of extending sugar-producing capacity through the raw sugar-refining route. d. They operate in a free market compared to north Indian sugar mills. Moreover, they operate in the “high recovery area” of southwest India, where sucrose content of cane is 10%-20% more than elsewhere in the country. South Indian mills have far higher yields as
  23. 23. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 23 compared to the north Indian belt of Haryana and Uttar Pradesh. This is due to a far longer crushing season for south Indian mills and also higher sucrose content in cane crushed in southwest India. The Company plants are located close to the ports of Goa and Karwar (approximately 160 km. and 200 km. respectively). The average door-to-door shipment is less than 24 hthes, compared to around 3-4 days for a north Indian mill. Transport costs for a near-coast mill like this Company are about Rs.500–Rs.600/ MT of sugar versus a north India based mill, for which it costs around Rs.1,000–Rs.1,200/ MT. This translates to a cost ratio of around 1:2. 8. Excellent relationship with sugarcane farmers. SRSL believe that they have excellent relationship with sugar cane farmers. As shareholders, the farmers enjoy benefits of sharing profits of the Company. They also make sure that payments to sugarcane farmers are made in a timely manner. They have formed a trust, Shree Renuka Sugars Development Foundation, which mainly focuses on promotion of education, healthcare and overall betterment of the farmers and the local community. They believe this strong relationship is a significant competitive advantage because farmers have no obligation to grow sugarcane and may switch to crops that may be more profitable. They also coordinate and manage the harvesting and transportation of cane, which saves the farmers effort, time and money. This also enables them to get fresh and mature sugarcane, which increases the yield of sugar. 9. An elaborate sugarcane collection network. In order to carry out cane development and cane procurement activities effectively and smoothly, they have a dedicated cane department to control and supervise the cane development and procurement activities. They purchase sugarcane directly from the farmers without involvement of any intermediaries. Based on the age of the crop, variety and maturity, a harvesting program is chalked out for desired quantity and quality of cane to be procured on a day-to-day basis. The Cane Managers issue cutting orders / harvesting permits based on date-wise cum pre-harvesting maturity survey. Accordingly cane transporting vehicles along with harvesting groups are allotted for harvesting and transporting cane to the mill.
  24. 24. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 24 10. Committed and experienced management team Mr. Narendra Murkumbi, Managing Director is a post graduate from IIM Ahmedabad and was inducted on the Board of ICICI Bank Limited in recognition of his expertise and involvement in the sugar industry in India. This is reflected in the way the management is planning the future growth and taking advantage of the improving dynamics of the sugar industry. Since inception the Company has gone about in a systematic manner to increase the manufacturing capacities to gain advantages of economies of scale. Mr. Murkumbi pioneered the strategy of acquiring and putting to use leased assets for sugar manufacturing from the loss making co-operative mills at very low costs. This helped the Company to scale up the operations within a short span of time. 11. Human resources They have a highly qualified and well-trained workforce of 1,233 employees as at September 30, 2007. This includes over 650 technically qualified workforce which constitute 53% of the workforce. They believe that we are one of the few sugar companies in India to have in place an employee stock option plan (“ESOP”) which rewards the performance of the employees. 12. Prudent management of financial resources SRSL believe that the optimal utilization of financial and other resources is a key element for achieving success in this industry. Their strategy is to focus on the capital utilization and structure, so as to optimize their returns. They also actively engage in the analysis and identification of sugar mills which they believe would maximize the returns, and accord priority to such mills. They have implemented internal reporting systems that enable them to carefully monitor cash flows regularly. Their aim is to not overextend the financial resources in any single project, while at the same time assisting adequate cash flow to be generated to enable work progress. They are endeavoring to minimize the cost of capital through regular reviews of capital requirements, as well as periodic renegotiation of the terms of debt. 13. We operate integrated ethanol facilities Integrated ethanol facilities provides them with several advantages like:
  25. 25. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 25 • Able to add value to molasses produced from the plants, and need not sell any molasses to third parties • Cheap power and steam is available for the distillery from the co-generation plant • Effluent (spent-wash) can be processed with press mud into bio-fertilizers and compost • A number of sugar mills in the region do not have attached distilleries. This enables us to buy molasses, if required 14. The Company has a fuel ethanol plants attached to the distillery They are one of the few distilleries, which are equipped to manufacture fuel ethanol from ethanol. Fuel ethanol is gaining momentum due to rising oil prices. The GoI is encouraging the use of fuel ethanol as a motor fuel since it is considered to be less polluting and also a renewable source of energy (since it is sourced from an agricultural product, which can be re-grown). Subject to fulfillment of certain conditions, GoI has mandated blending of 5% ethanol in petrol across the country except North East, Jammu & Kashmir and Island territories. They supply fuel ethanol to various oil companies such as IOCL, HPCL and BPCL for blending in petrol. 15. Government policy encourages co-generation. The Government of India has prescribed that a certain percentage of energy from alternative sources has to be purchased by distribution companies and has also allowed open access, which will enable us to sell power to third parties also. The electricity regulatory commissions of Maharashtra and Karnataka have also prescribed preferential tariffs for electricity produced from renewable energy sources including cogeneration.
  26. 26. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 26 Company’s Strategy The corporate vision is to be the most efficient processor of sugarcane and the largest marketer of sugar and ethanol in the country. The strategies for meeting these objectives are as follows: 1. Bio-fuels strategy: To consolidate its leadership position in the fuel-ethanol market, we have taken the following steps: i. Consolidate leadership in Fuel ethanol market – They are the market leaders in the fuel-ethanol market in India. During the tenders which were brought out by the oil marketing companies (OMCs) for the blending 5% ethanol with petrol, they were able to garner 20% market share in the process. This meant that they would be supplying 217 million litres of ethanol to the OMCs over a period of 3 years at a fixed price of Rs.21.50 per litre. They intend to consolidate the leadership position in the fuel-ethanol market, when the blending increases to 10%, which the government is planning to introduce shortly. As part of this plan, SRS have also announced new capex which would take the production capacity to 900 KLPD from 450 KLPD over the next two years. ii. Acquisition of ethanol manufacturing assets to cater fuel ethanol market: SRSL have acquired a stand-alone ethanol plant with a capacity of 100 KLPD which could be expanded to 300 KLPD. This will help the Company in cutting down transportation costs for supply of Ethanol contracts to the Oil Marketing Companies (OMC) located in coastal States of Goa, Karnataka and Kerala and for export purpose. They have firm orders from Oil Marketing Companies for supply of ethanol over the next 3 years. They intend to increase the manufacturing capacity of ethanol from 100 KLPD to 300 KLPD, to cater to the fuel ethanol market in southern States of India..
  27. 27. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 27 iii. Acquisition of ethanol EPC & equipment manufacturing capability – SRS have acquired 54% stake of KBK Chem-Engineering Pvt. Ltd. (KBK) for a consideration of Rs 400 million. KBK is an engineering Company, primarily engaged in providing turnkey solutions (EPC Contracts) in the field of Distilleries, Ethanol plants and Bio-fuels and about 50% of its revenues are from overseas projects. This acquisition provides a platform for leading the innovation into flexi production, new feed stocks and cellulosic processes. It also enables to undertake Research & Development on design and development of process technology. iv. Overseas acquisitions and investments: SRS are also evaluating potential overseas acquisitions and investments in the Biofuels space to take advantage of the fast growing global Biofuels market. There is a global interest in Biofuel blending programme and the company intends to have its presence in the international market. 2. Expand the installed capacity for an increased market presence: SRS intends to enhance the manufacturing capacity of ethanol from 450 KLPD to 900 KLPD and power generation capacity from 103.5 MW to 129 MW with an exportable surplus of 70 MW. This expansion will help us to leverage the capacities for the increased blending programmes announced by the Government of India and to be an active power trading player. 3. To set up a state- of- art refinery capacity SRS intends to set up a state-of-the-art manufacturing capacity of 2,000 TPD port-based refineries in Haldia, West Bengal. This refinery would use raw sugar and convert it into European grade sugar which fetches a 30 premium in the world market. This refinery is strategically placed for
  28. 28. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 28 servicing domestic and export markets and can operate round the year on combination of domestic and imported raw material. The facility has capacity to process up to 700,000 Tons of sugar per year. They have a refinery of 1,000 TPD capacity at the existing plant in Munoli, Karnataka and has been operating the same for the last three years. Now, we intend to set up refineries of 1,000 TPD capacity at Athani and 2000 TDP at Haldia. These refineries would also be able to produce European grade sugar. 4. Achieve greater raw material security. SRS pursues cane development initiatives and facilitate crop loans to increase cane production in the reserve area. Acquisitions / leasing of other sugar mills allow them to cover more cane areas. They provide quality seeds, other agri-inputs, fertilizer subsidies to farmers. They have taken steps to educate the farmers about the economics of growing cane as compared to other crops. They also have taken initiatives for development of irrigation sources as well as taking up land development to bring additional acreage under cultivation, which is either barren or unsuitable for growing cane. 5. To reduce price risk in sugar by hedging SRS intends to use the large trade flow, which consists of the sales of manufactured and traded sugar to manage price risk. They have membership at the National Commodities and Derivatives Exchange (NCDEX). They will actively utilize NCDEX and international commodity exchanges to fix the prices of sugar for forward sales. The percentage of forward cover is decided by their internal risk management team and is driven by their perception of trends in the market. This hedging strategy provides them with protection to the price volatility in commodity market and stable revenue flows. 6. Maintain a strong presence in the export markets SRSL is one of the largest exporter of sugar in India. They have exported 46% of their sugar during the nine months ended June 30, 2007. They intend to be a prominent supplier of high
  29. 29. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 29 quality European grade sugar within Asia where they will be in a position to supply not only the in-house manufactured sugar but also traded sugar. 7. Entitlement to carbon credits in the Cogeneration plant Bagasse based cogeneration plant at Munoli has qualified as a Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project which entitles us to generate Carbon Credits under KYOTO protocol. This project will be eligible for Carbon Credits based on the units of power sold from the Munoli co-generation plant. They have also applied for the other projects at Athani and Havalga to be eligible as a CDM project and are expecting toreceive the eligibility certificates soon, which would help them to sell/trade carbon credits from all the units on an ongoing basis. Recent Developments in the Company During the last nine months the following proposals were approved and informed to the Exchange: • The Company has contracted to supply 217.32 million litres of Ethanol to the Oil Marketing Companies (IOC, HPCL & BPCL) for a period of three years upto October, 2009. They have a 20% share of the total tendered quantity of 1061 million litres making us the market leaders in India. • Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter XIII of the SEBI Guidelines, they have issued and allotted 1,000,000 convertible warrants of Rs.10 each to Shree Renuka Sugar Development Foundation, Shree Renuka Sugar Employees Welfare Trust and Murkumbi Industries Private Limited on
  30. 30. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 30 September 7, 2007. These warrants can be exercised within a period of 18 months from the date of the issue at a price of Rs. 625. 71/- per Equity Share • The "Compensation Committee" of the Board of Directors has approved, by circulation on 28th June, 2007, grant of 2,38,000 Stock Options to the employees/Directors under the ESOS -2006. The price per share to be allotted on exercise of Options is Rs.591 Vesting of option is as under :- (1) 50% of the options granted to the employees shall vest on 28th June, 2010. (2) 50% of the options granted to the employees shall vest on 28th March, 2012. The options shall be exercised within three years from the date of vesting or Five years from the date of granting, whichever is later. • The Company has acquired a 54% stake in KBK, an engineering company primarily engaged in providing turnkey solutions in the field of distilleries, Ethanol plants and bio-fuels. The above acquisition was made for a consideration of Rs.400 Mn • The Company has set up a wholly owned subsidiary viz. Shree Renuka Biofuels Holdings FZE in Sharjah International Free Zone (SAIF Zone) for its overseas investments". Expansion Phase 1: 1. In the current year SRS have expanded the cane crushing capacity at their plant in Munoli, Karnataka to 7500 TCD and the cogeneration capacity to 35.5 MW. 2. They have commissioned a 4000 TCD plant at Havalgah, Karnataka. 3. They have enhanced the crushing capacity at the leased facility at Arag, Maharashtra from 2500 TCD to 4000 TCD. 4. The company has completed a green-field plant and commenced crushing operations at Athani, Karnataka. The plant has a capacity of 6000 TCD and a cogeneration capacity of 38 MW.
  31. 31. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 31 5. They have built a 2000 TPD port based refinery at Haldia, West Bengal which will be operational in sugar year 2007 -08. 6. They have taken on lease a sugar manufacturing unit having a capacity of 1250 TCD of Aland Sahakari Sakkare Karkhane (N), District Gulbarga Karnataka State, for a period of seven years starting from sugar season 2005-06 to 2011-12.Thus their Sugar manufacturing capacity has increased to 25250 TCD, Ethanol capacity has increased to 450 KLPD and their Co-generation capacity to 87.5 MW as of September 30, 2007. This capacity expansion required a total capex of Rs. 7,010 million. Expansion Phase 2: In the second phase the co-generation capacity would be increased to 129 MW and the distillery capacity to 900 KLPD by 2009. Some of the key developments for fiscal year 2006 were: ERP Implementation: We successfully implemented My SAP- ERP for seamless integration of data from different locations and from cross functional areas of financial, sales, production etc., providing strong foundation for an open and transparent work environment and also providing solid foundation for organized system of information, integration and knowledge management and CDM Project: they became the first bagasse based cogeneration mill in the world to be registered as a clean development mechanism (CDM) project. Government Norms in Indian Sugar Industry Sugar is a regulated industry in India sugar is an essential commodity, and is covered by the Essential Commodities Act, 1955 and consequently, its production supply and distribution are regulated by the state and central government. The Cane Commissioner of each state reserves and assigns areas for the supply of sugarcane to factories on an equitable basis.
  32. 32. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 32 The purchase price of sugarcane is regulated and the central government fixes the SMP, which must mandatorily be paid by sugar producers to sugarcane growers, within a specified time. The Government of India, through the Sugar Directorate, can further fix the quantity and quality of sugar that may be produced by a factory during any year and can also regulate the sale of sugar. Sugar mills must sell a specified percentage of sugar (free sale sugar), which is currently at 90 per cent of their production in the open market and are therefore subject to the forces of demand and supply. However, the quantity of free sale sugar to be sold is based on the release mechanism governed by the Sugar Directorate. 10% Levy sugar must be sold as per government directions through fair price shops and the public distribution system at government notified prices, which may be set below the cost of production, however exports are not subject to this release mechanism as stated above. Various taxes and levies are also imposed on the purchase, use, consumption and sale of sugarcane. Any change in government policies or present regulations to the detriment may adversely affect the business, financial condition and results of operations. Under the Sugarcane (Control) Order 1966, the Government of India fixes the Statutory Minimum Price (“SMP”) for sugarcane each year based on the recommendations of the Commission on Agricultural Costs and Prices, which takes into account factors such as the cost of cultivation, return to factories and average recovery for previous year. The SMP is fixed for a given base level of recovery and is the minimum price that is required to pay the farmers from whom we purchase cane. A portion of the sugar manufactured by sugar companies is bought by the Government of India as “levy sugar” at a price that is fixed by the Government of India. The remaining sugar is known as “free sale sugar” and is sold at a price that is determined by market factors such as availability. The free sale sugar prices are also controlled to some extent by the monthly release mechanism (“MRM”), which is dependent on demand and supply of sugar. RISK FACTORS Risks relating to the Company
  33. 33. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 33 SRSL operating results may fluctuate in the future due to a number of factors, some of which are beyond their control. Their results of operations during any fiscal year and from period to period are difficult to predict as sugar business, results of operations and financial condition may be materially affected by: • Changes in demand for sugar and sugar-related products in the Indian and global markets; • Shifting consumer preferences away from certain sweeteners and brands towards other certain types; • A decrease in international and domestic prices for sugars products; • An increase in interest rates at which Company raise debt financing; • Adverse fluctuations in the exchange rate of the Rupee versus major international currencies, including the US dollar will affect company’s results if SRSL become a regular exporter; • A decrease in Indian import tariffs and an increase in domestic duties on sugar and sugar-related products; • Increasing transportation costs, including freight to key export markets, or non-availability of transportation due to strikes, shortages or for any other reason; • Strikes or work stoppages by company’s employees; • Equipment failure; • Failure to comply with applicable regulations and standards and to maintain necessary licenses and changes to government environmental policies and regulations; • Changes in government policies affecting sugar industries for raw materials and the amount of sugar it must sell in India; • Other changes in government policies, including those relating to alcohol and power distribution, pricing and taxation; Risks relating to sugar business of Shree Renuka Sugars Limited
  34. 34. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 34 1) Sugarcane is the principal raw material used for the production of raw sugar. SRSL business depends on the availability of sugarcane and any shortage of sugarcane may adversely affect company’s results of operations. A variety of factors beyond the control may contribute to a shortage of sugarcane in any given crushing season. 2) Company’s profitability depends significantly on the cost of and the selling price that we are able to obtain for sugar. Sugar industries are not able to set the cost of sugarcane or the selling price for sugar product. Some of the main reasons that contribute to fluctuations in the margin between raw material cost and the selling price of sugar are set forth below. Under the Sugarcane (Control) Order 1966, the Government of India fixes the Statutory Minimum Price (“SMP”) for sugarcane each year based on the recommendations of the Commission on Agricultural Costs and Prices, which takes into account factors such as the cost of cultivation, return to factories and average recovery for previous year. SRSL may be adversely affected if the Government of India raises the SMP, which in turn would affect the actual price paid. Such a situation may worsen in the event of a decrease in the selling price of sugar. A portion of the sugar manufactured by us is bought by the Government of India as “levy sugar” at a price that is fixed by the Government of India. The remaining sugar is known as “free sale sugar” and is sold at a price that is determined by market factors such as availability. The free sale sugar prices are also controlled to some extent by the monthly release mechanism (“MRM”), which is dependent on demand and supply of sugar. On the last day of every month the Company receives a release order indicating the quantity of sugar sold for the next month. We may be adversely affected if free sale sugar prices decline. 3) SRSL operate in an industry where the market price for their products is cyclical and affected by general economic conditions.
  35. 35. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 35 The sugar industry has historically been subject to commodity cycles and is sensitive to changes in domestic market prices, supply and demand. The market in India has experienced periods of limited supply, causing sugar prices and industry profit margins to increase. Sugar imports are governed by the Government of India’s policy, which currently applies a 60 per cent customs duty and other import tariffs on imported white crystal sugar. India is a member of the World Trade Organization, which, under the framework of GATT, is likely to reduce tariff and non-tariff barriers. If the Government of India creates incentives for sugar imports or reduces import tariffs, they may face increased competition in the domestic market from foreign producers. This could lead to increased competition from imported sugar and could cause a reduction in domestic sugar prices which may lead to lower profits for us in the future. Conversely, years of low production and declining sugar stocks may be followed by years of excess production that result in oversupply of sugar to the domestic market, causing a decline in sugar prices and industry profit margins. At present the Indian sugar industry is facing an oversupply situation, bolstered by excess production capacity being available, which has resulted in a nearly 25 per cent decline in sugar prices from September, 2006 to June 2007. 4) The prices they are able to obtain for the sugar that we produce depend largely on prevailing market prices. The wholesale price of sugar has a significant impact on company’s profits. Sugar is subject to price fluctuations resulting from weather, natural disasters, domestic and foreign trade policies, shifts in supply and demand and other factors beyond their control. In addition, approximately 30 per cent. of total worldwide sugar production is traded on futures exchanges and is thus subject to speculation, which could affect the price of sugar worldwide and the results of operations. As a result, any prolonged decrease in sugar prices could have a material adverse effect on company’s results of operations. 5) Rising inventory levels are likely to keep sugar prices depressed and thereby affect the results of SRSL operation
  36. 36. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 36 The closing stock of sugar for FY2004, FY2005, FY2006, and FY2007 was 8.5 million tons, 4.7 million tons, 4.4 million tons and 10.9 million tons respectively. Even assuming that the sugar companies would move towards direct ethanol production, the closing stock of sugar for FY2008 and FY2009 is expected to be 13.4 million tons and 8.6 million tons respectively. Source:ISMA and Citi .As such, rising inventory levels are likely to keep sugar prices depressed thereby affecting the results of their operations. 6) SRSL is substantially dependent on the revenues from sugar. Company is substantially dependent on revenues from sugar and any decline in their revenues from sugar will adversely impact SRSL profit margins .Although company’s strategy is to actively grow their other lines of business , their sugar business will continue to constitute a significant portion of revenues and operating profit and any decline in the sugar revenues will adversely affect the results of srsl operations.
  37. 37. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 37 Other Risks 1) Inability to manage company’s growth could disrupt their business and reduce the profitability. As part of company’s business strategy, they are rapidly expanding their operations by enhancing the existing sugar refining capacity, cogeneration and bio-fuel production capacity and distillery capacity. SRSL is also proposing to acquire and lease more sugar plants. SRSL has experienced high growth in recent years, averaging a consolidated compound annual growth rate (“CAGR”) of 121 percent over the past three years and expect their business to grow significantly as a result of their capacity expansion plans and increased focus on bio-fuel production. SRSL expect this growth to place significant demands on company and require them to continuously evolve and improve in the operational, financial and internal controls. Any inability to manage this growth may have an adverse effect on the business and financial results. 2) SRSL derive a significant portion of their revenues from large corporate customers. The loss of, or a significant reduction in the revenues they receive from, one or more of these customers, may adversely affect the business. For each of products namely sugar, ethanol and cogeneration, derive a significant portion of company’s revenues from a limited number of customers. SRSL derive a significant portion of sugar sales from large corporate customers, such as Nestle, Cadbury, Britannia Industries Ltd and Coca Cola etc.. In fiscal 2005 and 2006, ten largest clients accounted for 72.57 per cent and 73.01 per cent., respectively, of their sugar sales. We have fixed period contracts for sugar sales with these customers and there is no certainty that such contracts will be renewed. The cogeneration business is currently dependent on Reliance Power Trading Corporation Limited, and the Hubli Electricity Supply Company Limited (“HESCOM”). Their ability to purchase power from SRSL and make timely payments determines the profitability of the cogeneration business. While the Indian Electricity Act, 2003 allows “open access” and hence allows us to sell to third parties, currently Reliance Power Trading Corporation Limited and HESCOM are the only purchasers of power from SRSL. Hence, any default by either of them
  38. 38. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 38 and/or any inability on their part to pay us for the power supplied to them, will adversely affect the business and profitability.
  39. 39. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 39 Title of the project “Comparative Profitability Analysis in sugar industry- a study undertaken of Munoli and Ajara plant at Shree Renuka Sugars Ltd.” Main Objectives of the Study: o To know the profitability of Munoli and Ajara Plant. o To estimate the Return on investment of both the Plants. o To compare the profitability of the plants. o To project the profitability of the plants for next 2 years. TECHNIQUES APPLIED FOR THE STUDY o Return on Investment (ROI) o Linear Trend Analysis. Data Collection o Primary Data: Primary data are those data which are collected directly without the use of any secondary media. such as Interaction with the company officials o Secondary Data:
  40. 40. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 40 Secondary data are those which are obtained from sources such as follows: o Annual reports of the company o Internal Financial records of the company o Books Need of the study o To know the advantages of setting up plants at different locations. o To know the various factors affecting the profitability. Limitation o Profitability analysis is a wide study which involves numerous techniques; each and every aspect of it cannot be dealt in detail. o As this is an external study, the results are not complete and clear as I m having a little idea about practical difficulties facing day today, except the information provided by the SRSL; o Lastly the study is purely academic. The experience makes this study less precise when compared with a professional study.
  41. 41. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 41
  42. 42. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 42 In any investment proposal the following are the main points to be considered: o Costs o Benefits o Risks o Opportunity Before an investment proposal is decided a detailed study of these factors is done so as to make the best use of the scarce resources, to earn the best return, ensure the safety from any risk and utilize the opportunity in the best manner. For estimating the profitability of a proposal various items and indices are used. Capital Employed This represents the total money invested in construction of the project as well as initial working capital. Thus, capital employed is equal to: o Fixed capital cost. o Amount of working capital. Fixed capital cost is the total cost of the project. However, this will not include the cost of spares, training cost and margin money for working capital. The provision for these items is made only for financing purpose as these are not capitalized.
  43. 43. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 43 Working capital is the initial expenditure for procurement of raw materials, payment of labour, operating expenses and other overheads till the finished product is sold and cash is realized. The cycle normally takes 3 months to 6 months. However for estimation purpose working capital is generally taken equivalent to 3 months of the cost of production excluding interest and depreciation. Benefits The next item to be estimated is the benefits. Benefits may be in the form of following o Net profit in case of new project o Additional production resulting in additional revenue on incremental basis o Reduction in the cost of production at the same level of production o Lower rejections/wastages o Better working condition o Lower pollution and total pollution control o Energy conservation o Better information system o Import substitution thus saving foreign exchange. Cost of production and services In the process of estimation of profitability of the project the next step is to estimate the cost of production or services of the products or services, the project would be generating. In case of a new project this would be fresh exercise for working out cost of production. Similarly, in the case of running plant the total production process shall be reviewed and additional operation shall be identified for ascertaining the additional cost. This may be on the basis of incremental cost.
  44. 44. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 44 Elements of cost generally are: o Raw Materials o Labthe o Power and Fuel o Repairs and Maintenance o Stores and Spares o Operating cost o Overheads For working out the raw material cost, norms of consumption of various materials are estimated. Similarly for labour, number of workers and for power, units of consumption shall have to be estimated. Gross Margin The term Gross Margin denotes the difference between the net sales/net benefits or savings and cost of production and services before depreciation and interest. Depreciation Depreciation is worked out on straight line method which forms the basis for the purpose of profitability evaluation. Interest on Long Term Loans Interest on long term loans for the project shall be worked out on the basis rate of interest of the particular loan. In case there is more than one loan with different rates of interest, in that case a weighted average rate shall be applied to work out the total interest charged. Interest on Working Capital Loan On the short term loan from the commercial banks for financing working capital, interest is worked out at the prevailing rate. This may be from cash credit facility. Some times for working
  45. 45. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 45 capital, financing is done from other sources also, such as public deposit scheme, etc. thus, the rate of interest will be accordingly applied or working out the total interest charges. Income Tax In arriving at the net profit, Income Tax shall be worked out on the taxable profit at the prevailing rate of Income Tax. Profitability Indices After the details of net sales, net savings, cost of production, etc. have been worked out, various profitability indices shall be calculated. These indices are as follows: o Pay Back Period o Return on Investment (ROI) o Internal Rate of Return by DCF (IRR) o Net Present Value Method (NPV) Pay Back Period Method This method indicates the time required to recover the initial project cost through its benefits/savings. The project with minimum pay back period is accepted. This method is suitable where chances of obsolescence losses are very high. However, it ignores the time value of money to be received in later years and also the income which will be earned in later years after the pay back period. Still this method is popularly used due to its simplicity. Return on Investment Return on investment is worked out by dividing the net benefits/net savings after depreciation but before interest by the capital employed. This method is simple like the pay back period method. However, this method also lacks in considering the time value of money to be received in future years of the project. But it is a very widely used method in the estimation of profitability because of its simplicity. In working out ROI following components of costs and benefits are considered: o Capital employed. This consists of fixed capital costs and working capital.
  46. 46. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 46 o Net benefit/savings o Interest on loans o Depreciation Internal Rate of Return It is the rate of discount that equals the present value of the expected future cash inflows to the present value of the cash out flows. This method is popular and is very widely used. This is mostly used as an important profitability index in major investment proposals. In this method cash flows for incomes as well as expenditure are discounted to bring the same to the present value. It is done on the logic that the money received today is not the same amount, if received after one year or after two years or so on. In this method income as well as expenditure is considered for the entire life of the project. Decision is based on the costs and benefits in terms of present value. Internal rate of return is worked out by discounting the cash outflows and cash inflows from the project. The rate of discount is the result of various trials of calculations. Thus internal rate of return is worked out by trial or error method. However, to avoid many calculations an indicative rate may be known on the basis of pay back period. Net Present Value Method This method also like IRR method considers the income of the entire life of the project and time value of money. The present value of the expected cash flows by the project is determined by discounting these cash flows by the company’s cost of the capital or specified rate. The rate of discount is generally considered as the prevailing borrowing rate or current bank rates of interest. When the present value equals or exceeds the investment, the proposal is considered favourable. In case of alternatives, the alternative is selected with comparatively higher NPV.
  47. 47. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 47
  48. 48. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 48 Plant capacity at Munoli and Ajara Sugar Plant Capacities (in TCD) 2005 2006 2007 Unit - I – Munoli 2,500 2,500 7,500 Unit - II – Ajara 2,500 2,500 2,500 Capacity utilization
  49. 49. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 49 2005 2006 2007 Unit - I – Munoli 114.50% 123.25% 52.31% Unit - II – Ajara 94.75% 119.79% 116.36% Sugar Recovery 2005 2006 2007 Unit - I – Munoli 10.20% 11.20% 10.87% Unit - II – Ajara 11.41% 11.73% 12.01% Capital Employed at Munoli plant (sugar) (Rs. in millions) Particulars 2005 2006 2007 Fixed Capital Building 178,423,808.46 218,321,547.00 311,610,569.00 Depreciation 4,524,827.78 5,536,634.43 7,902,444.03 NET 173,898,980.68 212,784,912.57 303,708,124.97 Land 65,355,887.97 66,127,877.00 53,350,976.00 Depreciation - - - NET 65,355,887.97 66,127,877.00 53,350,976.00
  50. 50. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 50 Plant and Machinery 532,659,865.59 581,996,186.00 1,144,139,101.00 Depreciation 15,979,795.97 17,459,885.58 34,324,173.03 NET 516,680,069.62 564,536,300.42 1,109,814,927.97 Total Fixed Capital 755.93 843.45 1,466.87 Working Capital Term Loan 165.86 165.55 175.05 Owned Funds 55.29 55.18 58.35 Net Working Capital 221.14 220.74 233.40 Total Capital Employed 977.08 1,064.19 1,700.27 Capital Employed at Ajara plant (Rs. in millions) Particulars 2005 2006 2007 Working Capital Bank Borrowing 67.35 140.11 134.55 Owned Funds 22.45 46.70 44.85
  51. 51. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 51 Net Working Capital 89.79 186.81 179.40 Rent 56.00 58.80 61.74 Total Capital Employed 123.35 198.91 196.29 Calculation of EBDIT for Munoli Plant 2005 2006 2007 Crushing 641,200 677,875 839,576 Sugar Production (MT) 65,402 75,922 91,262 Op stock 3,063 6,847 8,277 Total 68,465 82,769 99,539
  52. 52. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 52 Sales 61,619 74,492 89,585 Cl stock 6,847 8,277 9,954 Sales revenue Sales: MT 61,619 74,492 89,585 Free Sale 30,809 37,246 44,792 Exports 24,647 29,797 35,834 Levy Sale 6,162 7,449 8,958 Molasses 32,060 33,894 41,979 Bagasse 211,596 223,699 277,060 Pressmud 25,648 27,115 33,583 Revenue: (Rs. in millions) Sales Sale sugar – Mfg 1,139.95 1,154.62 1,209.40 Sale of Molasses 48.09 67.79 92.35 Sale of bagasse 137.54 100.66 96.97 Sale of Press mud 1.28 1.36 1.68 Total Net Sales 1,326.86 1,324.43 1,400.40 Increase / (decrease in stock) 88.42 11.73 (6.34) Total 1,415.27 1,336.16 1,394.06 Raw materials (Sugarcane) 937.43 1,024.27 975.59 Cane Development Expenses 49.67 44.73 29.80 Power 1.85 1.96 2.42 Consumables &Oths 105.49 58.93 54.57 Stores and Spares 15.05 21.03 1.99 Salaries & wages 29.29 57.07 79.00 Other Manufacturing Exp 27.69 19.70 25.59 Total cost of production 1,166.47 1,227.68 1,168.96 Cost of production / MT 17,835.33 16,170.30 12,808.81 EBIDTA 248.80 108.48 225.10 Depreciation - allocated amt 20.50 23.00 42.23 Amortisation, if any - - - Profit After Depreciation but before Interest and Tax 228.30 85.48 182.87 Calculation of EBDIT for Ajara plant (Rs. in millions) 2005 2006 2007 Crushing 251,088 521,087 523,620 Sugar Production (MT) 28,649 61,123 62,887
  53. 53. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 53 Op stock - 2,865 6,399 Total 28,649 63,988 69,286 Sales 25,784 57,590 62,357 Cl stock 2,865 6,399 6,929 Sales revenue Sales: MT 25,784.18 57,589.52 62,357.04 Free Sale 12,892.09 28,794.76 31,178.52 Exports 10,313.67 23,035.81 24,942.82 Levy Sale 2,578.42 5,758.95 6,235.70 Molasses 12,554.38 26,054.33 26,181.00 Bagasse 82,858.88 171,958.55 172,794.60 Pressmud 10,043.50 20,843.46 20,944.80 Revenue: Sales Sale sugar - Mfg 477.01 892.64 841.82 Sale of Molasses 18.83 52.11 57.60 Sale of bagasse 42.42 175.05 175.90 Sale of Press mud 0.50 1.04 1.05 Total Net Sales 538.76 1,120.84 1,076.37 Increase / (decrease in stock) 52.60 41.00 (1.34) Total 591.37 1,161.84 1,075.03 Raw materials (Sugarcane) 368.53 704.51 641.80 Cane Development Expenses 19.20 34.39 25.66 Power 0.98 2.03 2.04 Consumables &Oths 13.45 32.34 25.14 Salaries & wages 32.33 42.48 50.89 Other Manufacturing Exp 28.94 9.99 11.52 Rent 56.00 58.80 61.74 Stores and Spares 6.61 9.56 18.59 Total cost of production 526.04 894.09 837.37 Cost of production / MT 18,361.46 14,627.60 13,315.57 EBIDTA 65.33 267.75 237.66 Profit After Depreciation but Before Interest and Tax 65.33 267.75 237.66 RETURN ON INVESTMENT
  54. 54. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 54 ROI = Profit after depreciation but before interest and tax X 100 Total capital Employed Calculation of return on investment for the year 2005 (Amounts in Millions) Munoli ROI= 228.3 X 100 977.08 =23.37% Ajara ROI= 65.33 X 100 123.53 =52.96% Calculation of return on investment for the year 2006 (Amounts in Millions) Munoli ROI= 85.48 X 100 1064.19 =8.03% Ajara ROI= 267.75 X 100 198.91 =134.61%
  55. 55. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 55 Calculation of return on investment for the year 2007 (Amounts in Millions) Munoli ROI= 182.87 X 100 1700.27 =10.76% Ajara ROI= 237.66 X 100 196.21 =121.08%
  56. 56. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 56 Projections for the year 2008 and 2009 Munoli (Rs. in millions) 2008 2009 Crushing 917,926 1,017,114 Sugar Production (MT) 107,122 119,206 Op stock 9,954 11,708 Total 117,076 130,913 Sales 105,368 117,822 Cl stock 11,708 13,091 Sales revenue Sales: MT 105,368 117,822 Free Sale 52,684 58,911 Exports 42,147 47,129 Levy Sale 10,537 11,782 Molasses 45,896 50,856 Bagasse 302,916 335,648 Pressmud 36,717 40,685 Revenue: Sale sugar - Mfg 1,443.55 1,649.51 Sale of Molasses 110.15 132.22 Sale of bagasse 90.87 100.69 Sale of Press mud 1.84 2.03 Total Net Sales 1,646.41 1,884.46 Increase / (decrease in stock) 15.18 17.52 Total 1,661.59 1,901.98 Raw materials (Sugarcane) 1,101.51 1,220.54 Cane Development Expenses 21.44 32.84 Power 2.37 2.77 Consumables &Others 50.00 48.70 Stores and Spares 3.00 3.00 Salaries & wages 104.83 129.69 Other Manufacturing Exp 22.30 21.18 Total cost of production 1,305.45 1,458.71 Cost of production / MT 12,186.55 12,236.93 EBIDTA 356.14 443.27
  57. 57. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 57 Depreciation - allocated amt 60.00 60.00 Amortization, if any - - Profit After Depreciation but before Interest and Tax 296.14 383.27
  58. 58. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 58 Ajara 2008 2009 Crushing 664,464 770,731 Sugar Production (MT) 78,274 91,023 Op stock 6,929 8,520 Total 85,202 99,544 Sales 76,682 89,589 Cl stock 8,520 9,954 Sales revenue Sales: MT 76,682.18 89,589.22 Free Sale 38,341.09 44,794.61 Exports 30,672.87 35,835.69 Levy Sale 7,668.22 8,958.92 Molasses 33,223.20 38,536.55 Bagasse 219,273.12 254,341.23 Pressmud 26,578.56 30,829.24 Revenue: (Rs. in millions) Sales Sale sugar - Mfg 1,111.89 1,254.25 Sale of Molasses 79.74 100.20 Sale of bagasse 65.78 76.30 Sale of Press mud 1.33 1.54 Total Net Sales 1,258.74 1,432.29 Increase / (decrease in stock) 20.70 17.36 Total 1,279.44 1,449.64 Raw materials (Sugarcane) 797.36 924.88 Cane Development Expenses 32.84 36.07 Power 2.91 3.66 Consumables &Others 35.33 41.19 Salaries & wages 60.46 69.74 Other Manufacturing Exp 24.00 26.00 Rent 64.83 68.07 Stores and Spares 20.00 22.00 Total cost of production 1,037.72 1,191.61 Cost of production / MT 13,257.61 13,091.24 EBIDTA 241.71 258.04 Depreciation - allocated amt - - Amortization, if any - - Profit After Depreciation but
  59. 59. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 59 Before Interest and Tax 241.71 258.04 Calculation of return on investment for the year 2008 (Amounts in Millions) Munoli ROI= 283.50 X 100 1246.06 =22.75% Ajara ROI= 300.93 X 100 274.62 =109.58% Calculation of return on investment for the year 2009 (Amounts in Millions) Munoli ROI= 383.27 X 100 1327.44 =28.87% Ajara ROI= 333.91 X 100 306.91 =108.80%
  60. 60. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 60 PROFIT MARGIN Profit margin = Profit after depreciation but before interest and tax X 100 Net sales Years 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Ajara 12.13% 23.89% 22.08% 23.91% 23.31% Munoli 17.21% 7.37% 5.79% 17.22% 20.34%
  61. 61. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 61 Chart showing the trend for Return on Investment ROI (Munoli) 23.37 9.17 4.77 22.75 28.87 - 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 30.00 35.00 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Years Returns
  62. 62. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 62 ROI (Ajara) 52.96 134.61 121.08 109.58 108.80 - 20.00 40.00 60.00 80.00 100.00 120.00 140.00 160.00 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Years Returns Chart showing the trend of Profit Margin Profit Margin(Munoli) 17.21% 7.37% 5.79% 17.22% 20.34% 0.00% 5.00% 10.00% 15.00% 20.00% 25.00% 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Years Profit(%)
  63. 63. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 63 Profit Margin(Ajara) 12.13% 23.89% 22.08% 23.91% 23.31% 0.00% 5.00% 10.00% 15.00% 20.00% 25.00% 30.00% 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Years Profit(%) Interpretation o Return on Investment 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Munoli 23.37% 9.17 % 4.77% 22.75% 28.87% Ajara 52.96% 134.61% 121.08% 109.58% 108.80% o Profit Margin 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
  64. 64. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 64 Munoli 17.21% 7.37% 5.79% 17.22% 20.34% Ajara 12.13% 23.89% 22.08% 23.91% 23.31%
  65. 65. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 65 Plant wise comparison o The return on investment and the profit margin of Ajara plant is higher than that of Munoli plant due to the following reasons: 1. The percentage of recovery of sugar in Ajara plant (12.01%) is higher as compared to Munoli plant (10.87%) in the year2007. 2. The capacity utilization at Ajara plant (116.36%) is higher as compared to Munoli plant (52.31%) in the year 2007. 3. The over all cost of production at Munoli plant is higher to that of Ajara plant. 4. Except some of the costs like transportation, power, rest all costs of production of Munoli plant is higher than Ajara plant. 5. The quality of the machineries used in Ajara plant is good as compared to the machineries used in Munoli plant. 6. Ajara plant is a leased plant and the capital investment is very low as compared to the investment done in Munoli plant. 7. The cane development expenses paid is very less in Ajara plant where as it is comparatively higher in Munoli.
  66. 66. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 66 Year wise comparison o The profits and the returns of Munoli plant in the year 2005 are higher than that of 2006,2007 Because of the following reasons: 1. In the year 2007 the plant capacity of Munoli plant was increased from 2500TCD to7500TCD but the recovery of sugar was comparatively less in that period. Due to the expansion in the capacity the expenses of manufacturing were also huge and the Sugar prices also reduced. 2. In the year 2005 there were droughts in India which affected the production of sugarcane. o The profits and the returns of Ajara plant in the year 2005 are lower than that of 2006,2007 Because of the following reasons: 1. Ajara plant was a sick unit which was taken over by SRSL in the year 2005 so the returns were less in the first year(2005) 2. The capacity utilization in the year 2005 was 94.75% as compared to the utilization in the year 2006 & 2007 which was above 100%.
  67. 67. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 67 .
  68. 68. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 68 Suggestions o Ajara plant is highly profitable plant; SRSL should consider it as a good option for acquisition so that they can go for expansion and increase its profitability. o .The profitability and returns of Ajara plant shows growth, which is a good sign for SRSL and they can further think of increasing the capacity of Ajara plant. o The Sugar industry is growing at the rate of 3.5% and SRSL can make huge profits from Munoli plant in the coming years if the machineries used in the plant are properly rectified and maintained. o As the sugar industry undergoes a cycle of growth and depression once in 2 years SRSL has to increase its productivity by increasing the recovery rate of sugar and its capacity utilization to maintain its level of returns and profitability.
  69. 69. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 69
  70. 70. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 70 o Ajara plant shows returns at a higher side as compared to Munoli plant as the capital invested in the Ajara plant is very low as compared to the investment made in the Munoli plant. o Ajara plant is more profitable than Munoli plant as the rate of recovery and the capacity utilization of Ajara plant is higher than that of Munoli plant. o In the coming years both the plants have the required strength to sustain the competition for maintain good returns and profit margin.
  71. 71. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 71
  72. 72. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 72 Books: o Project Management and Control by Narendra Singh, 2nd edition. o Financial Management by M.Y. Khan & P.K. Jain 4th edition. Web Sites: o www.shreerenukasugars.com o www. Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com
  73. 73. A PROJECT REPORT ON COMPARATIVE PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS IN SUGAR INDUSTRY UNDERTAKEN AT SHREE RENUKA SUGARS LTD Babasabpatilfreepptmba.com Page 73

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